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macOS to FreeBSD migration a.k.a why I left macOS

Filed under
Mac
BSD

This is not a technical documentation for how I migrated from macOS to FreeBSD. This is a high-level for why I migrated from macOS to FreeBSD.

Not so long ago, I was using macOS as my daily driver. The main reason why I got a macbook was the underlying BSD Unix and the nice graphics it provides. Also, I have an iPhone. But they were also the same reasons for why I left macOS.

I did not want to write this post right after the migration, I wanted to take my time, use FreeBSD daily, see if I will ever miss macOS.

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Jussi Pakkanen: How Apple might completely take over end users' computers

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Mac

Many people are concerned about Apple's ongoing attempts to take more and more control of end user machines from their users. Some go so far as to say that Apple won't be happy until they have absolute and total control over all programs running on end user devices, presumably so that they can enforce their 30% tax on every piece of software. Whether this is true or not we don't really know.

What we can do instead is a thought experiment. If that was their end goal, how would they achieve it? What steps would they take to obtain this absolute control? Let's speculate.

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User-hostile Hardware

Filed under
Hardware
Microsoft
Mac
  • Linus Torvalds wants Apple’s new M1-powered Macs to run Linux

    Earlier this month, Apple revealed its own ARM-based M1 processor, along with new MacBooks and a desktop Mac Mini powered by this chip. Reviewers across the globe have been praising Apple‘s first attempt, giving it high marks for performance and battery life.

    All this positive coverage has tempted many to take the plunge and buy one of the new machines — even if some apps are not running natively at the moment. Even Linus Torvalds, the principal developer of the Linux kernel, wants one.

    [...]

    Linux support on MacBooks would’ve made it a more attractive bet for programmers. However, I don’t think any engineers at the Cupertino campus plan to make that happen anytime soon. Sorry, Linus.

  • New Microsoft chip will come with added costs, says ex-NSA hacker

    Microsoft's new security chip, announced last week, will have an impact on hardware-only attacks, an American security professional says, adding that it could also assist in firmware security, but would result in added costs.

Proprietary Software and Security Issues

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Microsoft
Mac
Security

Linux vs. macOS: 15 Key Differences You Need to Know

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac

The tug of war between Linux and macOS continues to go through the test of time. The internet meme world concludes their major differences in the usual humorous manner. In their opinion, macOS is for the rich, and Linux is for the skilled. If we add the Windows operating system to this debate, then patience as an attribute would also be a highlight of discussion. However, no operating system is perfect, but there is a perfect being for each operating system.

The individual superiority in both Linux and macOS comes at a cost. This article is here to shed some light on the matter and, at the same time, remove the skeletons hiding in the two OS’s closets.

Linux vs. macOS

Since we are here to neither shame Linux nor macOS, we will look at the preference each operating system brings to the table when comparatively analyzed. However, the preferences might favor one operating system over the other. The final verdict will be in regards to performance flexibility and stability. It’s time to roll the dice on the first comparative topic.

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Security and Proprietary Software Leftovers

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac
Security

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (chromium, firefox, gdm, linux-hardened, matrix-synapse, salt, sddm, and wordpress), Debian (firefox-esr, libmaxminddb, and moin), Fedora (cifs-utils, firefox, galera, java-latest-openjdk, mariadb, mariadb-connector-c, and wordpress), Gentoo (blueman, chromium, firefox, mariadb, qemu, salt, tmux, and wireshark), openSUSE (sddm), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (kernel-alt, microcode_ctl, and rh-nodejs12-nodejs), SUSE (kernel, microcode_ctl, openldap2, python-waitress, spice-vdagent, u-boot, and ucode-intel), and Ubuntu (firefox, intel-microcode, linux, linux-aws, linux-azure, linux-gcp, linux-kvm, linux-oracle, linux-raspi, linux, linux-gcp, linux-gcp-4.15, linux-gcp-5.4, linux-gke-4.15, linux-gke-5.3, linux-hwe, linux-hwe-5.4, linux-oem, linux-oem-osp1, linux-oracle, linux-oracle-5.4, and moin).

