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Proprietary Software Security

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
Security
  • OMIGOD: Azure users running Linux VMs need to update now [Ed: They need to abandon Microsoft Azure and get reprimanded by the employer for ever choosing this NSA company as a host in the first place]
  • Microsoft September 2021 Patch Tuesday: Remote code execution flaws in MSHTML, OMI fixed
  • Microsoft Patch Tuesday, September 2021 Edition

    Microsoft today pushed software updates to plug dozens of security holes in Windows and related products, including a vulnerability that is already being exploited in active attacks. Also, Apple has issued an emergency update to fix a flaw that’s reportedly been abused to install spyware on iOS products, and Google‘s got a new version of Chrome that tackles two zero-day flaws. Finally, Adobe has released critical security updates for Acrobat, Reader and a slew of other software.

  • Apple Patches Up Devices In Response To The Exposure Of Yet Another NSO Group Exploit

    Israeli digital arms merchant NSO Group continues to sell its malware to a wide variety of governments. The governments it sells to, which includes a bunch of notorious human rights abusers, continue to use these exploits to target dissidents, activists, journalists, religious leaders, and political opponents. And the manufacturers of the devices exploited by governments to harm people these governments don't like (NSO says "criminals and terrorists," long-term customers say "eh, whoever") continue to patch things up so these exploits no longer work.

  • It's not just you: Emergency software patches are on the rise

    Researchers raised the alarm Monday about a big one: The Israeli spyware company NSO Group, which sells programs for governments to remotely take over people’s smartphones and computers, had figured out a new way into practically any Apple device by sending a fake GIF through iMessage. The only way to guard against it is to install Apple’s emergency software update.

  • Apple Rushes Out Emergency Update to Stop ‘No Click’ Spyware

    The flaw, disclosed Monday by Citizen Lab, allowed a hacker using NSO’s Pegasus malware to gain access to a device owned by an unnamed Saudi activist, according to security researchers. Apple said the flaw could be exploited if a user on a vulnerable device received a “maliciously crafted” PDF file.

Gnome 3 compare to MacOs

Filed under
Mac
GNOME

An assertion I have made in the past is that to me “Gnome 3 feels like MacOs with rough edges”. After some discussions with others, I’m finally going to write this up with examples.

It’s worth pointing out that in my opinion, Gnome 3 is probably still the best desktop experience on Linux today for a variety of reasons - it’s just that for me, these rough edges really take away from that being a good experience for me.

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Get macOS ‘Quick Look’ on Ubuntu with GNOME Sushi

Filed under
Mac
GNOME
Ubuntu

Sometimes file thumbnails in Nautilus aren’t enough. Sometimes you need a closer look at a file, photo, or folder to make sure it’s the one you actually want, but without the hassle of opening a full-blown app to find out.

And that’s where GNOME Sushi comes in.

GNOME Sushi is an alternative to macOS ‘Quick Look‘ for Linux desktops that use Nautilus, aka GNOME’s famous file manager.

You select a file in Nautilus, tap the spacebar, and an instantaneous (and usually interactive) preview of the file appears — no need to open a full app.

Sushi supports file previews for most plain-text documents, including scripts with syntax highlighting, as well PDFs, HTML files, and LibreOffice documents. Music and video file previews use the GStreamer framework to let you to seek/scrub through them.

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Microsoft Windows and Apple as Liabilities

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
  • Energy secretary backs ban on ransomware payments: 'You are encouraging the bad actors'

    Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm said Sunday that she supports a law that would ban companies from paying ransom to [crackers] holding their information hostage after a recent spate of cyberattacks on companies responsible for crucial parts of the U.S. infrastructure.

    In an interview on NBC's "Meet the Press," Granholm acknowledged that she is not sure whether Congress or President Joe Biden are ready to take that step, but she warned that paying ransom only emboldens [crackers]. And she said private companies need to take responsibility and tell the government when they are attacked for the good of the country.

  • US recovers millions in cryptocurrency paid to Colonial Pipeline [crackers] [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Colonial Pipeline, a network that provides around 45 percent of the East Coast’s fuel, was the target of a crippling cyberattack last month that forced it to shut down operations for several days.

    Joseph Blount, the company’s CEO, later revealed in an interview with The Wall Street Journal that he authorized the company to pay the cyber criminals behind the attack the equivalent of $4.4 million in bitcoin on the day of the breach in exchange for the keys to decrypt the network.

