Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

having a problem installing a driver.

Filed under
Hardware

Hi there linux users,

ok i'v just installed linux xp on my pc. i'm having a problem with linux xp to install a driver for my dlink network card. the model is of my dlink is DGE 530T. how do i install the driver for my network card?

p.s. i have linux xp 2006.

please help me figure this out.

i do have a read me here, i

i do have a read me here, i need your help on how to complie the patch.

everything but my network card isn't installed.

do you want me to send you the read me's so you can help me apply the drier?

re: readme

Does it say that it'll work for linux xp whatever kernel version? Does your xp install have the kernel sources either installed or available?

It doesn't say Redhat 7.3 only?

Did you try to see if skge was available on your xp install?

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Hello, how do i install the

Hello, how do i install the drivers for my dlink?

1 more thing i am on another o.s. windows xp for the internet sorry for not putting that in. that's why i asked to need some help to know how to install my network card to be installed.

re: Hello, how do i install the

yugiohgx476 wrote:

Hello, how do i install the drivers for my dlink?

1 more thing i am on another o.s. windows xp for the internet sorry for not putting that in. that's why i asked to need some help to know how to install my network card to be installed.

Well, it appears that your card might be supported by the skge module. Only thing is, I'm not sure linux xp includes it and if it doesnt, I'm not sure (I don't recall) if they included the kernel source or made it available. Perhaps you could install a new kernel if needed. But linux xp is highly proprietary and lots of stuff isn't the same as in your more traditional linux distros. It's really only good as an introduction.

But try to:

modprobe skge

and if you see no errors, look in

cat /proc/pci

or

dmesg

and see if you see any evidence that it was recognized.

If so, how do you get connected? dhcp? you could

which dhcpcd

to see if it's included or

which dhclient

and if you find one of those, run it.

Report back after this and we'll see if there's much else we can do. Unfortunately, you picked an OS as well as a lan card that are both closed sourced and proprietary. Sad

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

More in Tux Machines

Unimpressive Yakkety Yak, Plasma 5 Issues in Leap

Today was a rough day in Linux distro news, Scott Gilbertson reviewed the Beta of upcoming Ubuntu 16.10 saying there's not a whole lot to recommend in this update. Neil Rickert test drove openSUSE's latest beta and had issues with his NVIDIA. Jesse Smith couldn't tell what was added to Uruk over base Trisquel and Gary Newell didn't see much point to portable Porteus since most stuff didn't work. Read more Also: Indicator Sound Switcher Makes Switching Audio Devices on Ubuntu a Snap

BeagleBone Black Wireless SBC taps Octavo SiP, has open design

BeagleBoard.org’s “BeagleBone Black Wireless” SBC uses Octavo’s OSD335x SiP module and replaces the standard BeagleBone Black’s Ethernet with 2.4GHz WiFi and BT 4.1 BLE. BeagleBone Black Wireless is the first SBC to incorporate the Octavo Systems OSD335x SiP (system-in-package) module, “which integrates BeagleBone functionality into one easy-to-use BGA package,” according to BeagleBoard.org. Announced on Sep. 26, the OSD3358 SiP integrates a TI Sitara AM3358 SoC along with a TI TPS65217C PMIC, TI TL5209 LDO (low-drop-out) regulator, up to 1GB of DDR3 RAM, and over 140 passives devices including resistors, capacitors, and inductors, within a single BGA package. The Linux-driven hacker SBC also adds TI WiLink 8 WL1835MOD wireless module with 2.2 MIMO. Read more Also: Epiq Solutions' Sidekiq M.2 NAS-targeted Skylake Mini-ITX loads up on SATA, GbE, PCIe

Android Leftovers

  • 6 open source fitness apps for Android
    A key part of developing a good fitness routine is creating a solid workout plan and tracking your progress. Mobile apps can help by providing readily accessible programs specifically designed to support the user's fitness goals. In a world of fitness wearable devices like FitBit, there are plenty of proprietary apps designed to work with those specific devices. These apps certainly provide a lot of detailed tracking information, but they are not open source, and as such, do not necessarily respect the user's privacy and freedom to use their own data as they wish. The alternative is to use open source fitness apps. Below, I take a look at six open source fitness apps for Android. Most of them do not provide super detailed collection of health data, but they do provide a focused user experience, giving the user the tools to support their workouts or develop a plan and track their progress. All these apps are available from the F-Droid repository and are all licensed under the GPLv3, providing an experience that respects the user's freedom.
  • Roku Express, Roku Premiere, and Roku Ultra announced, starting at $29.99
    Roku Inc, maker of the popular Roku line of home media players, has just refreshed their entire product lineup at once. The existing lineup of flagship Roku boxes (but not the Roku Streaming Stick) has been replaced by three new products (with upgraded models for each); the Roku Express, the Roku Premiere, and the Roku Ultra.
  • This is what the Chromecast Ultra will look like
    Google is ramping up for their major October 4th event. In addition to seeing the Pixel and the Pixel XL formally unveiled, we’re also expecting a new Chromebook and the Chromecast Ultra. Until today, we had no idea what to really expect from the new Chromecast device in terms of design, but now we’re finally getting a sneak peek.
  • Android + Chrome = Andromeda; merged OS reportedly coming to the Pixel 3
    It has been almost a year since The Wall Street Journal dropped a bomb of a scoop on the Android community, saying Chrome OS would be "folded into" Android. The resulting product would reportedly bring Android to laptops and desktops. According to the paper, the internal effort to merge these two OSes had been underway for "roughly two years" (now three years) with a release planned for 2017 and an "early version" to show things off in 2016. It seems like we're still on that schedule, and now Android Police claims to have details on the new operating system—and its first launch device—coming Q3 2017.

Fedora 26 Linux OS to Ship with OpenSSL 1.1.0 by Default for Better Security

Fedora Program Manager Jan Kurik informs the Fedora Linux community about a new system-wide change for the upcoming Fedora 26 operating system, namely the addition of the OpenSSL 1.1.0 libraries by default. It appears that current Fedora Linux releases ship with OpenSSL 1.0.2h, which has been patched with the latest security fixes, but the team decided it was time to upgrade the OpenSSL libraries (libssl and libcrypto) to a newer, more advanced branch. Therefore, Fedora 26 Linux will ship with OpenSSL 1.1.0 by default, which will have a massive impact on the overall stability and security of the OS. "Update the OpenSSL library to the 1.1.0 branch in Fedora to bring multiple big improvements, new cryptographic algorithms, and new API that allows for keeping ABI stability in future upgrades. We will also add compat openssl102 package so the applications and other dependencies which are not ported yet to the new API continue to work," reads the proposal. Read more Also: GLPI version 9.1