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Mozilla: Flexbox Inspector, WebRender and Another Person Quits

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Moz/FF
  • Designing the Flexbox Inspector

    The new Flexbox Inspector, created by Firefox DevTools, helps developers understand the sizing, positioning, and nesting of Flexbox elements. You can try it out now in Firefox DevEdition or join us for its official launch in Firefox 65 on January 29th.

    The UX challenges of this tool have been both frustrating and a lot of fun for our team. Built on the basic concepts of the CSS Grid Inspector, we sought to expand on the possibilities of what a design tool could be. I’m excited to share a behind-the-scenes look at the UX patterns and processes that drove our design forward.

  • WebRender newsletter #35

    Bonsoir! Another week, another newsletter. I stealthily published WebRender on crates.io this week. This doesn’t mean anything in terms of API stability and whatnot, but it makes it easier for people to use WebRender in their own rust projects. Many asked for it so there it is. Everyone is welcome to use it, find bugs, report them, submit fixes and improvements even!

    In other news we are initiating a notable workflow change: WebRender patches will land directly in Firefox’s mozilla-central repository and a bot will automatically mirror them on github. This change mostly affects the gfx team. What it means for us is that testing webrender changes becomes a lot easier as we don’t have to manually import every single work in progress commit to test it against Firefox’s CI anymore. Also Kats won’t have to spend a considerable amount of his time porting WebRender changes to mozilla-central anymore.

  • thank u, next

    I don’t believe that has any chance of changing; when I’ve tried to express my frustrations, I’ve only gotten disciplined. Mozilla is not interested in hearing what I have to say. And that’s fine, but when I take a step back and think about things, that means it’s time to go, for both my sake and Mozilla’s. So I’ve just put in my two weeks’ notice.

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Android Leftovers

Android Low-Memory Killer--In or Out?

One of the jobs of the Linux kernel—and all operating system kernels—is to manage the resources available to the system. When those resources get used up, what should it do? If the resource is RAM, there's not much choice. It's not feasible to take over the behavior of any piece of user software, understand what that software does, and make it more memory-efficient. Instead, the kernel has very little choice but to try to identify the software that is most responsible for using up the system's RAM and kill that process. The official kernel does this with its OOM (out-of-memory) killer. But, Linux descendants like Android want a little more—they want to perform a similar form of garbage collection, but while the system is still fully responsive. They want a low-memory killer that doesn't wait until the last possible moment to terminate an app. The unspoken assumption is that phone apps are not so likely to run crucial systems like heart-lung machines or nuclear fusion reactors, so one running process (more or less) doesn't really matter on an Android machine. Read more

today's leftovers