    The FBI recommends against paying the ransom, as it may encourage the [attackers] to go after another group, and the payment may be used for criminal operations. The Biden administration has reiterated this stance in recent weeks.

  • US Snatches Back Ransom from Colonial Pipeline [Crackers] [iophk: Windows TCO]

    U.S. law enforcement officials say they have hit back at the Russian-based criminal network that caused gas pipelines to shut down across parts of the country last month, seizing much of the multimillion-dollar ransom payment before it could be used.

    The Justice Department announced Monday it recovered $2.3 million of the approximately $5 million Colonial Pipeline paid to the DarkSide Network following the ransomware attack, which resulted in fuel shortages along the U.S. East Coast.

  • Feds recover millions from pipeline ransom [crackers], hint at U.S. [Internet] tactic [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The FBI was able to seize control of DarkSide's proceeds by gaining access to a central account holding about 63.7 bitcoins, worth around $2.3 million, Deputy Director Paul Abbate said. A court document said that the seizure took place in Northern California, putting it within reach of U.S. law, and that the FBI was able to access the "private key," or password, for one of the gang's bitcoin wallets. It was unclear how the key was compromised.

  • Adversaries Could Shut Down US Power Grid, Energy Secretary Says [iophk: Windows TCO]

    When Granholm was asked by CNN’s Jake Tapper about vulnerabilities in the electricity grid and whether a foreign actor has the ability to shut it down, Granholm said, “Yeah, they do. There are thousands of attacks on all aspects of the energy sector and the private sector generally.”

  • Senate sergeant at arms says cyberattack more worrisome than repeat of Jan. 6 insurrection [iophk: Windows TCO]

    Senate Sergeant at Arms Karen Gibson said Saturday she is more concerned about a cyberattack on the government than another insurrection like the one that rocked Capitol Hill on Jan. 6.

  • First Known Malware Surfaces Targeting Windows Containers

    Organizations running Windows containers in their Kubernetes cluster have a brand-new threat to worry about.

    Researchers from Palo Alto Networks (PAN) have discovered what they say is the first known malware targeting Windows containers. The malware, named Siloscape, is designed to escape from a Windows container into the Kubernetes node so it can spread in the cluster.

    Attackers can use the malware to carry out a variety of malicious actions, such as credential and data theft, deploying ransomware, and breaching enterprise software development and testing environments.

    Daniel Prizmant, senior staff researcher at PAN's Unit 42 threat intelligence team, says the malware is a manifestation of the growing attacker focus on cloud environments. "Attackers are undergoing their own digital transformation and exploiting the massive enterprise shift to the cloud and new technologies like containers," he says. "As a result, container security has become important."

  • Apple pays millions to woman after explicit photos posted online

    Apple paid millions of dollars to a student after iPhone repair technicians posted explicit photos and videos from her phone to Facebook, legal documents have revealed.

    The tech giant agreed a settlement with the 21-year-old after two employees at a repair facility uploaded the images from a phone she had sent to Apple to be fixed, resulting in “severe emotional distress”.

    The incident, which occurred in 2016 at a centre in California run by Pegatron, an Apple contractor, is one of the most significant privacy violations to be revealed at an iPhone repair facility.

  • Student's nude photos leaked to Facebook by iPhone service centre, Apple now paying her millions of dollars

    The confidentiality agreement was meant to avoid “substantial business harm”, as Apple insisted on confidentiality throughout the settlement. For this reason, Apple was simply referred to as a “customer” throughout the proceedings.

    The tech major was only recently named as the customer during a separate, unrelated lawsuit it faced. Apple confirmed the incident to The Telegraph.

    The confidentiality agreement left many details of the incident hidden. What is known is that the two employees have been fired after an “exhaustive” investigation by Apple. Apple has also been reimbursed for the settlement by Pegatron. Pegatron and its insurers, who refused to pay the bill, have now settled the matter privately.

    The incident shows a glaring loophole in the tall claims repeatedly made by Apple over the strict control of its repair facilities. The company has often cited this as an argument against legislation that would make it easier for third parties to fix its devices. It seems like Apple’s case does not seem too strong if such incidents can occur within the company’s well-monitored facilities.

  • Apple settles with student after authorized repair workers leaked her naked pics to her Facebook page

Proprietary Software, Security, and Monopoly

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
Security
  • Cyber-Attack on Air India Led to Data Leak of 4.5 Million Fliers

    [Attackers] infiltrated the servers of Air India Ltd. and gained access to personal data of 4.5 million fliers, the nation’s flag carrier said.

