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today's howtos and leftovers

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Misc
HowTos
  • Making Sink(ed) contacts accessible to Plasma-Phonebook App
  • How to Delete MySQL Users Accounts
  • How to sync Google Contacts with Thunderbird
  • How to set the GNOME idle delay from the command line
  • Four Apollo Lake Pico-ITX SBCs start at $245 in single units

    Logic Supply has launched four Ubuntu-ready “EPM16x” Pico-ITX SBCs with Apollo Lake SoCs starting at $245. The $426 and up EPM163 has a Pentium N4200, 4GB LPDDR4, 64GB eMMC, mSATA, mini-PCIe, and 2x each of GbE, DP, and USB 3.0.

    We’ve reported on over a dozen Linux-friendly Pico-ITX boards with Intel Apollo Lake processors over the last few years, including most recently, Axiomtek’s PICO319 and IEI’s Hyper-AL. Yet, as some of our readers have complained, they are rarely announced with ship dates or prices, and if they are, they usually list only volume pricing.

  • Huawei Covers Android Gap with IoT OS

    If you’ve been watching the smartphone world, you may know of Huawei’s problems with the United States. Huawei has had a spotty history of spying on American technology, to the point where Huawei products have been banned from being sold in the US.

    Huawei responded by saying they would very much like to continue relations with Android and have been hoping they get a second chance with the technology giant. They have stated, however, that if they are officially cut off from Android, they would make their own OS.

  • Gaurav Agrawal: Google Summer of Code 2019 FINAL REPORT

    My Google Summer of Code (GSOC) project was focused on “Implementing split view” in gnome-gitg. This blog posts serves as my final submission to my Google Summer of Code project.

  • Command Line Heroes season 3, episode 5: The Infrastructure Effect: COBOL and Go

    Languages used for IT infrastructure don't have expiration dates. COBOL's been around for 60 years - and isn't going anywhere anytime soon. We maintain billions of lines of classic code for mainframes. But we're also building new infrastructures for the cloud in languages like Go.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S12E20 – Outrun

    This week we’ve been experimenting with lean podcasting and playing Roguelikes. We discuss what goes on at a Canonical Roadmap Sprint, bring you some command line love and go over all your feedback.

    It’s Season 12 Episode 20 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Stuart Langridge are connected and speaking to your brain.

More in Tux Machines

Programming: Python, Node.js and LLVM

  • uwsgi weirdness with --http

    Instead of upgrading everything on my server, I'm just starting from scratch. From Ubuntu 16.04 to Ubuntu 19.04 and I also upgraded everything else in sight. One of them was uwsgi. I copied various user config files but for uwsgi things didn't very well. On the old server I had uwsgi version 2.0.12-debian and on the new one 2.0.18-debian. The uWSGI changelog is pretty hard to read but I sure don't see any mention of this.

  • Wingware Blog: Viewing Arrays and Data Frames in Wing Pro 7

    Wing Pro 7 introduced an array and data frame viewer that can be used to inspect data objects in the debugger. Values are transferred to the IDE according to what portion of the data is visible on the screen, so working with large data sets won't slow down the IDE. The array viewer works with Pandas, numpy, sqlite3, xarray, Python's builtin lists, tuples, and dicts, and other classes that emulate lists, tuples, or dicts.

  • Solving Sequence Problems with LSTM in Keras: Part 2

    This is the second and final part of the two-part series of articles on solving sequence problems with LSTMs. In the part 1 of the series, I explained how to solve one-to-one and many-to-one sequence problems using LSTM. In this part, you will see how to solve one-to-many and many-to-many sequence problems via LSTM in Keras. Image captioning is a classic example of one-to-many sequence problems where you have a single image as input and you have to predict the image description in the form of a word sequence. Similarly, stock market prediction for the next X days, where input is the stock price of the previous Y days, is a classic example of many-to-many sequence problems. In this article you will see very basic examples of one-to-many and many-to-many problems. However, the concepts learned in this article will lay the foundation for solving advanced sequence problems, such as stock price prediction and automated image captioning that we will see in the upcoming articles.

  • Voronoi Mandalas

    I started with Carlos Focil's mandalapy code, modifying the parameters until I had a design I liked. I decided to make the Voronoi diagram show both points and vertices, and I gave it an equal aspect ratio. Carlos' mandalapy code is a port of Antonio Sánchez Chinchón's inspiring work drawing mandalas with R, using the deldir library to plot Voronoi tesselations.

  • Python Code Kata: Fizzbuzz

    A code kata is a fun way for computer programmers to practice coding. They are also used a lot for learning how to implement Test Driven Development (TDD) when writing code. One of the popular programming katas is called FizzBuzz. This is also a popular interview question for computer programmers.

  • why python is the best-suited programming language machine learning

    Machine Learning is the hottest trend in modern times. According to Forbes, Machine learning patents grew at a 34% rate between 2013 and 2017 and this is only set to increase in the future. And Python is the primary programming language used for much of the research and development in Machine Learning. So much so that Python is the top programming language for Machine Learning according to Github. Python is currently the most popular programming language for research and development in Machine Learning. But you don’t need to take my word for it! According to Google Trends, the interest in Python for Machine Learning has spiked to an all-new high with other ML languages such as R, Java, Scala, Julia, etc. lagging far behind.

