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Freespire Beta Release Notes


Core OS

  • Restore ISP connection packages.
  • Add release notes to the startup wizard.
  • Remove entries from sources.list that are not mirrored on apt.freespire.org.
  • Email Notifier is included.
  • Diagnostic Reports now require text in the comments field.
  • Updated Graphics for Installer Panels
  • Lots of Misc. bugs


KDE

  • Limit number of rows in taskbar to 1 (check to on and set to 1)
  • Group similar tasks (set to Never)
  • Control Center now defaults to show Advanced Options
  • Renamed the Control Center 'component chooser' to 'default application selector'
  • In the file manager, when you change the view preference (say, from icons to list), it should now save the last setting.
  • .iso files are now associated with the k3b application
  • turned on the bouncing mouse 'busy' cursor


CNR

  • CNR now starts up after the first run wizard
  • CNR no longer hangs after an update
  • The pause button works as intended in all cases
  • Fixed: If you quit CNR, restart CNR, sign in button never activates
  • When downloading packages for an install, the percent downloaded now works


BROWSER

  • email links on a web page now open default Freespire email client automatically
  • Change default Browser > Preferences > Downloads > Download Manager/Show Download Manager when a download begins TO OFF (NOT checked).
  • Miscellaneous Hotwords-Hover N Highlight tweaks
  • Added new Tab button on Toolbar, next to the Home icon.
  • Updated Help > About content and Credits.
  • Turn off Check default browser dialog
  • Fixed: At times the browser stops responding to clicking on links or form submit buttons. You click them, and nothing happens. If you use the scroll wheel button on links, they do open in a tab, but you can't use the left mouse button to open the link in the existing window.


EMAIL

  • New email client icon and mail start page
  • Lphoto's 'email' button now works!
  • Fix crash during email creation if user uses 4 or more addressees during email composition, then uses the addressee field scroll bar.
  • Fixed: while composing an email, after you enter an email address in the To or CC line, you have to hit enter TWICE before it advances to the next line.
  • Assume mail program as system default.
  • Set defaults for view images in emails to ON.
  • Mailto links in Lphoto and Gaim will not compose mail unless a browser has been previously opened during your session.
  • Email > Edit > Account Settings > Composition & Addressing > change to starting reply ABOVE my message (not below).
  • Default email 'SEnd format' to both HTML and text.
  • Fix missing scroll graphic in To/CC/BCC section.
  • MailMinder server-client communication is still not fully working (only use Mailminder for testing, not production usage at this time)


Freespire Beta 1 Release Notes


Important Information About Freespire Beta 1

If you haven't already, it is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED that you read this post from the Freespire forums about the Beta 1 release. There is a lot of useful information to be found there and it would be helpful for all to read this post before downloading or installing Freespire Beta 1. You may also wish to refer to the Freespire Roadmap for additional information.


Known and Verified Bugs in Freespire Beta 1

You can find a list of known and verified bugs here. (To report a new bug, go here.)


Freespire Beta 1 - Changes in this Release


Core OS

  • There will be two versions available:
  1. Freespire - This is the regular, complete version, comprised largely of open source software, but which also includes proprietary codecs, drivers and applications for an enhanced, "out-of-the-box" user experience. (Visit the Summary of Proprietary Components page for a detailed list of the licensed software used in this version.)
  2. Freespire OSS Edition - This version removes any software that isn't licensed as open source. This version will have limited functionality, as it will not, out-of-the box, support MP3, Real, Java, Flash, QuickTime, Windows Media, ATI drivers, nVidia drivers, etc. (Note: As per this post, the Freespire OSS Edition of Beta 1 will be released a few days after the regular version.)
  • Freespire is by design kept "light" and to the basic, most-used applications, so that it can fit on one CD. Users can then use CNR or apt-get to install additional software. Visit http://freespire.org/warehouse to learn more.
  • Basic developer tools and packages are included in the OS by default, such as Kernel configs & headers, gcc libraries, emacs, vim, qtdesigner, etc. (Additional developer tools can be added with CNR or apt-get).
  • Users have the ability to use CNR or apt-get to install software from the CNR Warehouse (or other Debian repositories).
  • The CNR Warehouse and the CNR Client use standard .deb packaging for all free, open source software. (Only certain 3rd-party, proprietary commercial applications might at times use an encrypted .deb file, as per the copyright holder/vendor's specification.)
  • During install, by default, an Admin account (a user account with full access rights, "pseudo-root") is created. Logging in as root is still possible, but is not the default and must be intentionally set up after installation is completed. (Visit Creating a Root Login Account to learn more.) Additional user and admin accounts may be added or removed at anytime, each with varying access rights assigned manually.
  • A Partition Utility (Gparted) for adding or modifying the partitions on a hard drive before installing the Freespire OS boot option has been included.
  • Unlike Linspire, Autorun has been removed for .exe files, Lsongs, CDs, etc.
  • Freespire will soon be made available as a VMWare Virtual Appliance.
  • Unlike Linspire, the Desktop Pager is set on in the sytem tray for accessing multiple desktops.
  • Added a utility to allow the user to set or change the DVD region code.
  • Users will be able to install and reboot on multiple partition or multiple hard disc systems.


Email/Browser

  • The Freespire default web browser and email client are based on Firefox and Thunderbird, respectively, not Mozilla. However, both of these programs still include the advanced features and many improvements Linspire makes to enhance these programs, such as misc. bug fixes, in-line spell checking, "hot words," MailMinder, etc. The email and browser contain many usability patches as well.
  • A new kcontrol module is included for easily changing the default browser and email. This can be useful for users who wish to use kmail, evolution, Opera, etc instead of the Freespire email/browser clients.
  • Mailminder is directly integrated into the email client, rather than being part of the Lassist Suite.
  • Vastly improved syncronizing of KDE filetypes (mimetypes) with Browser filetypes.


Graphics

  • New "Freespire" wallpapers, icons, themes and other branding in the OS are included.
  • Audio Tutorials are not installed by default, but will be available from the CNR Warehouse.
  • The VirusSafe and SurfSafe icons/programs are removed by default but will be available from the CNR Warehouse.
  • The Start-up Wizard content has been updated to reflect Freespire-specific content.
  • New EULAs are included to reflect Freespire-specific content and programs.


Networking

  • Added feature to the network tools so that the control panel will notice new interfaces (PC cards, USB devices, etc) shortly after they're attached.
  • Pass-phrases can now be used for 128-bit WEP encryption
  • New built in VPN manager supports OpenVPN, as well as unencrypted PPTP
  • Automatic profile switching works with multiple wired and wireless connections
  • Prefer wired connections over wireless if auto switch is enabled
  • Saving of current wifi/wired connection as a Profile is now supported.
  • A new graphical networking debugging tool is included for tasks such as ping, whois, traceroute, etc.

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