    Personal data of passengers registered between August 2011 and February 2021 were compromised in the attack, the carrier said in a note to fliers that was shared via Twitter. The details included credit card and contact information and frequent flier data.

  • Ransomware Moves from ‘Economic Nuisance’ to National Security Threat [iophk: Windows TCO]

    https://www.voanews.com/silicon-valley-technology/ransomware-moves-economic-nuisance-national-security-threat

    [...]

    While Blount, the Colonial Pipeline CEO, defended his decision to pay a ransom as “the right thing to do for the country,” law enforcement officials and cybersecurity experts say such hefty payments embolden cyber criminals to carrying out more attacks.

  • FBI warns Conti ransomware gang struck health and emergency networks [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The Federal Bureau of Investigation said that the same group of online extortionists blamed for striking the Irish health system last week have also hit at least 16 U.S. medical and first response networks in the past year.

    In an alert made public Thursday by the American Hospital Association, the FBI said the cybercriminals using the malicious software dubbed ‘Conti’ have targeted law enforcement, emergency medical services, dispatch centers, and municipalities.

    The alert did not name the victims or go into detail about the nature or severity of the breaches, saying only that they were among more than 400 organizations worldwide targeted by “Conti actors.”

  • Application Compatibility Hell: Microsoft set to remove Internet Explorer from Windows 10. (But 99% of it will linger.)

    Even NPR commented on Microsoft getting ready to remove Internet Explorer from Windows 10, but I thought I’d chime in and mention that you can do that today if you want to.

    Microsoft Edge has a thing called Internet Explorer Mode that can reload a site using the Trident engine from Internet Explorer.

    Due to the architecture of Internet Explorer, Trident is an embeddable component and Internet Explorer is just a small shell around that component. Internet Explorer Mode does not require the “Internet Explorer 11” feature to be turned on, so you can “remove” Internet Explorer and this Mode will still work in Microsoft Edge, should you turn it on.

    I’ve been trying out opening sites in IE Mode in Edge, and it’s pretty clear that Trident has aged quite badly and the only reason why you’d ever do this is if you ended up with some crap web application that nobody is going to fix anytime soon. Like the beneficiary enrollment page on One Walmart.

  • QBittorrent Developer: “Apple app notarization is extortion pretending to be security. Issue closed.” Bonus: Ancient operating systems. (Windows)

    A developer of the popular Bittorrent protocol client “QBittorrent” closed the “Won’t run on macOS Catalina” bug (due to Apple’s fake security scam of software signing+notarization) by closing the issue.

    After a discussion, it wasn’t even about the $100 a year it would cost to get to get an Apple developer account so they could give a program away for free, or wondering if they could even get Apple to sign off on a Bittorrent app if they did, but that the infrastructure that you have to put in place to build, sign, and notarize Mac apps is daunting and not worth the pitiful amount of Mac users that it would bring in.

    So, the way to make it run is still turn off Gatekeeper, at least for however long Apple allows it.

    It’s not really your computer anyway. It ain’t done til GNU/Linux won’t run…. Oh wait, this too has happened.

  • Federal Judge unimpressed with Tim Cook’s testimony.

    Per NPR, the first day of testimony in Epic’s lawsuit against Apple did not go well for CEO Tim Cook.

    It seems that the judge was the most skeptical of Cook’s arguments that the program that reduces “commissions” to Apple for small developers were sufficient, or that consumers had sufficient choice in the In-App Payments market because Android phones exist.

    Of course, that argument is ridiculous. Google’s commissions are exactly the same. The issue here is that the commissions themselves are too high and raise prices for the user. When Epic put it’s own in-app payment system into Fortnite, it passed some of the savings to the user. It cost 20% less than paying through Apple or Google.

    Jamie Zawinski had previously complained that Apple deliberately did things to discourage developers from giving away apps for iOS that are really free. For example, Google charges $25 once to get a Google developer account, and Apple charges $100 a year. Apple pressures people to make money so that they can take 30% of it.

    NPR goes on to mention the fact that iPhone sales have been stagnant for years. This is true, and there has not been a “next product” because Apple isn’t an innovative company. If they lose the in-app purchase revenue, money they are effectively stealing from their user (since the developer isn’t just absorbing it), they hit the skids.

