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Security: Ubuntu, DragonFlyBSD, Apple Ban and Reproducible Builds

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Security
  • Canonical Outs New Kernel Security Updates for All Supported Ubuntu Releases

    Canonical released new kernel security updates for all supported Ubuntu Linux releases to address several security vulnerabilities discovered by various security researchers in the upstream Linux kernel.

    The new kernel updates are available for Ubuntu 18.04 LTS (Bionic Beaver), Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr) operating system series and address a total of nine security vulnerabilities affecting the kernels for 64-bit, 32-bit, Raspberry Pi 2, AWS, and GCP systems, as well as cloud environments.

  • DragonFlyBSD Gets Better Hardened Against CPU Speculative Execution Bugs

    While the DragonFlyBSD kernel has already landed its mitigation for Spectre V1/V2 and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities, a fresh round of CPU bug hardening work was just merged into their kernel.

    This latest CPU bug hardening primarily revolves around a rumor that the contents of floating poiunt registers owned by another process could be speculatively detected when they are present for the running process. Intel hasn't communicated clarly over this FP register speculation, so OpenBSD already decided to rework some of their code as a safeguard and now DragonFlyBSD has too.

  • Apple Officially Bans Cryptocurrency Mining Apps For MacOS And iOS
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #163

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They don't make 'em like they used to, do they? Video games, I mean. Sure, there's a bit more grunt in the gear now. Princess Zelda used to be 16 pixels in each direction; there's now enough graphics power for every hair on her head. Today's processors could beat up 1988's processors in a cage-fight deathmatch without breaking a sweat. But you know what's missing? The fun. You've got a squillion and one buttons to learn just to get past the tutorial mission. There's probably a storyline, too. You shouldn't need a backstory to kill bad guys. All you need is jump and shoot. So, it's little wonder that one of the most enduring popular uses for a Raspberry Pi is to relive the 8- and 16-bit golden age of gaming in the '80s and early '90s. But where to start? Read more

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