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Programming: Python, Ansible Modules and LLDB

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Development
  • Sunsetting Python 2

    We are volunteers who make and take care of the Python programming language. We have decided that January 1, 2020, will be the day that we sunset Python 2. That means that we will not improve it anymore after that day, even if someone finds a security problem in it. You should upgrade to Python 3 as soon as you can.

  • Monitoring traffic of your Github repositories using Python and Google Cloud Platform — Part 1

    It is an article about monitoring your Github open-source repositories traffic. Unfortunately, you can see these statistics only by accessing each repository step by step. You may not want to access them at all? But if you do, you can use this small tool.

  • wxPython – Creating a PDF Merger / Splitter Utility

    The Portable Document Format (PDF) is a well-known format popularized by Adobe. It purports to create a document that should render the same across platforms.

  • The weekly Python news report

    Django 3.0 alpha 1 is now available. The first stage in the 3.0 release cycle is ready for you to use.

  • Python Anywhere: Our new CPU API

    We received many requests from PythonAnywhere users to make it possible to programmatically monitor usage of CPU credit, so we decided to add a new endpoint to our experimental API.

    The first step when using the API is to get an API token -- this is what you use to authenticate yourself with our servers when using it. To do that, log in to PythonAnywhere, and go to the "Account" page using the link at the top right.

  • Test and Code: 87: Paths to Parametrization - from one test to many

    There's a cool feature of pytest called parametrization.
    It's totally one of the superpowers of pytest.

    It's actually a handful of features, and there are a few ways to approach it.
    Parametrization is the ability to take one test, and send lots of different input datasets into the code under test, and maybe even have different output checks, all within the same test that you developed in the simple test case.

    Super powerful, but something since there's a few approaches to it, a tad tricky to get the hang of.

  • 10 Ansible modules you need to know

    Ansible is an open source IT configuration management and automation platform. It uses human-readable YAML templates so users can program repetitive tasks to happen automatically without having to learn an advanced programming language.

    Ansible is agentless, which means the nodes it manages do not require any software to be installed on them. This eliminates potential security vulnerabilities and makes overall management smoother.

    Ansible modules are standalone scripts that can be used inside an Ansible playbook. A playbook consists of a play, and a play consists of tasks. These concepts may seem confusing if you're new to Ansible, but as you begin writing and working more with playbooks, they will become familiar.

  • How to debug where a function returns using LLDB from the command line

More in Tux Machines

Games: Atomix, Get-A-Grip Chip, GDScript in Godot

  • Atomix: A Molecule Building Game for Chemistry Nerds

    Atomix is built for Gnome desktops for Linux and Unix systems. However, if you in something similar you can try Atomiks for Windows and Linux desktops.

  • Robot grappling-magnet platformer Get-A-Grip Chip is out now and I'm hooked | GamingOnLinux

    A platformer where you can't jump? Well, it's been done before but not quite like this. Get-A-Grip Chip is out now and it's a wonderfully unique indie game worth your time. Note: key sent by the developer. Thing is, grappling hooks have been done before too, and there's a number of excellent games with it. Get-A-Grip Chip is still different though, as the grapple is a big magnet on your robot head and you can only use it at specific points. The challenge here is getting in range of each point, to hop between them all. The result is a game that's seriously charming, while also proving to be a good challenge.

  • GDScript progress report: Typed instructions

    It's been a while my last report because this particular task took me more time than I anticipated. GDScript now got a much needed optimization. Bug fixes Between my last report and this one I've been fixing many bugs in GDScript. While not thorough, it should be stable enough to not crash all the time. I am aware that a lot of bugs remain, but I'll iron them out when the features are complete. As I said before, if you found a bug not yet reported make sure to open a new issue so I can be aware of it. [...] I know many of you have been waiting for this. GDScript has had optional typing for quite a while, but so far it had only been for validation in the compilation phase. Now we're finally getting some performance boost at runtime. Note that some optimized instructions are applied with type inference but to enjoy the most benefit you have to use static typing for everything (you also get safer code, so it's a plus).

