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having a problem installing a driver.

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Hardware

Hi there linux users,

ok i'v just installed linux xp on my pc. i'm having a problem with linux xp to install a driver for my dlink network card. the model is of my dlink is DGE 530T. how do i install the driver for my network card?

p.s. i have linux xp 2006.

please help me figure this out.

i do have a read me here, i

i do have a read me here, i need your help on how to complie the patch.

everything but my network card isn't installed.

do you want me to send you the read me's so you can help me apply the drier?

re: readme

Does it say that it'll work for linux xp whatever kernel version? Does your xp install have the kernel sources either installed or available?

It doesn't say Redhat 7.3 only?

Did you try to see if skge was available on your xp install?

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

Hello, how do i install the

Hello, how do i install the drivers for my dlink?

1 more thing i am on another o.s. windows xp for the internet sorry for not putting that in. that's why i asked to need some help to know how to install my network card to be installed.

re: Hello, how do i install the

yugiohgx476 wrote:

Hello, how do i install the drivers for my dlink?

1 more thing i am on another o.s. windows xp for the internet sorry for not putting that in. that's why i asked to need some help to know how to install my network card to be installed.

Well, it appears that your card might be supported by the skge module. Only thing is, I'm not sure linux xp includes it and if it doesnt, I'm not sure (I don't recall) if they included the kernel source or made it available. Perhaps you could install a new kernel if needed. But linux xp is highly proprietary and lots of stuff isn't the same as in your more traditional linux distros. It's really only good as an introduction.

But try to:

modprobe skge

and if you see no errors, look in

cat /proc/pci

or

dmesg

and see if you see any evidence that it was recognized.

If so, how do you get connected? dhcp? you could

which dhcpcd

to see if it's included or

which dhclient

and if you find one of those, run it.

Report back after this and we'll see if there's much else we can do. Unfortunately, you picked an OS as well as a lan card that are both closed sourced and proprietary. Sad

----
You talk the talk, but do you waddle the waddle?

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