  • Less than 6 months to 16.04 ESM: 6 things to prepare | Ubuntu

    Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Xenial Xerus will enter the extended security maintenance (ESM) period in April 2021. This article explains the ESM period and provides a guide for six key considerations when planning a migration path from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.

    [...]

    2) Consider the full stack. The OS is a heart of the system, and an OS migration is a significant change that touches multiple aspects of your configuration, from the Linux kernel up to your applications. Remember to evaluate how the migration will impact your existing workloads and APIs as your current configuration might depend on specific versions of the applications and libraries that shipped with Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. You will likely find newer versions of applications and libraries if you choose a more recent version of Ubuntu (you can find a few examples below). Those versions might not be fully compatible with your overall configuration anymore after the migration.

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  • Waves of attacks on US hospitals show a change in tactics for cybercriminals [iophk: Windows TCO]

                     

                       

    United States hospitals were targeted by two major cybersecurity attacks this fall: the first taking down Universal Health Services, a chain of hundreds of hospitals, and the second by a group called UNC1878 threatening hundreds of individual health care facilities all around the country. Targeting health care institutions directly marks a new approach for cybercriminals.

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  • Ransomware Hits Dozens of Hospitals in an Unprecedented Wave [iophk: Windows TCO]

                     

                       

    On Wednesday evening, the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, Federal Bureau of Investigation, and Department of Health and Human Services warned that there is a "an increased and imminent cybercrime threat to US hospitals and health care providers," above and beyond the wave of attacks that have already occurred. The alert points to the notorious Trickbot trojan and Ryuk ransomware as the primary hacking tools involved in the attacks. Security analysts at private companies say that the activity is tied to the Russian criminal gang sometimes called UNC 1878 or Wizard Spider.

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  • Ransomware Group Turns to Facebook Ads

                     

                       

    It’s not clear whether this was an isolated incident, or whether the fraudsters also ran ads using other [cracked] Facebook accounts. A spokesperson for Facebook said the company is still investigating the incident. A request for comment sent via email to Campari’s media relations team was returned as undeliverable.

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  • On Apple's Piss-Poor Documentation

                     

                       

    However, as users rightly demand more complicated and fancy apps, the APIs often need to get more fancy and complicated as well. Suddenly you look up and, instead of only using screwdrivers and hammers, you’re using power tools and complicated saws, and everything is much more fiddly than it once was.

                       

    With real tools, you’d expect to receive an owner’s manual, which explains how to use the tool you’ve just purchased. A rough analogy exists for APIs, insofar as most platform vendors will provide documentation. This is basically the "owner’s manual" for that API.

                       

    Apple’s documentation has, for years, been pretty bad. Over the last couple years, it has gone from bad → awful → despicable → embarrassing. All too often, I go to research how to do something new, and use an API I’m not familiar with, only to be stymied by those three dreaded words:

    No overview available.

Apple backtracks on App Store removal threat for Unix shell iOS apps

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Mac

Developers of Linux and Unix shells have received warnings from Apple that their iOS apps violate App Store Review Guidelines, with the threat of termination from the App Store said to be reversed in at least one instance.

A shell is a tool that enables users to perform command-line operations on a device, which usually doesn't offer that sort of functionality, such as the lack of a terminal in iOS. These terminal emulator apps like a-Shell and iSH enable the use of many Unix commands in iOS, which can be useful for developers and power users.

However, according to a series of tweets on Sunday, it seems that the two apps have come under fire from Apple's App Store team for seemingly violating the App Store Review Guidelines. The iSH Twitter account advised it was informed by Apple it would be removing the app from the App Store on Monday.

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Proprietary Software and DRM/Monopoly

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac

  • FOSS Patents: Fortnite users continue to make in-app purchases on iOS that bypass Apple's payment system: court filing says "Epic is stealing money from Apple"

    In yesterday's filing, Apple says it has the right to sue Epic not only for breach of contract but also for tort, given that Epic would face tort liability "if [t]c had never executed the contracts with Apple and had instead found another way to smuggle Fortnite and its 'hotfix' payment mechanism into the App Store." Apple argues that a company protecting itself against such behavior through contracts must not be in a weaker legal position than one that doesn't. What Apple does clarify is that it won't seek "multiplicative recovery" if the same conduct on Epic's part constituted both a breach of an agreement and fraud. In other words, Apple would then content itself with only the greater of the two alternative amounts.

