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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Kiwi TCMS: Project mission and goals for 2019

    Hello testers, Kiwi TCMS has taken on a brave new mission! We would like to transform the testing process by making it more organized, transparent & accountable for everyone on your team. Our goal is to improve engineering productivity and participation in testing. The following blog post outlines how we would like to achieve this and what goals we put before ourselves for this year.

  • Lightworks Video Editor Plans For A Busy 2019 But No Signs Of The Open-Source Version

    EditShare, which continues developing the professional-grade Lightworks video editor, does continue maintaining their Linux support and this year they are planning for more improvements. But not shared as part of their 2019 plans is any word on making good about the "open-source" version of the software they originally announced back in 2010. 

  • How to download & install Cloudready Chromium OS on VirtualMachine
  • Gentoo News: FOSDEM 2019

    It’s FOSDEM time again! Join us at Université libre de Bruxelles, Campus du Solbosch, in Brussels, Belgium. This year’s FOSDEM 2019 will be held on February 2nd and 3rd.

  • Markus Koschany: My Free Software Activities in December 2018

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

  • Google Chrome’s Ad Blocker Ready For A Global Launch Starting July 9th

    The in-house Google Chrome ad-blocker, which was initially launched for United States, Canada, and Europe last year, is ready to roll out worldwide on July 9th, Google said in a blog post.

    Google has been following the Better Ads Standards from the Coalition for Better ads for more than a year. This group’s sole purpose is to improve the user experience while surfing the web.

  • AWS gives open source the middle finger

    AWS launched DocumentDB today, a new database offering that is compatible with the MongoDB API. The company describes DocumentDB as a “fast, scalable, and highly available document database that is designed to be compatible with your existing MongoDB  applications and tools.” In effect, it’s a hosted drop-in replacement for MongoDB that doesn’t use any MongoDB code.

    AWS argues that while MongoDB is great at what it does, its customers have found it hard to build fast and highly available applications on the open-source platform that can scale to multiple terabytes and hundreds of thousands of reads and writes per second. So what the company did was build its own document database, but made it compatible with the Apache 2.0 open source MongoDB 3.6 API.

  • Red Hat’s David Egts Pushes Open Source Software for Cost-Efficient Gov’t IT Training

    David Egts, chief technologist for the North American public sector business at Red Hat (NYSE: RHT), has identified open source training as an approach that the federal government can take to advance the cybersecurity and information technology skills of its workforce, ExecutiveBiz reported Thursday.

    “[The] open source community has put effective training on a number of topics, including cloud migration and deployment and cybersecurity, well within the reach of every agency and IT administrator,” Egts wrote in a Nextgov guest piece published Wednesday.

  • Quartz AI Studio launches an open-source platform to help journalists use machine learning

    Imagine you had a personal assistant that you can task with sorting out a pile of messy documents, or ploughing through a mountain of spreadsheets to find what you are looking for.

    Enter the Quartz AI Studio, a US-based project that helps journalists use machine learning to write better stories.

    The initiative, launched in November 2018 with the support of Knight Foundation, is spearheaded by John Keefe, Quartz’s technical architect for bots and machine learning, who previously led the Quartz Bot Studio.

  • Open-source microscope targets brain imaging and disease diagnosis

    A team of researchers at Tel Aviv University in Israel has developed a new multiphoton microscopy tool, known as Pysight, for rapid 2D and 3D imaging of the brain and other tissues.

    Among other things, the team hopes that the tool could soon boost scientists' efforts to attain a deeper understand of brain dynamics, assisting in the discovery of groundbreaking treatments for a range of health problems including stroke, epilepsy and dementia.

    Pablo Blinder, who heads up the team at the Neurobiology, Biochemistry and Biophysics School and Sagol School for Neuroscience at Tel Aviv University, explains that PySight combines commercially available, off-the-shelf hardware with open-source software tailored for photon-depleted imaging conditions, such as those characteristic of rapid multiphoton microscopy.

