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Updated: 5 hours 22 min ago

A fully open source satellite, new resources from the Linux Foundation, and more news

7 hours 20 min ago

In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at the first open source satellite, The Linux Foundation's new IoT-focused group, and more.

Open source news roundup for April 15-28, 2017 Launching the first open source satellite

Last week, the first open source satellite made its way into space. The Libre Space Foundation, the organization behind the satellite, is dedicated to developing libre space hardware.


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The event of the year for community managers

7 hours 20 min ago

The Community Leadership Summit is one of my favorite events to attend each year. This annual gathering of community leaders is happening in Austin, Texas, on May 6-7, 2017. If your role or a future role has an inkling of community organizing involved in it, this free event (thank you sponsors) is something you should consider. Did I mention that registration is free?


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Top 5: Learn to code, innovative uses for C#, machine learning, and more

Friday 28th of April 2017 03:15:00 PM

In this week's Top 5, we have a whole heaping bucket of programmery goodness. We're controlling clouds, helping machines learn, using C#, discovering the best route to learning to code in a new language, and figuring out how to get started programming in the first place. It's the week of filling up the space in your braincase!


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6 ways to deal with difficult conversations: Share how you measure success

Friday 28th of April 2017 03:00:00 PM

Help us collect community knowledge by blogging about the weekly community management theme. Blog posts are due the following Thursday after each new theme is announced. Next week's challenge is Measuring Success.


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Creative Commons: 1.2 billion strong and growing

Friday 28th of April 2017 02:55:00 PM

"The state of the commons is strong." The 2016 State of the Commons report, issued by Creative Commons this morning, does not begin with those words, but it could. The report shows an increase in adoption for the suite of licenses, but that is not the whole story.


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4 types of OpenStack Neutron networks you must understand

Friday 28th of April 2017 07:01:00 AM

If your OpenStack hosted virtual instances need network connectivity you’re going to have to create a network. There are multiple kinds of networks and in order to make the right choice you will need to understand at least two very important network attributes: ‘router:external’ and ‘shared.’ Unless you know what these attributes and their combinations mean, it will be difficult to make the optimal network choice.


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Cross-platform development with Python and BeeWare

Friday 28th of April 2017 07:00:00 AM

If you want to develop for Android, you have to use Java. If you want to develop for iOS, you have to use Objective C. And if you want to develop for the web, you have to use JavaScript. Right?

These may be the preferred languages for these platforms, but at the end of the day, mobile phones and web browsers are computing platforms, and with a little work, you can use any language you want. With the BeeWare suite of libraries and bridges, you can use just Python. And, you can use the same code to deploy on all these platforms.


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Testing Linux hardware compatibility with USB sticks

Thursday 27th of April 2017 03:41:00 PM

Like everyone else, those of us who use Linux sometimes need to purchase a new computer. Although the days of poor hardware compatibility are long gone, it is still possible to run into issues. Just going to a local store, like Intrex here in Raleigh, or any of the big box stores, and watching the display models run Windows demo programs does not help my confidence levels about Linux support for all aspects of their hardware.


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3 Linux questions from the community

Thursday 27th of April 2017 07:02:00 AM

In the last The Queue, I flipped the script and asked you questions as opposed to answering them. It was so well received, I'm going to keep it going with three more questions this month. I'll resume answering next month, so don't forget you can fill the queue with your questions about Linux, building and maintaining communities, contributing to an open source project, and anything else you'd like to know.


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Haters gonna hate: 7 ways to deal with criticism

Thursday 27th of April 2017 07:01:00 AM

It's an unfortunate reality of sharing your work: Some people jump in to provide unwanted and unconstructive criticism. As a wise philosopher (OK, it was Taylor Swift) once put it, "Haters gonna hate, hate, hate, hate."

In healthy communities, constructive feedback (even if it's critical) will vastly outnumber the hate. Yet even in those cases, the "nonconstructive" feedback is often louder and easily gets more attention. Therefore, knowing how to "shake it off, shake it off" (to again draw from Ms. Swift's song) is important.


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3 essential skills for fostering productive debate in your IT team

Thursday 27th of April 2017 07:00:00 AM

Passionate debate fuels many open source communities and open organizations. Open and productive debate helps us refine and improve our ideas—and it ensures that everyone understands why a particular solution or idea is chosen.

