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today's howtos

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HowTos
  • Securely tunnel smart phone traffic with WireGuard and OpenBSD

    Learn how to securely tunnel smart phone traffic over a WireGuard VPN with an OpenBSD 6.8 endpoint using the newly released in-kernel wg(4) driver with only base utilities.

  • How to Monitor Ubuntu Performance Using Netdata

    In this article, we will see how you can install Netdata on Ubuntu to monitor real-time, performance, and health monitoring of server and applications.

  • How to Select the Best Hosting Service - RoseHosting [Ed: Maybe a tad too self-promotional]

    Choose a hosting service that will provide everything that you're looking for. These are our top factors to look out for in a hosting plan.

  • How to Use apt-cache Command in Linux

    With apt-cache command, you can search for package details in the local APT cache. Learn to use apt-cache command in this tutorial.

  • How to install Kdenlive 20.08 on a Chromebook

    Today we are looking at how to install Kdenlive 20.08 or newer on a Chromebook. Please follow the video/audio guide as a tutorial where we explain the process step by step and use the commands below.

  • How to install Xiphos on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS- A software to Study Bible - Linux Shout

    Commands to install Xiphos on Ubuntu 20.04/18.04 LTS Linux. An open source software for Linux, Windows and Uinux to study Bible.

  • How to install Zenmap Nmap GUI on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS - Linux Shout

    In simple words, the Zenmap is a graphical user interface developed for “Nmap“, a tool that we use on the command line terminal for scanning ports and networks. However, it could be difficult and cumbersome even for experienced users to use the command line for every small task, thus, in such scenarios, the Zenmap not only helps a lot but also expands the network tool with additional functions. It cross-platform GUI (Graphical User Interface) and make it very easy for beginners to use Nmap.

    When we install Zenmap it also adds the network driver WinPcap that programs such as Nmap and Wireshark need. If you don’t have any idea about Nmap, then it is a tool usually used by network security experts to analyze open ports over a network of a computer. It is a very powerful program.

  • How to use the history command on CentOS 8

    The ‘history’ command is used to display the terminal history. It keeps the history of all terminal commands executed on your system. It also allows users to replay or reuse previously executed commands on the terminal without having to type them all again. So the History command is useful in the situation when the user has forgotten a command that was previously executed on the terminal. The history of all executed commands is stored in the file ~/.bash_history. By default, the history file stores the record of all executed commands on the Linux system. If you have difficulties to check the history of all previously executed commands, this article would be useful for you. In this article we show you how to use the “history” command on your CentOS 8.0.

  • How to Install Hadoop Single Node Cluster (Pseudonode) on CentOS 7

    This article describes the process to install the Pseudonode installation of Hadoop, where all the daemons (JVMs) will be running Single Node Cluster on CentOS 7.

  • How to Install Eclipse in Ubuntu 20.04 | IT Pro

    Here are two ways to install Eclipse--and one way not to install Eclipse--in Ubuntu 20.04.

  • How to Give Your Raspberry Pi a Static IP Address – Linux Hint

    It is essential to configure a static IP address on your Raspberry Pi system if you are planning to run some kind of server software on it. This article shows you how to configure a static IP address on the Ethernet and Wi-Fi network interface of your Raspberry Pi system running the Raspberry Pi OS.

  • How to Delete a Service in Kubernetes

    Learn two ways to delete a service in Kubernetes.

    [...]

    For example, your application has groups of pods running for various sections such as a group for serving front end load to users and other group for running back end processes and a third group connecting to an external data source.

    It is services that enable connectivity between these groups of pods. You can have as many services as required within the cluster.

  • How to Create EC2 Duplicate Instance with Ansible | Linux Journal

    Many companies like mine use AWS infrastructure as a service (IaaS) heavily. Sometimes we want to perform a potentially risky operation on an EC2 instance. As long as we do not work with immutable infrastructure it is imperative to be prepared for instant revert.

    One of the solutions is to use a script that will perform instance duplication, but in modern environments, where unification is an essence it would be wiser to use more common known software instead of making up a custom script.

    Here comes the Ansible!

    Ansible is a simple automation software. It handles configuration management, application deployment, cloud provisioning, ad-hoc task execution, network automation, and multi-node orchestration. It is marketed as a tool for making complex changes like zero-downtime rolling patching, therefore we have used it for this straightforward snapshotting task.