    “[PySight’s] commercial hardware converts the noisy output of each photodetector into uniform photon detection events, and registers their absolute arrival time with a temporal precision of 100 picoseconds,” he says.

    “Its software package then reads the resulting list of photon arrival times, determines the respective origin within the brain of each detected photon, and generates volumetric movies over time.”

    In a recent paper published in the journal Optica, Blinder and his co-authors demonstrate the benefits of using PySight for tracking neuronal activity in awake mice and fruit flies. While initially developed with neuroimaging purposes in mind, Blinder reveals that the tool could just as easily be used for a range of other imaging applications - including detection of malignant cells in human patients during surgical procedures.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Episode 49 | This Week in Linux

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, there’s a brand new release of the Linux Kernel with 4.20. The EU is offering Bug Bounties for Open Source software and MIPS has announced it’s going to become Open Source. We’ll have a follow up to the Necuno Mobile topic from Episode 45 and then we’ll take a look at some Distro News for Septor Linux, OviOS and One Laptop Per Child. Then we’ll cover some App News from Syncthing, Mixxx, Darktable, RawTherapee, KStars, and much more. Later in the show, we’ll talk about some Linux Gaming news. All that and much more!

  • Gergely Nagy: One hat less

    At the time, I was... a different person. I was full of myself at times, I was angry, perhaps a tad too elitist at times too. I'm not proud of old me, but it's part of me. I grew, and became a better person, there's no shame in being able to grow - quite the contrary. And Debian helped immensely. I've had role models in the project, who I look up to even to this day, who helped shape me one way or the other.

    There are two people I need to mention specifically: Martin Michlmayr and Rhonda D'Vine.

    Martin was my Application Manager when I applied, I considered him a mentor, a friend. The example he set were instrumental in shaping me too. Rhonda helped me get to my first ever conference: I got on a train to Vienna, and she took me to LinuxTag in her car from there, and then back again. That first LinuxTag, the path that led there, the conference itself, was formative, and both Martin and Rhonda had a big part in it being so. Thank you again - so many years later, I still smile when I think back. Those years we were in touch, meant a lot to me.

  • resvg: worth having in Debian?

    ...MPL 2.0-licensed SVG rendering and optimisation library and a tool, written in Rust.

  • Speeding up Open vSwitch with partial hardware offloading

    Open vSwitch (OVS) can use the kernel datapath or the userspace datapath. There are interesting developments in the kernel datapath using hardware offloading through the TC Flower packet classifier, but in this article, the focus will be on the userspace datapath accelerated with the Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) and its new feature—partial flow hardware offloading—to accelerate the virtual switch even more.

    This article explains how the virtual switch worked before versus now and why the new feature can potentially save resources while improving the packet processing rate.

    Open vSwitch (OVS) can use the kernel datapath or the userspace datapath. There are interesting developments in the kernel datapath using hardware offloading through the TC Flower packet classifier, but in this article, the focus will be on the userspace datapath accelerated with the Data Plane Development Kit (DPDK) and its new feature—partial flow hardware offloading—to accelerate the virtual switch even more.

    This article explains how the virtual switch worked before versus now and why the new feature can potentially save resources while improving the packet processing rate.

  • Alibaba invests in open source tech with data Artisans

    Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba Group has acquired German startup data Artisans (dA) to build an initiative around Big Data open source technologies.

    The move is also aimed at developing stream processing, batch processing and machine learning for developers to leverage in areas like artificial intelligence, Internet of Things and other real-time processing applications.

    As per local media reports, the deal has been valued at EUR 90 million. While both firms issued official statements, the details of the deal were not disclosed.

  • Next C++ workshop: 10 January 2019 at 19:00 UTC

    Yes, we’re running another C++ workshop, where you can watch a video about a specific feature of the language, then join our community of developers for a live discussion!

