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Updated: 3 hours 51 min ago

AWOW AK41 Mini Desktop PC – Running Linux – Week 1

17 hours 55 min ago

In the first of a weekly series, Luke puts the AWOW AK41 Mini Desktop PC under the microscope. This tiny PC sports a Celeron J4115 processor, 8GB DDR4 RAM, triple display 4K@60Hz and NVMe SSD. The AWOW Mini PC has its Windows installation wiped and replaced with Linux.

The post AWOW AK41 Mini Desktop PC – Running Linux – Week 1 appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn Solidity

Tuesday 7th of July 2020 01:15:47 PM

Solidity is an object-oriented, high-level language for implementing smart contracts. Solidity was influenced by C++, Python and JavaScript. Here's our recommended tutorials to learn Solidity.

The post Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn Solidity appeared first on LinuxLinks.

24 Excellent KDE Plasma Widgets (Updated 2020)

Monday 6th of July 2020 01:34:57 PM

KDE is most of the most popular desktop environments. It's also one of the most configurable. KDE widgets (sometimes called Plasmoids) help to improve the user experience. Here's our favorites.

The post 24 Excellent KDE Plasma Widgets (Updated 2020) appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Linux at Home: Research Your Family Tree

Friday 3rd of July 2020 09:48:43 AM

The Linux at Home feature continues with a great pastime - researching your family tree.

The post Linux at Home: Research Your Family Tree appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Spotlighting the Top Open Source Crafting Tools

Thursday 2nd of July 2020 05:16:42 PM

Handicraft is a term that describes many different types of work where practical and decorative objects are made by hand or by using only simple tools. Depending on your location, the phrase 'arts and crafts' may be more commonly used.

The post Spotlighting the Top Open Source Crafting Tools appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Manage your Personal Collections – Week 36

Wednesday 1st of July 2020 10:03:30 AM

For this week's blog, Luke looks at a few best-of-breed collection management programs. Free and open source goodness as usual.

The post Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Manage your Personal Collections – Week 36 appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn D

Tuesday 30th of June 2020 08:34:00 AM

D is a general-purpose systems programming language with a C-like syntax that compiles to native code. Here's our recommended free D tutorials.

The post Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn D appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Linux Cybersecurity: What You Need to Know

Monday 29th of June 2020 12:27:42 PM

Linux is an excellent choice for anyone who wants to improve their cybersecurity. Here's what you can do to improve your cybersecurity.

The post Linux Cybersecurity: What You Need to Know appeared first on LinuxLinks.

DownZemAll! – Qt-based download manager

Monday 29th of June 2020 08:03:08 AM

This article reviews DownZemAll! (DZA!), an open source standalone download manager.

The post DownZemAll! – Qt-based download manager appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Linux at Home: Embroidery design

Friday 26th of June 2020 08:28:58 AM

Continuing in our Linux at Home series, John looks at embroidery software. Embroidery is the craft of decorating fabric or other materials using a needle to apply thread or yarn.

The post Linux at Home: Embroidery design appeared first on LinuxLinks.

9 Best File Systems for Big Data

Thursday 25th of June 2020 06:11:04 AM

This feature highlights the finest open source file systems designed to cope with the demands imposed by Big Data.

The post 9 Best File Systems for Big Data appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Terminal Emulators – Week 35

Wednesday 24th of June 2020 08:42:17 AM

For this week's blog, Luke examines terminal emulators on the Raspberry Pi 4.

The post Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Terminal Emulators – Week 35 appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn Dylan

Tuesday 23rd of June 2020 12:18:06 PM

Dylan is a multi-paradigm programming language that includes support for functional and object-oriented programming (OOP). Here's our recommended free tutorials to master Dylan.

The post Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn Dylan appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Fraidycat – organize your content

Monday 22nd of June 2020 05:52:56 AM

Fraidycat acts as a central hub for internet content. It supports a wide variety of services including Twitter, YouTube, SoundCloud, web sites, and more.

The post Fraidycat – organize your content appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Linux at Home: Collaborating in real-time

Friday 19th of June 2020 06:54:22 AM

When you work remotely, collaborating with colleagues in real-time is much more efficient than corresponding via email. The software featured in this article lets you edit documents collaboratively in real-time.

The post Linux at Home: Collaborating in real-time appeared first on LinuxLinks.

6 Sparkling Command Line Interface (CLI) Linux Time Trackers

Thursday 18th of June 2020 07:01:11 AM

Time tracking software is a type of computer software that records time spent on tasks. This category of software can enable users to run billing reports, and prepare invoices for clients.

All of the time trackers featured in this roundup are console applications, using a command-line interface.

The post 6 Sparkling Command Line Interface (CLI) Linux Time Trackers appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Desktop Searching – Week 34

Wednesday 17th of June 2020 06:45:35 AM

For this week's Raspberry Pi 4 blog, Luke puts a desktop search tool under the microscope.

The post Raspberry Pi 4: Chronicling the Desktop Experience – Desktop Searching – Week 34 appeared first on LinuxLinks.

