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Android vs. iPhone: Pros and Cons

Filed under
Android
Mac

Despite its painful shortcomings, Android treats me like an adult. It doesn't lock me into only two methods for backing up my data. Yes, some of Android's limitations are due to the fact that it's focused on letting me choose how to handle my data. But, I also get to choose my own device, add storage on a whim. Android enables me to do a lot of cool stuff that the iPhone simply isn't capable of doing.

At its core, Android gives non-root users greater access to the phone's functionality. For better or worse, it's a level of freedom that I think people are gravitating towards. Now there are going to be many of you who swear by the iPhone thanks to efforts like the libimobiledevice project. But take a long hard look at all the stuff Apple blocks Linux users from doing...then ask yourself – is it really worth it as a Linux user? Hit the Comments, share your thoughts on Android, iPhone or Ubuntu.

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iPhone vs Android: Almost Half Of iPhone Users Think Android Phones Are More Advanced

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Android
Mac

Forty-five percent of iPhone users say they believe Android phones are "more advanced" than iPhones, a survey of smartphone owners released Wednesday indicated. Thirty-one percent disagreed while the rest were unsure.

The survey was conducted by OnePulse, a London startup, which surveyed 1,500 iPhone and Android users via its app. Overall, including iPhone and Android users, 40 percent of those surveyed said Android was more advanced than iPhone.

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​Why switch to Windows 10 or a Mac when you can use Linux Mint 17.3 instead?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft
Mac

Yes, I'm serious. I use all the above desktops -- yes I'm a Windows 7 and 10 user as well as a Linux guy -- and for people I think Mint 17.3 makes a great desktop.

I've been using Mint as my main Linux desktop for years now. Unlike some desktops I could name -- cough, Windows 8, cough -- Linux Mint has never had a flop. Every year that goes by, this operating system keeps getting better. The other desktops? Not so much.

Let's take a closer look.at Windows 7 vs. Linux Mint 17.3

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Satire and Prose: Apple and Microsoft

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
  • [Satire] Jono Bacon urges users to ditch Linux and move to Mac OS X
  • Jono Bacon introduces Bad Voltage spin-off Mac Voltage at SCaLE 14x
  • Redmond Admits Using Microsoft Supported Windows Is ‘Risky’ [Ed: back doors as standard]

    In previous visits to Claude and Jane’s house I had cautioned both of them that if the messages they got for any reason seemed to be pushy or if those messages are telling you that you are in danger of infection, that is more than likely malware designed to get you to click a link. Evidently, Jane had listened. Since the “Upgrade to Windows 10” was a clickable link, she stopped what she was doing and signed out of Windows and booted back into Linux. From those friendly confines she began to do a bit of research as to what malware might be threatening her.

    Turns out, she discovered that malware was Windows 10.

    She called me to see if I was busy and would I come over and take a look at this for her. She wanted to make sure she was going to be safe in Windows — or as safe as anyone can be in Windows anyway.

    Jane had taken it on herself to see what this was all about and in that look around the internet she found what she suspected to be true. Microsoft Windows it seems, is in the business of trying to scare old ladies or anyone else who doesn’t really feel comfortable in a technology environment. When I was able to get over there, she showed me what she had found.

Was ​Apple the first major open-source company? Not even close

Filed under
Mac
OSS

Ah, I don't think so.

Many older open-source programmers think, with reason, that's nonsense.

True, Apple has used open-source software for years, but that's not the same thing as making open-source development "a key part of its strategy." It would be more correct to say that Apple was the first major company to take advantage of open source.

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Also on this topic:

  • Is Open Source Swift a good thing ? [Ed (Roy): Apple and Microsoft 'contribute' to Open Source like animal farms (for meat) contribute to bovine and fowl]

    On December 3 Apple has open sourced the Swift programming language on Swift.org. The language was first released (not Open Source yet) about the same time as iOS 8 and was created by Apple to make Mac and iOS app development an easier task. Swift is welcome as one more Open Source language and project but is too early to make a lot of noise about it.

    [...]

    For now Swift has no client-side (as Angular for JavaScript) or server-side (as Rail for Ruby, Django for Python) application frameworks. Exceptions are the proprietary Cocoa and Cocoa Touch frameworks for Apple platforms only.

    For now Swift can only offer a very young set of core libraries.

    We have enough modern Open Source languages: Python, Ruby, Perl, JavaScript, PHP, Java just to mention the most recent ones. A lot of energy is required to create an ecosystem around a language.

    It is difficult to unbound Swift from Apple platforms since a lot of Open Source extensions for Swift still use proprietary Apple class libraries as NSString etc.