today's howtos

  • Install MultiPass on Ubuntu : A good VM Manager - LinuxTechLab

    Multipass is a very lightweight VM manager that can be used to launch & manage VMs with a single Linux command. It is available on Linux, macOS as well as Windows. On Windows, it used Hyper-V, on Linux, it uses KVM & on Mac it used HyperKit. It can simulate a cloud environment with the support of cloud-init. It helps to create a new development or testing environment with ease. It also supports VirtualBox on macOS & Linux also. In this tutorial, we will learn how to install Multipass on Ubuntu

  • How to install Java on Manjaro Linux

    Many developers and programmers choose Manjaro because it's one of the most user-friendly and feature-rich Linux distributions. In this guide, we go over the steps to install the Java Development Kit on Manjaro Linux. We'll show you how to install both the OpenJDK package (which is free and GPL-licensed) as well as Oracle Java SE Development Kit. Arch Linux and Manjaro only officially support the OpenJDK, as that is the non-proprietary version. However, the Oracle package can be installed from the AUR, as you'll see shortly.

  • Lenovo ThinkPad Booting GNU/Linux USB

    Lenovo ThinkPad users can boot USB drives finely. As Ubuntu Buzz often publishes booting articles, now let's learn how to practice that on computers using ThinkPad as example. By making this tutorial I hope I give abilities to all computer users who didn't know yet they can do this amazing thing. Let's go!

  • How to install Arduino IDE on CentOS 8

    Arduino IDE stands for the “Arduino Integrated Development Environment”. Arduino is used to create electronic devices that communicate with their environment using actuators and sensors. Arduino IDE contains an editor that is used for writing and uploading programs to the Arduino board. Before start to create projects through Arduino, the user needs to set up an IDE for the programmable board. In this article, we will learn how to install the latest Arduino IDE on CentOS 8.

  • Vincent Fourmond: QSoas tips and tricks: generating smooth curves from a fit

    Often, one would want to generate smooth data from a fit over a small number of data points. For an example, take the data in the following file. It contains (fake) experimental data points that obey to Michaelis-Menten kinetics: $$v = \frac{v_m}{1 + K_m/s}$$ in which \(v\) is the measured rate (the y values of the data), \(s\) the concentration of substrate (the x values of the data), \(v_m\) the maximal rate and \(K_m\) the Michaelis constant. [...] Now, with the fit, we have reasonable values for \(v_m\) (vm) and \(K_m\) (km). But, for publication, one would want to generate "smooth" curve going through the lines... Saving the curve from "Data.../Save all" doesn't help, since the data has as many points as the original data and looks very "jaggy" (like on the screenshot above)... So one needs a curve with more data points.

Gerrit code review tool taken offline after suspected admin account compromise

Gerrit has been taken offline after malicious activity was flagged on the open source code collaboration platform. The web-based Git code review service was disabled two hours after project maintainers were alerted to a suspected security breach on Tuesday morning (October 20). “We believe an admin account in Gerrit was compromised allowing an attacker to escalate privileges within Gerrit,” said Clark Boylan in a service announcement issued later that day. “Around 02:00 UTC October 20 suspicious review activity was noticed, and we were made aware of it shortly afterwards. “The involved account was disabled and removed from privileged Gerrit groups. After further investigation we decided that we needed to stop the service, this happened at about 04:00 UTC.” Read more

Sailfish OS now lets you share your Mobile Linux device

Use Multi-account sign-on on your Mobile Linux device. Jolla has Introduced this feature as part of its latest Sailfish OS 3.4 Pallas-Yllästunturi release software update. Having the ability to share a mobile device amongst your family or co-workers can be very useful. This is something that mobile manufacturers such as Motorola have been doing on their smartphones and Samsung on their tablets for a while now. What I mean by sharing is that everyone can have their own Independent accounts set up on the device - once logged in they have access to their OWN emails, social media accounts, pictures, etc. It's THEIR device. Read more