  • “Tim Apple” testifies in court on the App Store monopoly.

    Today, Tim Cook (“Tim Apple” as Trump called him), testifies on Apple’s App Store monopoly.

    Of course, people should know that they’re going to try to excuse their behavior on creating a “good experience” for users and to “keep things safe” from malware, and from a child that may not use the computer correctly.

    The problem with this model is that Apple has been using their monopoly to profit from doing essentially nothing except imposing ridiculous rules on app developers, censoring apps, and taking nearly a third of gross sales for providing a distribution service.

    Apple’s model makes the user lose on numerous fronts, and it makes software more expensive and costs jobs in the economy.

    They also can’t guarantee it’s secure. At issue is Fortnite adding its own payment method to bypass Apple’s store siphoning off their revenues.

    How did it get past app review? The code was set to do nothing for a while, so that it would get through the review and then activate later.

    If a payment mechanism can do that, so can malware, and once malware runs on a device it’s too late. It can gain more permissions by exploiting bugs in the firmware, and become a rootkit. At that point, it would be difficult for Apple to even get rid of it.

  • Tim Cook’s Fortnite trial testimony was unexpectedly revealing

    Epic mustered its own arguments: people can still choose to keep their phones locked down, and they might want to access stores with even more carefully curated apps or even better privacy controls. It’s previously accused Apple of hypocrisy, pointing out anecdotal failures to catch specific apps (like a game called Ganja Farmer: Weed Empire) that violate App Store guidelines. “It’s not 100 percent. It’s not perfect. You will find mistakes being made,” Cook said when Apple’s counsel asked about those incidents. “But if you back up and look at it in the scheme of things, with 1.8 million or so apps on the store, we do a really good job.”

  • Apple's Tim Cook grilled by judge overseeing Epic's Fortnite trial

    Apple says its control over the App Store promises security and reliability for users. Epic says it stifles competition.

  • Apple App Store profits look 'disproportionate,' U.S. judge tells CEO Cook
  • FOSS Patents: Friday for Fortnite

    No, I don't want to gloat, but it's mind-boggling what happened yesterday in that Oakland courtroom at the end of the main part (they're done apart from closing arguments on Monday) of the Epic Games v. Apple App Store antitrust trial. It's fair to say that at this point the question is most likely about remedies. Epic is on the winning track with respect to liability as Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers of the United States District Court for the Northern District of California laid bare the bankruptcy of Apple's defenses. Being an App Store complainant myself (though I tried what I could to work things out), that's what I had hoped, but the hurdle was and remains high.

    After my final pretrial post and Twitter thread, I didn't comment on the trial itself or on the issues in it. I just noted some suspicious Twitter activity.

    I dialed in only for opening statements (followed by Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney's testimony, which was almost inaudible) and for Apple CEO Tim Cook's testimony yesterday. In between, I just read other people's tweets (mostly not even in real time), particularly the ones by Protocol's Nick Statt (here's his report on how the judge "saved her best for last") and The Verge's Adi Robertson (here's his article, which contains a partial transcript of how Judge YGR grilled Tim Cook), but also others.

    After the first couple of days, I was profoundly worried. The judge had tough questions for Epic, and some of the answers might have been tactically suboptimal. The inflection point in the early phase of the trial was the testimony of Lori Wright, a Microsoft Xbox exec. As far as I could see on Twitter, it was just perfect and definitely eye-opening.

Restore an old MacBook with Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Hardware
Mac

Last year, I wrote about how you can give new life to an old MacBook with Linux, specifically Elementary OS in that instance. Recently, I returned to that circa 2015 MacBook Air and discovered I had lost my login password. I downloaded the latest Elementary OS 5.1.7 Hera release and could not get the live boot to recognize my Broadcom 4360 wireless chipset.

Lately, I have been using Linux Mint to refurbish older laptops, and I thought I would give it a try on this MacBook Air. I downloaded the Linux Mint 20.1 ISO and created a USB boot drive using the Popsicle software on my Linux desktop computer.

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Complexities in bringing Linux to Apple’s M1 Macs

Filed under
Linux
Mac

  • Open-source team details the complexities in bringing Linux to Apple’s M1 Macs

    The crowdfunding Asahi Linux project has published the first progress report detailing its effort to port Linux to the Apple Silicon platform with the M1 Macs. Apple’s new processor architecture is creating some difficulties…

  • Porting operating systems to Apple Silicon leagues harder than migrating software

    In its introduction of Apple Silicon to developers, Apple has provided assistance to developers to port their Intel-compatible apps over to M1. For developers performing more ambitious feats, such as porting Linux over to Apple Silicon, the task is multiple times harder.