    It appears that the "hotfix" was just a simple data point on Epic's servers--not program code, but merely a trigger. When the iOS version of Fortnite checked on that data point, it offered an alternative payment mechanism to end users in circumvention of Apple's in-app payment rules.

    After the "hotfix" that Apple says became Epic's hot mess, Fortnite was removed from the App Store. That means it cannot be downloaded to iOS devices right now, and Epic has already failed twice (with a motion for a temporary restraining order as well as a motion for a preliminary injunction) to get a court to force Apple to tolerate an iOS version of Fortnite that bypasses Apple's in-app payment system.

  • Why Apple’s App Store Is Under Siege

    Fueling the fire was a report issued last week by House Democrats summing up an antitrust probe into four Big Tech companies — Apple, Amazon, Facebook and Google — and urging Congress to enact new laws to curb the companies’ power. The 449-page report called on Congress to enact new laws to curb the companies’ power, including prohibiting companies like Apple from operating “adjacent lines of business” (in other words, preventing it from offering its own apps in the App Store that compete with those from third parties).

    “Apple’s monopoly power over app distribution on iPhones permits the App Store to generate supra-normal profits,” the House Judiciary Committee report said.

  • Microsoft Says Long-Time Deals Executive Brown Leaving Company

    Microsoft Corp. said mergers and acquisitions chief Marc Brown is leaving the company after a more than two-decade stint working on deals ranging from LinkedIn to Nokia Oyj’s handset unit.

    Brown, vice president of corporate development, reported to Chief Financial Officer Amy Hood. Microsoft spokesman Frank Shaw on Friday confirmed Brown’s departure and declined to comment on a replacement. The company is still conducting a search for a senior business development executive to replace Peggy Johnson, who left in July to become chief executive officer at Magic Leap Inc.

  • Your brand new Oculus Quest 2 can’t play Oculus Go games, John Carmack confirms [Ed: Digital Restrictions (DRM) in action]

    If you bought a new Oculus Quest 2 with the hopes of experiencing games from the now-discontinued Oculus Go, I have bad news: the company has decided not to include support for Go titles on the Quest 2, Oculus’ consulting CTO John Carmack confirms on Twitter.

    When the Oculus Quest 2 launched three days ago, some people noticed there was no feature on the UI that allowed users to access Go apps and games, something the original Quest headset featured. Carmack did not go into much detail on why support was not added other than “[he] totally lost the internal debate over backwards compatibility.”

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  • Three npm packages found opening shells on Linux, Windows systems [Ed: The writers at ZDNet are apt at blaming “LINUX” for security threats that have nothing to do with Linux. Now that Microsoft is serving malware ZDNet… blames “NPM” (ssshhhhh… don’t mention Microsoft)]
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Digital Restrictions (DRM) and Proprietary Pushers

Filed under
Microsoft
Mac

     
  • Facebook is accidentally locking some users out of their new Oculus headsets

                     

                       

    As UploadVR reported yesterday, users complained that they had been suspended for unclear reasons while they were trying to set up the Quest 2. One poster on the Oculus subreddit, for instance, described getting banned after creating a Facebook page for the first time and merging it with an existing Oculus account. “I logged into Facebook’s website to lock down my profile, as I had no intention of using the social media site more than was needed, and within minutes of merging accounts and changing profile settings my account was banned without any reason given or cause I can think of,” the user told The Verge in an email — rendering the Quest 2 a “new white paperweight.” Other people in the subreddit chimed in with their own experiences getting locked out.

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  • Games Piracy Scene Reinvigorated, Four Denuvo-Protected Titles Released in One Day

           

             

    Late August the piracy Scene was thrown into turmoil when law enforcement raids took place all around Europe. With few hopes of a significant recovery any time soon, in the space of a few minutes yesterday veteran cracking group CPY released four games previously protected by Denuvo. For many pirates, this is the positive signal they'd been waiting for.