  • How To Install Kodi on Debian 10 Buster - idroot

    In this tutorial we will show you how to install Kodi on Debian 10 Buster, as well as some extra required package by Kodi

  • Install LibreELEC on Raspberry Pi to Replace Your Smart TV OS

    Don’t like ads on your smart TV? Learn how to replace your TV OS with LibreELEC (Embedded Linux Entertainment Center) and a Raspberry Pi.

More in Tux Machines

Zotero: An Open Source App to Help You Collect & Share Research

Zotero is a completely open-source project that you can find on GitHub. It aims to help you easily collect, organize, add notes, and share your research. And, all of that without being a cloud-based service, it is completely offline. So, your research notes belong to you. Of course, unless you want to sync it for collaboration purpose, for which you may have to refer the documentation. To give you a head start, you can either opt for a WebDAV storage or just create a Zotero account to sync and share your research easily. Read more

GhostBSD 20.11.28 Release Announcement

I am happy to announce the availability of GhostBSD 20.11.28. This release comes with a new live system that leverages ZFS, compression, and replication first introduced in FuryBSD by Joe Maloney. The 20.11.28 release contains numerous improvements, including OS fixes for linuxulator to improve Linux Steam performance, an updated kernel, and GhostBSD userland updates. Userland updates include a MATE desktop upgrade to version 1.24.1, Software Station performance improvements, and numerous application updates. Read more

Linux 5.10-rc6

For the first part of the week, it really looked like things were
calming down quite nicely, and I mentally already went "Ahh,
Thanksgiving week, this is going to be a nice small, calm rc".

And then Friday rolled around, and everybody sent me their pull
requests for the week, and it all looks very normal again.

But at least this week isn't unusually bigger than normal - it's a
pretty normal rc6 stat-wise.  So unless we have some big surprising
left-overs coming up, I think we're in good shape.

And the diffstat looks nice and flat too,  which is a sign of just
widespread small fixes, rather than some big last-minute changes. The
exception is a chunk of fixes to the new vidtv driver, but that is not
only a new driver, it's a virtual test-driver for validation and
development rather than something that would affect users.

That vidtv driver shows up very clearly in the patch stats too, but
other than that it all looks very normal: mostly driver updates (even
ignoring the vidtv ones), with the usual smattering of small fixes
elsewhere - architecture code, networking, some filesystem stuff.

So I'm feeling pretty good about 5.10, and I hope I won't be proven
wrong about that. But please do test,

                 Linus

Read more

Review: Trisquel GNU/Linux 9.0

Trisquel GNU/Linux is an entirely free (libre) distribution based on Ubuntu. Trisquel offers a variety of desktop editions, all of which are stripped of non-free software components. The project is one of the few Linux distributions endorsed by the Free Software Foundation and a rare project that attempts to both be entirely free and friendly to less experienced Linux users. The Trisquel website lists several desktop editions. The main edition (which is a 2.5GB download) features the MATE desktop environment while the Mini edition is about half the size and runs LXDE. There is also a KDE Plasma edition (called Triskel) along with Trisquel TOAST which runs the Sugar learning platform. Finally, there is a minimal net-install option for people who are comfortable building their system from the ground up using a command line interface. The release announcement for Trisquel 9.0 is fairly brief and does not mention many features. The bulk of the information is provided in this paragraph: "The default web browser Abrowser, our freedom and privacy respecting take on Mozilla's browser, provides the latest updates from upstream for a great browsing experience. Backports provide extended hardware support." Though it does not appear to be mentioned specifically in the release announcement, Trisquel 9.0 looks to be based on Ubuntu 18.04 LTS packages, with some applications backported. [...] On the whole I found Trisquel to be pleasant to use, easy to set up, and pretty capable out of the box. I really like how fast it performed tasks and how uncluttered/unbusy the desktop felt. The one problem I had with Trisquel was the lack of wireless networking support. The distribution strives for software freedom (as defined by the Free Software Foundation) and this means no non-free firmware, drivers, or applications. This slightly limits its hardware support compared to most Linux distributions. It also means no easy access to applications such as Steam, Chrome, Spotify, and so on. This may make Trisquel a less practical operating system to some, but that is sort of the point: Trisquel takes a hard stance in favour of software freedom over convenience. If you are a person who does not use non-free software and doesn't need non-free wireless support, then Trisquel is probably the best experience you can have with an entirely free Linux distribution. It is painless to set up, offers several desktop flavours, and runs quickly. For free software enthusiasts I would highly recommend giving Trisquel a try. Read more