Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Mac

8 MacOS Like Docks for Ubuntu

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac
Ubuntu

You might not be running macOS but you’re a GNU/Linux user so you have the option to switch your style up and make your app launcher similar to the dock on macOS.

The dock apps here are top-class so don’t blame me if you have a tough time picking one of them. On the plus side, you can use them all!

Read more

Also: FAI 5.7

3 macOS Mojave Features Already Available on Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

Apple has revealed details about the next version of its desktop operating system, macOS Mojave.

As expected, macOS 10.14 is a major software upgrade. It brings a flurry new features to the fore, like better desktop organisation, auto-changing backgrounds, and a sleek new dark mode.

All very swish.

But do any of those features sound familiar to you?

They might do; many of macOS Mojave’s new features are old news to Linux users.

We’ve written about how easy it is to make Ubuntu look like a Mac before (an article we will update soon) and it’s just as easy to add familiar macOS features to the desktop too, from quick look and global menu, to launchpad and dashboard widgets.

Read more

Also: Ubuntu Server development summary – 05 June 2018

Apple and Microsoft on the Line

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
  • 2016 MacBook Pro butterfly keyboards failing twice as frequently as older models

    Apple launched its new butterfly key-switch keyboard with the MacBook, with some usability complaints starting nearly immediately, but it wasn't until its adoption in the MacBook Pro in 2016 that reliability concerns started popping up —and AppleInsider has the hard data on failure rates.

  • Apple demanding 'unnecessary' repairs before replacing iPhone batteries

    If you've forgotten, Apple was last year forced to admit that it's deliberately throttling the performance of older iPhones running newer versions of iOS. At the time, the firm justified the move by claiming it prevents processors from demanding too much power from older Lithium-ion battery packs, which degrade over time struggle to deliver the peak currents and battery life they could when new.

  • Viral Video Shows How Hard It Is to Remove Windows 10 Bloatware

    Microsoft came under fire several times for not making Windows 10 a bloat-free operating system, and despite several updates, this hasn’t changed in a substantial way since the debut of the original RTM build nearly three years ago.
    Removing the Windows 10 pre-installed apps shouldn’t be such a difficult thing to do since Microsoft itself included uninstalling options, but it’s not a secret that these items come and go with each update.

    In other words, even if you delete the pre-installed apps, they could be restored by a future update, not to say that in some cases, it’s much harder than you think to get rid of them in the first place.

    The video that you see here was posted on reddit by user drakulaboy and shows just how difficult it is to remove the apps that you don’t want in Windows 10. Uninstalling one game brings back another, and it happens in an infinite loop which for the casual user has no end.

Opposition: FOSS FUD, Microsoft Back Doors and Apple Failures

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
  • Sonatype Named IDC Innovator [Ed: Yet another one of these firms that attempt to profit from badmouthing FOSS security whilst ignoring back doors in proprietary software]
  • PyRo Mine Malware Uses NSA Tool to Collect Monero [Ed: No, it uses Windows and Microsoft back doors for the NSA.]

    Attackers are known to leverage any means available to go after cryptocurrencies, and Fortinet researchers reported this week that hackers are using a new crypto-mining malware they are calling PyRo Mine to quietly collect Monero.

    The Python-based malware uses an NSA exploit to spread to Windows machines while also disabling security software and allowing the exfiltration of unencrypted data. By also configuring the Windows Remote Management Service, the machine becomes vulnerable to future attacks.

    "Researchers have discovered malware authors using the ETERNALBLUE exploit in cryptocurrency mining malware, such as Adylkuzz, Smominru, and WannaMine. PyRo Mine uses the ETERNALROMANCE exploit," wrote Fortinet security researcher Jasper Manuel in his blog.

    The malicious URL with a downloadable zip file compiled with PyInstaller is dangerous because it packages Python programs into stand-alone executable so that the attacker does not need to install Python on the machine to execute the program.

  • My iPhone 8 Just Failed a Durability Test and All I Think Of Is Bendgate 2

    Apple gave up on aluminum for the new iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X in favor of glass, a more exquisite material which not only makes the device look more premium, but also allows for other features like wireless charging.
    A side-effect of having a phone with a body made of glass is that it is incredibly slippery, so it’s extremely easy to drop it to the ground, which in the case of glass is obviously something you should avoid.