Yet this kind of debate seems to be the exception rather than the rule among IT organizations. And that's a shame, because open and candid conversations lead to better and more innovative solutions.

So let's take a look at three ways that you can foster productive debate within your IT team.


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Top 4 CDN services for hosting open source libraries

Wednesday 26th of April 2017 07:02:00 AM

A CDN, or content delivery network, is a network of strategically placed servers located around the world used for the purpose of delivering files faster to users. A traditional CDN will allow you to accelerate your website's images, CSS files, JS files, and any other piece of static content. This allows website owners to accelerate all of their own content as well as provide them with additional features and configuration options. These premium services typically require payment based on the amount of bandwidth a project uses.


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How to get started learning to program

Wednesday 26th of April 2017 07:01:00 AM

There's a lot of buzz lately about learning to program.


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Users stand up, speak out, and deliver data on OpenStack growth

Wednesday 26th of April 2017 07:00:00 AM

Last week, the OpenStack Foundation announced the results of its ninth user survey. OpenStack users responded in record-breaking numbers to participate, and their voices as revealed in the data tell the real story of OpenStack.


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Book review: Hands-On Machine Learning with Scikit-Learn and TensorFlow

Tuesday 25th of April 2017 07:04:00 AM

What is the one thing in common among Google Assistant, Amazon Alexa, Microsoft Cortana, Apple Siri, or Facebook Messaging M? All of these personal assistants are powered by machine learning and artificial intelligence (AI). According to Glassdoor and Upwork.com, machine learning is an in-demand skill for 2017 and will be for many years.


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How Kubernetes is making contributing easy

Tuesday 25th of April 2017 07:03:00 AM

As the program manager of the Kubernetes community at Google, Sarah Novotny has years of experience in open source communities including MySQL and NGINX. Sarah sat down with me at CloudNativeCon in Berlin at the end of March to discuss both the Kubernetes community and open source communities more broadly.


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A new Android app for teaching kids how to read

Tuesday 25th of April 2017 07:02:00 AM

Have you been looking for software to help your child to read? Well, your quest may be over.

Phoenicia is a new literacy application for Android developed by Michael Hall, an open source software developer, community manager, and technology evangelist currently working at Canonical, maker of Ubuntu. In this interview, he talks about the diagnosis of his oldest child with an Autism Spectrum Disorder, his learning curve of Android development, and why user testing matters more than you think.


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How to make branding decisions in an open community

Tuesday 25th of April 2017 07:01:00 AM

On April 18, Docker founder Solomon Hykes made a big announcement via a pull request in the main Docker repo: "Docker is transitioning all of its open source collaborations to the Moby project going forward." The docker/docker repo now redirects to moby/moby, and Solomon's pull request updates the README and logo for the project to match.


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Making open decisions at scale

Tuesday 25th of April 2017 07:00:00 AM

In a start-up organization, anticipating how a decision will impact the people you work with is relatively easy. If you don't know, you just ask them, then make adjustments accordingly. Open conversations like these are an intuitive and expected practice in most start-up environments.

Yet as an organization grows to include more and more people, sustaining that open, flexible, and inclusive culture becomes difficult. Those sorts of practices begin to fade away if you don't deliberately work at cultivating and scaling them.


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Why and how to publish your work and opinions

Monday 24th of April 2017 08:00:00 PM

This free webinar, "Why and How to Publish Your Work and Opinions" will be given by Opensource.com Editor and Community Manager Rikki Endsley and Linux.com Editor Libby Clark.

Learn how to successfully publish your technical work and viewpoints, as well as how to identify publications to target.
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More in Tux Machines

Manjaro Linux: Reliable and Up to Date, Geekdom Optional

Regular readers can pretty much ignore this one. We’ll be back to cartoons, O’s baseball and the usual inanity soon, tomorrow in fact. I just wanted to revisit my dedication to Linux, prompted by a recent mixed bag of experiences that left me feeling even more positive about a relative newcomer to the distro scene: Manjaro. It all started a few days ago, when I decided to finally try to update the eight remaining Linux installs on my main desktop PC. I’ve been using Linux Mint (18.1 Cinnamon) as my daily driver for several months, originally in an attempt to keep my bandwidth usage to a reasonable level, and then due to inertia/lack of issues. I could have gone with my trusty Debian stable install, my go-to for years up till then, but I guess I was just getting bored. Read more