  • Apple retracts comment that it was first major open source company after criticism

    Last week Apple’s open sourcing of Swift naturally saw the spotlight thrown over Apple’s open source pages. This included a paragraph that claimed Apple was “the first major computer company to make Open Source a key part of its strategy”. Unsurprisingly, this riled some members of the developer community as being disingenuous and untrue.

  • Apple is proud of its open source software Swift. A bit too proud

    But it may be a bit too proud. On its page celebrating open-source software, Apple originally claimed it was “the first major computer company to make Open Source development a key part of its ongoing software strategy”.

    That claim will have come as some surprise to most major computer companies. While Apple has a long history of adopting open-source code for its own releases, most notably with the Unix basis of Mac OS X in 1999, it isn’t exactly the first mover in the field. And as for releasing its own proprietary code as open source, that’s something that it has been even slower on – certainly compared to arch rival Google, whose Android operating system is and always has been freely licensed.

Openwashing

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac

Swift and GNU/Linux

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux
Mac

Mozilla Mobile

Filed under
Linux
Mac
Moz/FF

Android 6 Vs. iOS 9: The Showdown

Filed under
Android
Mac

It wasn’t too long ago that we put the major mobile operating systems head to head, but with big updates from both Google and Apple in the meantime, we think it’s worth another look at where they both stand. Is there a clear winner? Or are they barely distinguishable any more?

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OpenSUSE 42.2 Alpha

Android/Chromebook

  • No more Android Wear watches says Samsung, Tizen all the way !
    Samsung has been getting pretty serious about its Smartwatches and has certainly excelled with its latest creation, the Tizen based Gear S2. The company has had a little dabble with Android wear in the past, with the Galaxy Gear Live, and since has been focusing on Tizen. According to a report from Fast Company stating that “no more Samsung Android Wear devices are in development or being planned.” This is according to a Samsung executive. The report goes further to say that Samsung executives are going with Tizen because it’s “far more battery-efficient than Android Wear” and “the standard OS on other Samsung products from TVs to refrigerators.”
  • Are games too easy to pirate on Android?
    It's long been known that game developers make much more money on iOS than they do on Google's Android platform. The most recent example of this is Monument Valley. The developers of the game posted an article on Medium with infographics that show that 73% of their revenue comes from iOS, while only 17% comes from Android.
  • Google Trust API Will Replace Your Passwords With A ‘Trust Score’
    In the wake of increasing security threats and password leaks, Google is working on Project Abacus that will introduce Trust API in Android devices. This API will calculate your Trust Score and use them to give you access to various services. This score will be calculated by using a variety of user patterns.
  • Monument Valley in Numbers: Year 2
  • And the winners of the Google Play Awards are…
  • Why are Chromebooks outselling Macs?
  • Fancy ChromiumOS, Ubuntu, And Android TV All-In-One System
    If you are looking for a mini PC that is capable of running ChromiumOS, Ubuntu LTS, and Android TV operating systems, you may be interested in a new mini desktop computer system that has been created by Dylan Callahan. The Fancy mini PC is a “handcrafted personal computer” that is now available to purchase price to $225 plus shipping and is powered by a Quad Core x86 2.0 Ghz processor supported by 4K AMD Radeon graphics that is supported by 4GB of DDR3 RAM.

Leftovers: OSS

  • Linksys Sees Value Open Source Market for WRT Wireless Routers
    The wireless router world remains safe for open source -- at least for users of certain Linksys Wi-Fi devices, which will still allow the installation of open source firmware like DD-WRT after new FCC rules take effect next week. Here's the back story: Last fall, the Federal Communications Commissions (FCC) introduced new regulations that required device manufacturers to ensure "that third parties are not able to reprogram the device to operate outside the parameters for which the device was certified." Those rules go into effect June 2.
  • Keynote: How Enterprises are Leveraging Open Source Analytics Platforms
    In this Keynote, Luciano Resende, Architect, Spark Technology Center at IBM, will showcase Open source Analytic platforms. Luciano will also discuss how they are being leveraged by different organizations to upend their competition, as well as enable new use cases.
  • Verizon’s Open Source Network Points Way For Enterprises
  • An open source toolbox for pure mathematics
    The field of pure mathematics has always depended on computers to make tables, prove theorems and explore new theories. Today, computer aided experiments and the use of databases relying on computer calculations are part of the pure mathematician's standard toolbox. In fact, these tools have become so important that some areas of mathematics are now completely dependent on them.
  • Asa Dotzler: My New Role @ Mozilla
    After a couple of years working on Mozilla’s mobile operating system project, I’m coming back to Firefox! I’ll be doing some familiar things and some new things. My official title is Product Manager, Firefox Roadmap and Community. What that means, first and foremost, is that I’ll be returning as our storyteller, making sure that we’re communicating regularly about where Firefox is heading, and that we’re fully engaged with Firefox users, fans, and contributors.

Big Data and Databases