    In a blog post about the Asahi Linux project, the team discusses its findings in trying to set up an alternative boot kernel on Apple Silicon systems. While most of the feature has been implemented, the lack of support for a command that allows the installation of a non-Apple kernel led to an attempt to document the undocumented system.

    The main hurdle faced was that Apple Silicon boots differently from PCs, and works "more akin to embedded platforms" like Android or iOS devices. There are differences and a "few bespoke mechanisms" in use, though Apple apparently made the boot process "feel closer" to an Intel Mac.

  • Open-Source Team Describes the Difficulties to Port Linux on M1 Macs

    Apple introduced the M1-powered Macs last year and the machines received a pretty good rating overall. To be exact, the M1 series flaunted enhanced performance and battery life. While the industry is yet to follow Apple's footsteps. Apart from software support, developers around the world are working to take advantage of the Apple Silicon. The crowdfunding Asahi Linux project published a new progress report that shares details on the complexities of port Linux on M1 Macs.

The problems with Apple aren't just outages, they are injustices

Filed under
GNU
Mac

This November, both everyday users and privacy advocates found new reasons to be concerned about Apple. After an update to the latest version of their operating system, users found that they were unable to launch applications that were not written by Apple itself. This problem was caused by an Apple server outage. But why did the unavailabilty of a remote server prevent a user from launching a program on their own computer?

It turns out that each time a program is opened on macOS, it phones home via the Online Certificate Status Protocol (OCSP) to see if that application is "okay" to launch: it asks the corporation permission each time a new application is encountered, sending potentially identifying information along with that request. While this function only made news because of the recent server outage caused by the release of the newest version of macOS, Big Sur, research indicates that the report-back has existed in the operating system since September 2018, with the release of macOS Mojave. This is a classic case of proprietary software serving as an instrument of unjust power.

Although Apple does not directly receive the name of the application, but rather information on who developed it, most developers have only a very limited number of apps on the App Store, making it easy for Apple to infer. More disturbing yet is the other identifying information that is sent along with the request, which includes the user's approximate location and the current date and time.

Because macOS is so restricted, it leaves everyone, including free software developers, powerless to help users prevent their application use from being reported back to Apple. Due to the way the system is engineered, free software firewalls like LuLu are unable to block the information from being sent to Apple domains. Furthermore, the information is sent unencrypted over the network, potentially allowing a snoop to see which applications a user was trying to launch on their own computer. The request also bypasses any VPN, letting Apple know their approximate location even if the user has taken steps to stay anonymous.

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macOS to FreeBSD migration a.k.a why I left macOS

Filed under
Mac
BSD

I think the title tells a lot about the story I’m going to tell you.

This is not a technical documentation for how I migrated from macOS to FreeBSD. This is a high-level for why I migrated from macOS to FreeBSD.

Not so long ago, I was using macOS as my daily driver. The main reason why I got a macbook was the underlying BSD Unix and the nice graphics it provides. Also, I have an iPhone. But they were also the same reasons for why I left macOS.

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Also: Fiddling with OpenBSD ports

macOS to FreeBSD migration a.k.a why I left macOS

Filed under
Mac
BSD

This is not a technical documentation for how I migrated from macOS to FreeBSD. This is a high-level for why I migrated from macOS to FreeBSD.

Not so long ago, I was using macOS as my daily driver. The main reason why I got a macbook was the underlying BSD Unix and the nice graphics it provides. Also, I have an iPhone. But they were also the same reasons for why I left macOS.

I did not want to write this post right after the migration, I wanted to take my time, use FreeBSD daily, see if I will ever miss macOS.