Kirigami 2.1

  • Kirigami 2.1 [Ed: post removed, maybe temporarily/by accident]
  • KDE Kirigami 2.1 Released To Help Build Convergent Linux Apps
    While convergence may be dead at Ubuntu/Canonical, KDE developers continue working on Plasma Mobile and their convergence vision driven in part by the Kirigami user-interface framework.
  • Kirigami 2.1 Open-Source Framework for Convergent Mobile and Desktop UIs Is Out
    KDE's Paul Brown announced the general availability of version 2.1 of the open-source Kirigami UI framework for producing convergent user interfaces for mobile and desktop environments. Kirigami 2.1 is here three and a half months after the launch of Kirigami 2.0 as the project's most mature version to date. Prominent features include ItemViewHeader, a standardized title for ListViews, which can be customized with a background image that uses a parallax effect when scrolled and the header is adjusted accordingly. Multiple behaviors can be set for this component.

What is SSH Key? How To Generate SSH Key in Linux?

SSH is short for Secure Shell. Secure Shell is a network protocol that provides administrators with a secure way (with encryption) to access a remote computer. it allows an administrator to log into virtual space server with an SSH key instead of a typical password. This eliminates the usual weakness of cracking passwords since SSHs almost can not be deciphered or cracked. So how exactly does this work? Let's find out in this tutorial. Read
more

today's leftovers

  • Pinebook - 1st review
    So I got the Pinebook 11 inch with arm 64 bits..... And what can I say, I am amazed with the quality of the construction. Very good plastics, better than some chromebooks and cheap windows netbooks. The mousepad is outstanding and work really nice. The keyboard, only has one problem!! The right shift. Probably I will remap the shift to the "/" position. I use and abuse right shift (i rarely use the left one), so this is very important to me.
  • DevOps lab: Learn to use GitHub for infrastructure deployments
    This article is part of a series to help IT ops professionals learn DevOps by building a home lab. In the second step, Git version control allows ops to manage infrastructure as code.
  • IBM Advances OpenWhisk Serverless Vision
    The computing paradigm commonly known as 'serverless' computing isn't for everyone, but it does have a place and plenty of opportunities for those willing to explore. IBM has its own serverless platform called OpenWhisk which first became generally available in December 2016. In a video interview with ServerWatch, Jason McGee, VP and CTO for IBM Cloud platform discusses the opportunities for serverless, event-driven computing and where the technology intersects with Watson cognitive computing and the application container revolutions.
  • Linux Foundation Announces EdgeX Foundry To Drive Standardization Of Edge Computing
  • Awesomenauts, the side-scrolling MOBA is going free to play next month
  • Everything, a game about experiencing, well, everything and it's now on Linux
    I personally tested it out and it was an absolute joy. From the very first moment, to the moment I put it down to write some thoughts it was incredible. Especially fun when it says "Everything is loaded" at the start which made me chuckle. Simple things right?
  • [New but undated] Linux distros (Linux distribution)
    A Linux distribution -- often shortened to "Linux distro" -- is a version of the open source Linux operating system that is packaged with other components, such as an installation programs, management tools and additional software such as the KVM hypervisor.
  • [Tumbleweed] Review of the weeks 2017/13 – 17
    And all this happens in parallel to the openSUSE Conference being planned. You should think about participating! It is always informative, a lot of discussions happen in face-to-face meetings and, in openSUSE’s tradition, everybody is having a lot of fun. If you can plan a visit, you absolute should do so.
  • Red Hat Gives JBoss AMQ a Makeover
    Red Hat on Thursday announced JBoss AMQ 7, a messaging platform upgrade that enhances its overall performance and improves client availability for developers. JBoss AMQ is a lightweight, standards-based open source platform designed to enable real-time communication between applications, services, devices and the Internet of Things. It is based on the upstream Apache ActiveMQ and Apache Qpid community projects.
  • Fedora Atomic Host available in Digital Ocean
  • Automated *non*-critical path update functional testing for Fedora
  • Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" Just Around the Corner, Live Images to Support UEFI
    Debian Project's Steve McIntyre and Jonathan Wiltshire just informed the Debian GNU/Linux community about some of the important aspects of the upcoming Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system, whose launch is imminent. The first aspect, revealed by Debian developer Jonathan Wiltshire, is that the final release of Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" might not include Secure Boot support, which is no longer a blocker to launch the forthcoming OS. However, Secure Boot support could be implemented sometime during the lifetime of Debian 9.