  • Microsoft ends support for Office 2010, bangs the Office 365 gong
  • Microsoft is foisting Office web apps on Edge users

    Microsoft is no stranger to using Windows and other software to promote more of its own apps and services. The latest way the company is doing this is via Edge.

    Accusations of using its products as an advertising tool or as a means of forcing products onto users are nothing new for the Windows maker, and the company's latest move with Edge does nothing to shake them off. The browser has been found to install Microsoft Office web apps without asking for permission.

  • JACK2 Audio Server Rolls Out Better Windows + macOS Support - Phoronix

    JACK2 1.9.15 released on Thursday as the newest version of this professional-minded sound server focused on real-time, low-latency connections.

    JACK2 1.9.15 brings a number of bug fixes, improvements to various JACK tools, deprecates JACK-Session, and makes other improvements. JACK1 continues to be in a bug-fix mode while JACK2 continues advancing slowly and incorporating all of its functionality.

  • Has Apple abandoned CUPS, the Linux's world's widely used open-source printing system? Seems so

    After only one public Git commit this year, penguinstas think: Fork it, we don't need Cupertino. The official public repository for CUPS, an Apple open-source project widely used for printing on Linux, is all-but dormant since the lead developer left Apple at the end of 2019.

WhiteSur: macOS Big Sur Like Gtk, Gnome Shell And Icon Themes For Your Linux Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Mac
GNOME

WhiteSur Gtk Theme is a macOS Big Sur like theme for Gnome-based desktops, supporting Gnome Shell, Cinnamon, Xfce, Pantheon, Budgie and Mate desktops.

The theme pack comes in both light and dark variants, both having regular (with the sidebar slightly transparent in some applications) and solid versions.

There's also an optional Plank dock theme for those that want to achieve an even closer look to macOS Big Sur. As a side note, if you use Ubuntu and want to disable Ubuntu Dock so you can use Plank dock instead, see this article.
The theme requires Gtk 3.20 or newer, so it should work with most Linux distributions, e.g. from Ubuntu 18.04 to 20.10, etc.

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More in Tux Machines

X Still Improving and Microsoft 'Embraces' and 'Extends' Mesa, More DRM

  • X.Org Server 1.20.10 Allows For Larger Number Of Input Devices, Present Extension Fixes - Phoronix

    Following Tuesday's disclosure of more X.Org Server security bugs, X.Org Server 1.20.10 was released that provides those input fixes plus a number of other patches that have been back-ported and accumulated in the 1.20 series.

  • Microsoft Begins Landing Changes For Cross-Platform Support With Their Mesa D3D12 Code [Ed: Microsoft is interfering in Mesa development to make it more Windows- and Microsoft-leaning. See the comments: “Did they also include an option to uninstall the windows subsystem?” [...] “Is this worth celebrating? It means nothing for desktop Linux at all." […] "MS is firmly in the “Extend” phase of their conquest…”]

    Last month the Microsoft-backed Direct3D 12 Gallium3D driver was merged into Mesa 21.0. This is the driver for allowing graphics/compute APIs like OpenGL and OpenCL to run on top of Direct3D with Windows 10. That work to the Gallium D3D12 code has been continuing with the start of the cross-platform code now being merged.

  • Syscall User Dispatch Appears Destined For Linux 5.11 To Help Windows Games On Linux

    The Syscall User Dispatch support looks like it should be mainlined for the Linux 5.11 kernel. This functionality is important for modern Windows games running on Linux under Wine / Proton. Syscall User Dispatch has been in the works for a while as a kernel-level improvement for dealing with Windows games/apps that use system call instructions, bypassing the Windows API. Games avoiding the Windows API and performing system calls directly is an increasingly common occurrence by modern Windows games, seemingly in the name of Digital Rights Management schemes and similar protected modes. This though has been a problem for Wine (and Steam Play's Proton) when bypassing the conventional Windows APIs.