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Programming Leftovers

  • Announcement : An AArch64 (Arm64) Darwin port is planned for GCC12

    As many of you know, Apple has now released an AArch64-based version of macOS and desktop/laptop platforms using the ‘M1’ chip to support it. This is in addition to the existing iOS mobile platforms (but shares some of their constraints). There is considerable interest in the user-base for a GCC port (starting with https://gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=96168) - and, of great kudos to the gfortran team, one of the main drivers is folks using Fortran. Fortunately, I was able to obtain access to one of the DTKs, courtesy of the OSS folks, and using that managed to draft an initial attempt at the port last year (however, nowhere near ready for presentation in GCC11). Nevertheless (as an aside) despite being a prototype, the port is in use with many via hombrew, macports or self-builds - which has shaken out some of the fixable bugs. The work done in the prototype identified three issues that could not be coded around without work on generic parts of the compiler. I am very happy to say that two of our colleagues, Andrew Burgess and Maxim Blinov (both from embecosm) have joined me in drafting a postable version of the port and we are seeking sponsorship to finish this in the GCC12 timeframe. Maxim has a lightning talk on the GNU tools track at LPC (right after the steering committee session) that will focus on the two generic issues that we’re tackling (1 and 2 below). Here is a short summary of the issues and proposed solutions (detailed discussion of any of the parts below would better be in new threads).

  • Apple Silicon / M1 Port Planned For GCC 12 - Phoronix

    Developers are hoping for next year's GCC 12 release they will have Apple AArch64 support on Darwin in place for being able to support Apple Silicon -- initially the M1 SoC -- on macOS with GCC. LLVM/Clang has long been supporting AArch64 on macOS given that Apple leverages LLVM/Clang as part of their official Xcode toolchain as the basis for their compiler across macOS to iOS and other products. While the GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) supports AArch64 and macOS/Darwin, it hasn't supported the two of them together but there is a port in progress to change it.

  • Dirk Eddelbuettel: tidyCpp 0.0.5 on CRAN: More Protect’ion

    Another small release of the tidyCpp package arrived on CRAN overnight. The packages offers a clean C++ layer (as well as one small C++ helper class) on top of the C API for R which aims to make use of this robust (if awkward) C API a little easier and more consistent. See the vignette for motivating examples. The Protect class now uses the default methods for copy and move constructors and assignment allowing for wide use of the class. The small NumVec class now uses it for its data member.

  • QML Modules in Qt 6.2

    With Qt 6.2 there is, for the first time, a comprehensive build system API that allows you to specify a QML module as a complete, encapsulated unit. This is a significant improvement, but as the concept of QML modules was rather under-developed in Qt 5, even seasoned QML developers might now ask "What exactly is a QML module". In our previous post we have scratched the surface by introducing the CMake API used to define them. We'll take a closer look in this post.

  • Santiago Zarate: So you want to recover and old git branch because it has been overwritten?
  • Start using YAML now | Opensource.com

    YAML (YAML Ain't Markup Language) is a human-readable data serialization language. Its syntax is simple and human-readable. It does not contain quotation marks, opening and closing tags, or braces. It does not contain anything which might make it harder for humans to parse nesting rules. You can scan your YAML document and immediately know what's going on. [...] At this point, you know enough YAML to get started. You can play around with the online YAML parser to test yourself. If you work with YAML daily, then this handy cheatsheet will be helpful.

  • 40 C programming examples

    C programming language is one of the popular programming languages for novice programmers. It is a structured programming language that was mainly developed for UNIX operating system. It supports different types of operating systems, and it is very easy to learn. 40 useful C programming examples have been shown in this tutorial for the users who want to learn C programming from the beginning.

Devices/Embedded: Asus Tinker Board 2 and More

  • Asus Tinker Board 2 single-board computer now available for $94 and up - Liliputing

    The Asus Tinker Board 2 is a Raspberry Pi-shaped single-board computer powered by a Rockchip RK3399 hexa-core processor and featuring 2GB to 4GB of RAM. First announced almost a year ago, the Tinker Board 2 is finally available for $99 and up. Asus also offers a Tinker Board 2S model that’s pretty similar except that it has 16GB of eMMC storage. Prices for that model start at about $120.

  • Raspberry Pi Weekly Issue #371 - Sir Clive Sinclair, 1940 – 2021

    This week ended with the incredibly sad news of the passing of Sir Clive Sinclair. He was one of the founding fathers of home computing and got many of us at Raspberry Pi hooked on programming as kids. Join us in sharing your Sinclair computing memories with us on Twitter and our blog, and we’ll see you next week.

