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Big oops! Leo Laporte posts love affair online.

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Humor

Big oops!!! Leo Laporte delivers technology advice to millions managed to broadcast an explicit Google chat with his lover, exposing the affair he's apparently been carrying on with his CEO.

http://gawker.com/5870610/how-the-voice-of-tech-leaked-his-own-sex-chat

Looks like someone has been very very naughty! LOL

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Dang...

...my jaw dropped...

Leo

AndrzejL wrote:
...my jaw dropped...

Leo got game!

Re: Leo

Word has it that he has been separated from his wife for about a year.

This could seriously limit Laporte's uttering any Anthony Weiner jokes while podcasting.

RE: Leo

gfranken wrote:
Word has it that he has been separated from his wife for about a year.

This could seriously limit Laporte's uttering any Anthony Weiner jokes while podcasting.

That kind of takes the fun out of it a little bit.

re: Leo

Hard to believe that in our "enlightened" society, anyone still gives a shit about who does what to who (sex-wise).

It is after all, just sex, which except for a very tiny percentage of IVF and AI babies, everyone on the planet got here because of it.

RE: LEO

In fairness, since a link to the original gawker article was posted at Tuxmachines, here is a link to Laporte's reply.

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