4 Excellent Free Books to Learn Icon

Tuesday 16th of June 2020 11:12:29 AM

Icon is a high-level, general-purpose language that contains a wide variety of features for processing and presenting symbolic data — strings of characters and structures — both as text and as graphic images. Here's our recommended free books that'll help you master Icon.

The post 4 Excellent Free Books to Learn Icon appeared first on LinuxLinks.

33 Excellent GNOME Desktop Extensions (Updated 2020)

Monday 15th of June 2020 05:44:28 AM

Add additional functionality to a GNOME desktop with these great GNOME extensions. This roundup showcases 33 excellent GNOME extensions.

The post 33 Excellent GNOME Desktop Extensions (Updated 2020) appeared first on LinuxLinks.

Linux at Home: Explore the Universe from your Garden

Friday 12th of June 2020 06:34:25 AM

Astronomy is for everyone, and even with just the naked eye, it's a fascinating and rewarding hobby for life. Here's free software to get you started.

The post Linux at Home: Explore the Universe from your Garden appeared first on LinuxLinks.

More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Open Usage Commons

  • Introducing the Open Usage Commons

    Open source maintainers don’t often spend time thinking about their project’s trademarks, and with good reason: between code contribution, documentation, crafting the technical direction, and creating a healthy contributor community, there’s plenty to do without spending time considering how your project’s name or logo will be used. But trademarks – whether a name, logo, or badge – are an extension of a project’s decision to be open source. Just as your project’s open source license demonstrates that your codebase is for free and fair use, an open source project trademark policy in keeping with the Open Source Definition gives everyone – upstream contributors and downstream consumers – comfort that they are using your project’s marks in a fair and accurate way.

  • Open Usage Commons Is Google-Backed Organization For Helping With Open-Source Project Trademarks

    Open Usage Commons is a new organization announced today that is backed by Google for helping open-source projects in managing their trademarks. Open Usage Commons was started by Google in conjunction with academia, independent contributors, and others for helping to assert and manage project identities through trademark management and conformance testing.

  • The "Open Usage Commons" launches

    Google has announced the creation of the Open Usage Commons, which is intended to help open-source projects manage their trademarks.

  • Announcing a new kind of open source organization

    Google has deep roots in open source. We're proud of our 20 years of contributions and community collaboration. The scale and tenure of Google’s open source participation has taught us what works well, what doesn’t, and where the corner cases are that challenge projects.

Android Leftovers

GNOME, Linux, Qt and Git Programming

  • Philip Withnall: URI parsing and building in GLib

    Marc-André Lureau has landed GUri support in GLib, and it’ll be available in GLib 2.65.1 (due out in the next few days). GUri is a new API for parsing and building URIs, roughly equivalent to SoupURI already provided by libsoup — but since URIs are so pervasive, and used even if you’re not actually doing HTTP conversations, it makes sense to have a structured representation for them in GLib.

  • Sandboxing in Linux with zero lines of code

    Modern Linux operating systems provide many tools to run code more securely. There are namespaces (the basic building blocks for containers), Linux Security Modules, Integrity Measurement Architecture etc. In this post we will review Linux seccomp and learn how to sandbox any (even a proprietary) application without writing a single line of code.

  • Mario Sanchez Prada: ​Chromium now migrated to the new C++ Mojo types

    At the end of the last year I wrote a long blog post summarizing the main work I was involved with as part of Igalia’s Chromium team. In it I mentioned that a big chunk of my time was spent working on the migration to the new C++ Mojo types across the entire codebase of Chromium, in the context of the Onion Soup 2.0 project. For those of you who don’t know what Mojo is about, there is extensive information about it in Chromium’s documentation, but for the sake of this post, let’s simplify things and say that Mojo is a modern replacement to Chromium’s legacy IPC APIs which enables a better, simpler and more direct way of communication among all of Chromium’s different processes.

  • 6 best practices for teams using Git

    Everyone should follow standard conventions for branch naming, tagging, and coding. Every organization has standards or best practices, and many recommendations are freely available on the internet. What's important is to pick a suitable convention early on and follow it as a team. Also, different team members will have different levels of expertise with Git. You should create and maintain a basic set of instructions for performing common Git operations that follow the project's conventions.

  • Qt for MCUs 1.3 released

    Qt for MCUs 1.3 is now available in the Qt installer. Download it to get the latest improvements and create stunning GUIs with the newly available timeline animation system. Since the initial release of Qt for MCUs 1.0 back in December last year, we've been hard at work to bring new features to MCUs with the 1.1 and 1.2 releases. Efforts haven't slowed down and it's already time to bring you another batch of improvements. Besides the new features, One of the goals has been to make Qt Quick Ultralite a true subset of Qt Quick and align their QML APIs to ensure both code and skills can be reused from traditional Qt platforms to microcontrollers. With Qt for MCUs 1.3, QML code written for Qt Quick Ultralite is now source-compatible with Qt 5.15 LTS.