  • cuplTag battery-powered NFC tag logs temperature and humidity (Crowdfunding) - CNX Software

    Temperature and humidity sensors would normally connect to a gateway sending data to the cloud, the coin-cell battery-powered cuplTag NFC tag instead sends data to your smartphone after a tap. CulpTag is controlled by an MSP430 16-bit microcontroller from Texas Instruments which reads and stores sensor data regularly into an EEPROM, and the data can then be read over NFC with the tag returning an URL with the data from the sensor and battery, then display everything on the phone’s web browser (no app needed).

  • A first look at Microchip PolarFire SoC FPGA Icicle RISC-V development board - CNX Software

    Formally launched on Crowd Supply a little over a year ago, Microchip PolarFire SoC FPGA Icicle (codenamed MPFS-ICICLE-KIT-ES) was one of the first Linux & FreeBSD capable RISC-V development boards. The system is equipped with PolarFire SoC FPGA comprised a RISC-V CPU subsystem with four 64-bit RISC-V (RV64GC) application cores, one 64-bit RISC-V real-time core (RV64IMAC), as well as FPGA fabric. Backers of the board have been able to play with it for several months ago, but Microchip is now sending the board to more people for evaluation/review, and I got one of my own to experiment with. That’s good to have a higher-end development board instead of the usual hobbyist-grade board. Today, I’ll just have a look at the kit content and main components on the board before playing with Linux and FPGA development tools in an upcoming or two posts.

  • What is IoT device management?

    Smart devices are everywhere around us. We carry one in our pocket, watch movies on another while a third cooks us dinner. Every day there are thousands of new devices connecting to the Internet. Research shows that by 2025, more than 150,000 IoT devices will come online every minute. With such vast numbers it is impossible to keep everything in working order just on your own. This brings the need for IoT device management. But what is IoT device management? To answer this question we first need to understand what the Internet of Things (IoT) is.

  • Beelink U59 mini PC with Intel Celeron N5095 Jasper Lake coming soon - Liliputing

    Beelink says the system ships with Windows 10, but it should also supports Linux.

  • Beelink U59 Celeron N5095 Jasper Lake mini PC to ship with 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD - CNX Software

    Beelink U59 is an upcoming Jasper Lake mini PC based on the Intel Celeron N5095 15W quad-core processor that will ship with up to 16GB RAM, and 512 GB M.2 SSD storage. The mini PC will also offer two 4K HDMI 2.0 ports, a Gigabit Ethernet port, WiFi 5, as well as four USB 3.0 ports, and support for 2.5-inch SATA drives up to 7mm thick.

Graphics: Mesa, KWinFT, and RADV

  • Experimenting Is Underway For Rust Code Within Mesa - Phoronix

    Longtime Mesa developer Karol Herbst who has worked extensively on the open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver as well as the OpenCL/compute stack while being employed by Red Hat is now toying with the idea of Rust code inside Mesa.  Karol Herbst has begun investigating how Rust code, which is known for its memory safety and concurrency benefits, could be used within Mesa. Ultimately he's evaluating how Rust could be used inside Mesa as an API implementation as well as for leveraging existing Mesa code by Rust. 

  •     
  • KWinFT Continues Working On WLROOTS Render, Library Split

    KWinFT as a fork of KDE's KWin X11/Wayland compositor code continues making progress on driving fundamental display improvements and ironing out the Wayland support.  KWinFT has been transitioning to use WLROOTS for its Wayland heavy-lifting and that process remains ongoing. KWinFT has also been working on splitting up its library code to make it more manageable and robust.  Among the features still desired by KWinFT and to be worked on include input methods, graphical tablet support, and PipeWire video stream integration. Currently there are two full-time developers working on the project but they hope to scale up to four to five full-time developers. 

  • Raytracing Starting to Come Together – Bas Nieuwenhuizen – Open Source GPU Drivers

    I am back with another status update on raytracing in RADV. And the good news is that things are finally starting to come together. After ~9 months of on and off work we’re now having games working with raytracing.

  • Multiple Games Are Now Working With RADV's Ray-Tracing Code - Phoronix

    Not only is Intel progressing with its open-source ray-tracing driver support but the Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" has been rounding out its RT code too and now has multiple games correctly rendering. Bas Nieuwenhuizen has been spearheading the RADV work on Vulkan ray-tracing support and after more than a half-year tackling it things are starting to fall into place nicely.Games such as Quake II RTX with native Vulkan ray-tracing are working along with the game control via VKD3D-Proton for going from Direct3D 12 DXR to Vulkan RT. Metro Exodus is also working while Ghostrunner and Doom Eternal are two games tested that are not yet working.

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