    Apple has paid particular attention to this thing and tried to make the glass as durable as possible, while also improving the metal frame that’s still being used on all three models to be as tough as possible.

    At first glance, all these efforts paid off. Torture tests performed by so many people after the launch of these models proved that all three iPhones are extremely durable and they can withstand shocks and hits that they wouldn’t normally be exposed to. Furthermore, what these tests have shown was that new-generation iPhones are no longer prone to bending, a problem that affected the iPhone 6 Plus and which Apple first addressed with the release of the 6s upgrade.

  • Apple discontinues its AirPort WiFi routers

Apple Threats

Filed under
Mac
  • Apple threatens leakers with criminal action in leaked memo – report

     

    The memo about leaking, which was leaked to Bloomberg and published on Friday, threatened employees with criminal consequences and shines a harsh light on the Silicon Valley company’s aggressive surveillance of its own employees and intensive investigative efforts to catch and punish leakers.  

  • In a Leaked Memo, Apple Warns Employees to Stop Leaking Information

     

    The Cupertino, California-based company said in a lengthy memo posted to its internal blog that it "caught 29 leakers," last year and noted that 12 of those were arrested. "These people not only lose their jobs, they can face extreme difficulty finding employment elsewhere," Apple added. The company declined to comment on Friday.

  • Apple's memo warning employees about leaking information is predictably leaked

    An internal memo warning Apple employees that leaking information could result in legal action and criminal charges has, rather predictably, been leaked.

  • Apple Sued an Independent iPhone Repair Shop Owner and Lost

    Last year, Apple’s lawyers sent Henrik Huseby, the owner of a small electronics repair shop in Norway, a letter demanding that he immediately stop using aftermarket iPhone screens at his repair business and that he pay the company a settlement.

    Norway’s customs officials had seized a shipment of 63 iPhone 6 and 6S replacement screens on their way to Henrik’s shop from Asia and alerted Apple; the company said they were counterfeit.

    In order to avoid being sued, Apple asked Huseby for “copies of invoices, product lists, order forms, payment information, prints from the internet and other relevant material regarding the purchase [of screens], including copies of any correspondence with the supplier … we reserve the right to request further documentation at a later date.”

Why Classrooms Are Apple, Google and Microsoft's Next Big Battleground

Filed under
Linux
Google
Microsoft
Mac

Google’s Chromebooks accounted for 59.6% of mobile computing shipments in the kindergarten through 12th grade market in the fourth quarter of 2017, according to Futuresource Consulting. By comparison, Windows accounted for 25.6% and iOS comprised 10.6% of shipments.

Among the reasons tech giants are scrambling to get their gadgets into schools: It’s a big business opportunity. The education technology market is expected to reach $252 billion by 2020, according to a report published by education-focused technology conference host EdTechXGlobal and advisory firm IBIS Capital. But there’s potential upside even after students leave the classroom and turn into fully-fledged consumers, too. “It gets people using your technology young,” says Avi Greengart, research director for consumer platforms and devices for GlobalData. “The hope is that they stick with it.”

Read more

A Year Away From Mac OS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

This is the fifth post in my series on finding an alternative to Mac OS X.

A bit over a year ago I wrote about my search for an alternative to Mac OS and switch to Linux. In this post I reflect on how that year went and detail some further adventures into Mac OS alternatives.

Read more

Apple Code Accidentally 'Liberated'

Filed under
Mac
Security

Apple Woes (Due to Competition From Android/Linux)

Filed under
Mac
  • iPhone ‘Super Cycle’ Pronounced Dead

    The iPhone “super cycle” -- a wave of upgrades and new customers that was supposed to wash over Apple Inc. this year with the introduction of its model X -- was pronounced dead on arrival.

    In Apple’s first earnings report since the launch of the pricey flagship smartphone, the company reported lower-than-expected handset sales from the holiday period. Chief Financial Officer Luca Maestri also forecast a decline in the average selling price of iPhones in the current quarter, suggesting the most-expensive models aren’t as popular.