Sleek: A simple To-do app that makes use of todo.txt file format

Todo.txt is a small yet a useful way to organize to-dos in one readable text file. It's popular among developers, software engineers, DevOps and nerdy Linux/ Unix users. Read more

Outreachy Stuff

  • GNU Guix: Welcome our intern for the Outreachy 2020-2021 round

    We are thrilled to announce that Magali L. Sacramento (IRC: lemes) will join Guix as an Outreachy intern over the next few month. [...] Magali will work on adding a subcommand to Guix showing the history of all packages. This will facilitate the use of guix time-machine and inferiors, as it will add support to easily search for a given package version on all the defined channels. Simon Tournier will be the primary mentor, with Gábor Boskovits co-mentoring, and the whole community will undoubtedly help and provide guidance, as it has always done.

  • Outreachy Kicks Off Winter 2020 Round With Several Interesting Open-Source Projects - Phoronix

    Outreachy interns have been announced for the winter 2020 round. Selected participants are working on various open-source tasks from December through March in exchange for a $5,500 USD stipend to become involved with open-source.

today's howtos

  • How to Create Abstract Desktop Backgrounds with Trianglify Wallpaper - Make Tech Easier

    Many people prefer using abstract desktop backgrounds as their desktop wallpaper since they allow you to stay focused on what matters: the foreground apps. It’s boring staying with the same wallpaper for months, but it also feels like wasting your time hunting down new abstract wallpaper. Why not try out Trianglify Wallpaper, an easy-to-use app that can make your desktop more exciting and somewhat dynamic? With Trianglify Wallpaper, you can manually create abstract desktop backgrounds based on triangular shapes and add color to your desktop. You can also set it on auto and let it loose to create and place new wallpaper on your desktop automatically. Let’s see how.

  • RHCE Ansible Series #10: RHEL System Roles
  • Linux Command Basics: 7 commands for process management | Enable Sysadmin

    If you're new to Linux and need help managing your processes, these basic commands are for you.

  • Upgrade Fedora 33 from Fedora 32 using DNF – If Not True Then False

    This is guide, howto upgrade Fedora 32 to Fedora 33 using DNF. This method works on desktop and server machines. You can also upgrade older Fedora installations (example Fedora 31/30/29) directly to Fedora 33. I have tested this method on several machines, but if you have problems, please let me know. Always remember backup, before upgrade!

  • How do i install MongoDB on CentOS / RHEL - LinuxTechLab

    It has been created keeping the current database requirement in mind for modern applications & the cloud era. MongoDB is very fast & has great performance when compared to the SQL database. MongoDB databases are very easy to scale & they also address various shortcomings that other SQL databases present.

  • Quickly Navigate Through Directory History In Fish Shell - OSTechNix

    Do you often work with large number of directories? I have a small tip for you. This brief guide explains how to quickly navigate through directory history using cdh, nextd and prevd commands in Fish shell in Linux. [...] A while ago, we discussed about pushd, popd and dirs commands which allows us to quickly navigate through a stack of directories. Unlike the normal cd command, the pushd, popd and dirs commands helps you to easily move back and forth between directories, without having to type the full path. These trio commands comes in handy when you are working with large number of directories and sub-directories. Today, we will learn three other similar commands namely cdh, nextd and prevd. As the name says, the cdh command allows you to change to the recently visited directories, the nextd command allows you to move forward through directory and the prevd command allows you to move backward through directory history. This set of three commands are available only in Fish shell and they are often used to navigate through the recently visited directories easily as well as quickly. The cdh, nextd and prevd commands are quite useful if you are often dealing with deep directory structure. You can quickly go forward or backward without having to the type the actual path of the directories. These triplet makes your CLI navigation better and faster!

  • How to Install and Setup Let’s Encrypt (Certbot) on Linux

    Getting an HTTPS certificate for your website is not anymore an optional choice. If you are a website developer, you might know that Google has already declared that those who have an SSL certificate into their website will get privileges to rank their website in the google search engine rank. Moreover, getting an SSL certificate makes your website secure, invulnerable, and trustworthy to the visitors. Now, there are many certification authorities to give your website an SSL certificate; the confusion is, which one should you use? While speaking of the SSL certificate, Let’s Encrypt is the most popular and free certification authority to grant your website an SSL certificate and make it secure. You can install and run the Let’s Encrypt on Linux and any other platforms.

