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OpenSUSE NFS Configuration Tutorial

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HowTos

In a heterogeneous OS environment, the network file system of choice is clearly SMB/CIFS, mostly since heterogeneous implies the existence of windows machines. Lately though, I’ve been getting a little annoyed with some of the quirks of a file-system from the single user Windows world. I also don’t have any Windows machines left. Therefore, when it came time to share one resource to multiple machines, I decided to give NFS a try.

The first step on openSUSE is to open up Yast2 and enter the software management section. Filter on packages with a name containing ‘nfs.’

Since this is a server box, I only have the console version of Yast installed. The X version will look similar. Note that the nfs-server package is not installed. This is recommended, since the kernel support for NFS is superior to the userland version. Packages you should have installed are portmap, and yast2-nfs-server. Having NTP installed running is also a good idea, otherwise you might encounter errors about files that only exist in the future.

Once you’ve installed the required packages, it’s time to open the NFS configuration wizard.

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