  • Apple sells fewer phones but profits rise
  • iPhone sales down, but revenue up in latest quarter

    Apple sold less iPhones in the latest quarter but earned a lot more than a year ago, given the price of its iPhone X began at US$1000, according to the company's results for the first fiscal quarter of 2018. The user base of active devices rose to 1.3 billion in January.

  • Apple Says It Will Implement Toggle Option for iPhone Slowdowns Next Month

    Apple has confirmed the investigations launched by the US government over slowing down of customer's iPhone devices without being more transparent and says the promised power management features are coming next month.

    As you may be aware, Apple released last year a new software update that implemented a so-called feature which slowed down the performance of certain iPhone 6 and iPhone 6s devices with degrated batteries under cold weather and when the battery charge was low.

    The feature was extended to iPhone 7 models as well a year later, and discovered by accident after some users reported slowdowns on their older iPhone devices. Apple wasn't really transparent about this feature, even so Apple CEO Tim Cook said in an interview earlier this month that they said so in the release notes of the respective iOS update.

    Anyway, when Apple came clean about slowing down older iPhone devices, numerous customers sued the company, and it now looks like even the U.S. government is asking them about the handling of older iPhone batteries and their transparency to customers, as Bloomberg reported earlier this week.

Phones: Huawei (Android) Sanctions, Apple Sales Collapse, and the Linux-powered “$10 iPhone” in 2020?

Filed under
Android
Linux
Mac
  • Now Verizon drops plans to sell Huawei phones in USA

    CES 2018 was supposed to mark Huawei’s proper entry into the US market, teaming up with major networks to sell phones on contract.

    Unfortunately, AT&T pulled out of the deal in the days before CES, apparently due to US government pressure. It all made for a rather awkward speech by Huawei’s Richard Yu.

    Now, Bloomberg reports that fellow US network Verizon has also decided to drop Huawei phones. The publication, citing “people familiar with the matter”, said this was due to pressure from the US government as well.

  • Apple to Cut iPhone X Production in the Face of Weak Demand

    Apple Inc. is slashing planned production of the iPhone X for the three-month period ending March 31, people familiar with the matter say, in a sign of weaker-than-expected demand for the pricey handset.

  • Top iPhone Suppliers Warn of Slower Sales Ahead of Apple Results

    Some of Apple’s iPhones are built with Qualcomm’s modems, which are chips for connecting to cellular networks. The San Diego-based chipmaker said Wednesday that orders from a large “thin modem” customer tailed off at worse-than-typical levels in the quarter. It was widely interpreted that the customer is Apple.

  • Apple tells U.S. government it isn't slowing old iPhones to get people to buy new ones

    Apple has confirmed the U.S. government is investigating the company after it was discovered Apple slowed down (a.k.a "throttled") older iPhones. The U.S. Department of Justice and the Securities and Exchange Commission are reportedly probing the company, though Apple wouldn't confirm any specific agencies.

    The tech giant, however, has denied any malicious intent, and reiterated that "we have never — and would never — do anything to intentionally shorten the life of any Apple product, or degrade the user experience to drive customer upgrades."

  • Are We Going To See The “$10 iPhone” in 2020? No, the clone of 2010 superphones will probably cost around $20 in 2020

    To be clear, right from the start, I emphasized, that Apple will not sell us a $10 iPhone in year 2020. I said it would be a clone-phone-maker, probably running Android or possibly one of the low-cost smartphone OS systems that were then in development. But 8 years ago, in year 2010, if you went into a mobile phone shop anywhere, and picked the top model, you’d get roughly the same specs, which were: [...]

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Games: Spearmint, Rise to Ruins, Depth of Extinction, Puzlogic, Never Split the Party, Godot Engine, DXVK