  • How To Install Node Version Manager Tool - NVM on Linux System

    NVM is a cross-platform node version manager that can maintain a different version of nodes on your Linux system. Now, if you are familiar with working with Node.js, you might already know that there are plenty of versions of Node.js are available. NVM works with the help of the source-code of NodeJS and the Chrome V8 engine. The engineers of Google build the chrome V8 engine, and they made a collaboration with the NVM to offer the users a smooth and reliable user interface. You can install this tool on your Linux distribution to reduce the memory issue, to upgrade the Node.js file automatically on your system.

  • Free up Disk Space – Clear Systemd Journal Logs in Ubuntu 20.04 | UbuntuHandbook

    Going to free up Ubuntu system disk space? Try clearing the systemd journal logs, it may free up a few GB of space. By using the Disk Usage Analyzer tool, I found that /var/log/journal takes more than 4 GB system space in my Ubuntu 20.04.

  • Set up OpenStack on a Raspberry Pi cluster | Opensource.com

    In the year since the Raspberry Pi 4 was released, I've seen many tutorials (like this and this) and articles on how well the 4GB model works with container platforms such as Kubernetes (K8s), Lightweight Kubernetes (K3s), and Docker Swarm. As I was doing research, I read that Arm processors are "first-class citizens" in OpenStack. Since Raspberry Pi is built on Arm, I decided to test this theory by installing OpenStack on a Raspberry Pi cluster.

  • Vagrant beyond the basics - Fedora Magazine

    There are, like most things in the Unix/Linux world, many ways of doing things with Vagrant, but here are some examples of ways to grow your Vagrantfile portfolio and increase your knowledge and use. If you have not yet installed vagrant you can follow the first part of this series.

  • Verifying Linux Server Security: What Every Admin Needs to Know

    Linux is a widespread OS known for its robust security. That being said, vulnerabilities are inevitable in any OS, and Linux system administrators must be vigilant about monitoring and verifying the security of their servers on an ongoing basis in order to protect sensitive data and prevent attacks. After all, the majority of attacks on Linux systems can be attributed to poor administration.

  • Swap mouse buttons via key shortcut in Gnome - Lukáš Zapletal

    Gnome provides an easy way to swap mouse buttons which is a useful feature for left-handed people. I am right-handed, however I am trying to swap mouse in my hands to compensate and prevent injury. Swapping buttons via Mouse and Touchpad settings is slow and clunky. You will find many tutorials on how to swap buttons from the command line but these are XOrg or xinput remappings. I wanted to do it consistently so Gnome is not confused and also the Mouse and Touchpad dialog or other applications work properly.

  • Parsing sudo JSON logs: building a syslog-ng configuration - Blog - syslog-ng Community - syslog-ng Community

    The latest version of sudo, version 1.9.4 includes support for JSON formatted logging. Compared to traditional sudo logs, it has the advantage of containing more information in a structured way. While traditional sudo logs are also parsed automatically by syslog-ng, it is worth taking a look at the new JSON formatted logs. From this blog, you can learn how the new logs look like and also a configuration working with these logs. Instead of just posting a complex configuration, I try to show you how my configuration was built. Creating a new configuration in smaller iterations makes the resulting configurations easier to debug.

  • The 50 Most Useful Zypper Commands for SUSE Linux Users

    If you are a veteran Linux user like me, chances are you have come across the term SUSE Linux. It is one of the most powerful, enterprise-ready Linux distribution and is used by a plethora of companies worldwide. In fact, SUSE was the first Linux distribution marketed for businesses. SUSE has two variants – a free, open-source version called openSUSE and a commercial solution named SUSE Linux Enterprise. The zypper command-line utility is the de-facto package management solution for both of these variants. In this guide, we will provide some practical instructions on how to use this tool.