  • Node.js now available in Haiku

    As some have already known for a long time, many platforms have had support for writing software in JavaScript or TypeScript with the help of the Node.js runtime and over the years, much of the software written by developers these days have gradually been written in either of those languages. However, Haiku has lacked a Node.js port for quite sometime and it wasn’t possible to run or develop JavaScript based software or libraries that depended on the Node.js runtime. Now I can say that Node.js is available for Haiku and can be downloaded from HaikuDepot on 64 bit (32 bit support is being worked on). The version which is currently available is 12.3.1 and is already being updated to the latest version at the time of this writing to 12.10.0 and support for the upcoming LTS version is also coming to HaikuPorts. Several patches have been upstreamed by members of the HaikuPorts team to projects such as libuv (cross-platform async I/O library), GN, etc and we hope to upstream to larger projects like V8 (Google’s JavaScript engine used in Chromium and QtWebEngine) and the Node.js project, which will ease the bringup of a future Node LTS release for Haiku.

  • Node.js Brought To BeOS-Inspired Haiku Open-Source OS

    Haiku as the open-source operating system that still maintains BeOS compatibility continues tacking on modern features and support for software well past the days of BeOS. The newest major piece of software working on BeOS is Node.js, including support for its NPM package manager.

  • LLVM 9.0 Released With Ability To Build The Linux x86_64 Kernel, Experimental OpenCL C++

    It's coming almost one month behind schedule, but LLVM 9.0 is out today along with the Clang 9.0 C/C++ compiler and associated sub-projects for this open-source compiler infrastructure. LLVM 9.0 is an exciting release with bringing the ability to build the mainline Linux x86_64 kernel using LLVM/Clang 9.0 now that "asm goto" support was finally added. The AArch64 support was in better standing previously but now at long last the mainline Clang 9.0 compiler can build the current Linux kernel releases with not needing any extra patches on either side, just point the kernel build CC to Clang.

Linux 5.4 Development, PRs, Merges

  • BLK-IOCOST Merged For Linux 5.4 To Better Account For Cost Of I/O Workloads

    BLK-IOCOST is a new I/O controller by veteran kernel developer Tejun Heo that is a work-conserving proportional controller. He goes over blk-iocost in great detail in one of the earlier patch series, "It currently has a simple linear cost model builtin where each IO is classified as sequential or random and given a base cost accordingly and additional size-proportional cost is added on top. Each IO is given a cost based on the model and the controller issues IOs for each cgroup according to their hierarchical weight. By default, the controller adapts its overall IO rate so that it doesn't build up buffer bloat in the request_queue layer, which guarantees that the controller doesn't lose significant amount of total work...The controller provides extra QoS control knobs which allow tightening control feedback loop as necessary." See that aforelinked article for more details and results.

  • Btrfs & XFS File-Systems See More Fixes With Linux 5.4

    The mature XFS and Btrfs file-systems continue seeing more fixes and cleaning with the now in-development Linux 5.4 kernel. On the Btrfs front the Linux 5.4 changes are summed up as "work on code refactoring, sanity checks and space handling. There are some less user visible changes, nothing that would particularly stand out." The Btrfs changes include deprecating a few items as well as improving the exposure of debugging information via sysfs. See the pull request for all the Btrfs file-system fixes and changes this round.

  • Linux 5.4 DRM Pull Submitted With AMD Navi 12/14, Arcturus & Renoir Plus Intel Tigerlake

    While we've known about the many features for a while if you are a faithful Phoronix reader, today the Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) graphics driver changes were sent in for the Linux 5.4 kernel.

Spartan Edge Accelerator Arduino Compatible Board Combines ESP32 & Spartan-7 FPGA

Xilinx Spartan FPGAs have been around for a while, and a few years ago we covered Spartan-6 FPGA boards such as Spartixed and miniSpartan6+. Read more

Fedora: rpminspect, Fedora 31 Upgrade Test Day, Cockpit 203 and More

  • rpminspect-0.6 released with new inspections and bug fixes

    This release also includes a lot of bug fixes. I really appreciate all of the feedback users have been providing. It is really helping round out the different inspections and ensure it works across all types of builds. For details on what is new in rpminspect-0.6, see the release page.

  • Fedora 31 Upgrade Test Day 2019-09-23

    Monday 2019-09-23, is the Fedora 31 Upgrade Test Day! As part of preparing for the final release of Fedora 31, we need your help to test if everything runs smoothly!

  • Cockpit Project: Cockpit 203

    Cockpit is the modern Linux admin interface. We release regularly. Here are the release notes from version 203.

  • Attention: Fedora Yahoo Email Users

    Going from a blast of the past we are currently going through one of the Yahoo is not allowing many emails with either fedoraproject.org OR from our mail routers. It would seem that the way to get yahoo to blacklist a domain is to get subscribed to mailing lists and then report the lists as SPAM. Enough accounts (or maybe if one person does it enough times).. yahoo will helpfully blacklist the domain completely. [It then is usually a multi-month process of people explaining that no Fedora is not a spam site, hasn't been taken over by a spam site, or a bunch of other things which do happen so any mail admin is going to be wary on.]