  • Ioquake3-Derived Spearmint 1.0 Engine Coming Next Month, But Ceasing Development
    Spearmint, an enhanced version of the open-source ioquake3 engine in turn derived from the id Tech 3 source code, will see the big "1.0" milestone in October. But that will also coincide with the developer and ioquake3 maintainer ceasing work on this engine now with an eighteen year lineage.
  • Village building god sim 'Rise to Ruins' had an absolutely massive update
    Rise to Ruins, a village builder that mixes in some god sim fun just went through a bit of an evolution with the latest patch, which really is absolutely massive. In terms of file-size the patch was relatively small, but good things come in small packages!
  • Roguelike RPG 'Depth of Extinction' is nearing release with a launch trailer
    I'm personally very excited about Depth of Extinction, a roguelike RPG with turn-based battles and an interesting setting. The release is closing in for this month and they have a new launch trailer. Note: This was a personal purchase for me.
  • Puzlogic combines elements from Sudoku and Kakuro to make an interesting puzzle game
    Puzlogic from developer Eduardo Barreto was released on Steam back in July and it just recently gained Linux support. It combines elements from Sudoku and Kakuro along with some lovely ambient music to create a pretty decent and relaxing experience. Currently in Early Access, the developer expects the full release to be available in the first part of 2019.
  • Never Split the Party, a free online team-based action-RPG is now on Linux
    Never one to pass up trying out a free game, today I tested out some of Never Split the Party, an "an ultra social rogue-like" and it's not bad. While the game is free to play, you only get given one single character. If you want access to the others, you need to buy the Fellowship DLC which will unlock the Cleric, Rogue, Mage, Ranger and Mercenary.
  • Godot Engine 3.1 will have support for simplex noise generation which looks incredibly useful
    Godot Engine 3.1 [Official Site], the big upgrade coming to the open source game engine has gained another exciting feature with simplex noise generation.
  • One of the fine folks in the Intel Mesa driver team has written up a post on their work improving games in DXVK
    Writing on their personal blog, Jason Ekstrand from the Intel Mesa team has written up some information on what they've been doing to improve the Intel drivers on Linux. What they're talking about isn't exactly new, since the fixes are already in Mesa but it's nice to get some information about how they came across the issues and what they did to solve them. Regardless of your feelings towards Wine, DXVK, Steam Play and so on, no one can ignore the benefits they bring to the people actually working on the drivers. Giving them so many more ways to test and push Linux graphics drivers is a good thing, as it means we can end up with much better drivers for all sorts of workloads (not just gaming!).

LLVM 7.0.0 Released

  • LLVM 7.0.0 released
    The release contains the work on trunk up to SVN revision 338536 plus work on the release branch. It is the result of the community's work over the past six months, including: function multiversioning in Clang with the 'target' attribute for ELF-based x86/x86_64 targets, improved PCH support in clang-cl, preliminary DWARF v5 support, basic support for OpenMP 4.5 offloading to NVPTX, OpenCL C++ support, MSan, X-Ray and libFuzzer support for FreeBSD, early UBSan, X-Ray and libFuzzer support for OpenBSD, UBSan checks for implicit conversions, many long-tail compatibility issues fixed in lld which is now production ready for ELF, COFF and MinGW, new tools llvm-exegesis, llvm-mca and diagtool. And as usual, many optimizations, improved diagnostics, and bug fixes.
  • LLVM 7.0 Released: Better CPU Support, AMDGPU Vega 20; Clang 7.0 Gets FMV & OpenCL C++
    As anticipated, LLVM release manager Hans Wennborg announced the official availability today of LLVM 7.0 compiler stack as well as associated sub-projects including the Clang 7.0 C/C++ compiler front-end, Compiler-RT, libc++, libunwind, LLDB, and others. There is a lot of LLVM improvements ranging from CPU improvements for many different architectures, Vega 20 support among many other AMDGPU back-end improvements, the new machine code analyzer utility, and more. The notable Clang C/C++ compiler has picked up support for function multi-versioning (FMV), initial OpenCL C++ support, and many other additions. See my LLVM 7.0 / Clang 7.0 feature overview for more details on the changes with this six-month open-source compiler stack update.

Android Leftovers

The Future of Open Source

Linux and the open source business model are far different today than many of the early developers might have hoped. Neither can claim a rags-to-riches story. Rather, their growth cycles have been a series of hit-or-miss milestones. The Linux desktop has yet to find a home on the majority of consumer and enterprise computers. However, Linux-powered technology has long ruled the Internet and conquered the cloud and Internet of Things deployments. Both Linux and free open source licensing have dominated in other ways. Microsoft Windows 10 has experienced similar deployment struggles as proprietary developers have searched for better solutions to support consumers and enterprise users. Read more