  • The Open Source LMS in 2019 – A Moodle Wishlist & Trends to Watch: A Look At The World
  • UK is testing self-driving Mars rovers

    Despite the fact that landing on Mars is hard, robotic rovers and landers have now become a regular feature of Mars exploration. These advanced exploratory machines are sending back unprecedented information about this fascinating red world. One limitation, however, has been that rovers and landers are still, for the most part, controlled by human operators back on Earth. On January 2, 2019, the U.K. government announced the testing of new software that’ll help make future rovers more autonomous – “smarter” and more capable of making their own decisions, such as deciding where to go and how to get there – i.e. self-driving.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Linux Thursday - Jan 4, 2019 - New Year Edition
  • One Week at a Time | Coder Radio 339

    Mike’s just had the talk, and now it’s time to make some changes. Including admitting he was wrong about Swift.

    Plus we read some feedback, answer some questions, and destroy another computer.

  • How To Understand And Identify File types in Linux
  • How to add data into MySQL tables from the command line
  • Integration of sandboxed Qt applications

    We have been using various tweaks to make sandboxed Qt apps well integrated into the system. For KDE Plasma integration, we have been allowing access to kdeglobals config file, where we store the most common configuration, like used icon theme, widget style, etc. A similar approach has been used by Gnome, where they need to allow access to DConf, otherwise applications will not be able to read default system configuration. These tweaks have been usually set in the runtimes and applications using these runtimes automatically inherited all the needed permissions during the build. This has some weak spots, because changing permissions in the runtime requires all applications to be rebuild to pick up the changes, or applications not using the runtimes at all had to allow all the access themself and really not everyone knows what everything needs to be enabled.

  • Fedora Firefox heads to updates with PGO/LTO.

    I’ve had lots of fun with GCC performance tuning at Fedora but without much results. When Mozilla switched its official builds to clang I considered that too due to difficulties with GCC PGO/LTO setup and inferior Fedora Firefox builds speed compared to Mozilla official builds.

    That movement woke up GCC fans to parry that threat. Lots of arguments were brought to that ticket about clang insecurity and missing features. More importantly upstream developer Honza Hubicka found and fixed profile data generation bug (beside the others) and Jakub Jelinek worked out a GCC bug which caused Firefox crash at startup.

  • Will the world embrace Plan S, the radical proposal to mandate open access to science papers?
  • Apple’s Biggest Problem? My Mom

    But the most consequential hit to Apple’s bottom line may be from people who are holding on to their phones for longer. Back in 2015, iPhones were being replaced after roughly two years, on average, according to BayStreet Research, a firm that tracks smartphone sales. That period has jumped to roughly three years, and is expected to grow even more.

  • Aquantia Announces Multi-Gig Ethernet Controllers, Coming Soon To ASUS Boards

    Separately, Intel has been prepping their own 2.5G Ethernet controllers and as of Linux 4.20 is already the "IGC" Intel 2.5G Ethernet driver.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Kubernetes Dominates in IT Job Searches

    Kubernetes was the dominant technology skill requested by IT firms in 2018, according to a new report from jobs board Dice.

    The report, which scoured the site’s job postings, found that “Kubernetes” was far and away the skill most requested by IT recruiters and hiring managers. Nate Swanner, editor of Dice Insights, noted that Kubernetes – and to a lesser extent Terraform – led the demand of skill requests toward “containerization of apps and services, as well as the cloud.” Terraform is an infrastructure as code software by HashiCorp.

    “The popularity of these two skills suggests that companies are continuing to invest in designing their own scalable stacks that use cloud services such as [Amazon Web Services] or Azure for storage and compute,” Swanner wrote.

  • Linaro announces appointment of new CEO Li Gong

    Li Gong joins Linaro following more than two decades of senior leadership and technical roles at companies including Sun, Microsoft, and Mozilla. In addition to having more than 20 US patents, three books, and numerous technical papers, Li Gong has been involved in open source technologies and collaborative engineering for over twenty years, including his significant contribution and leadership roles for the Java platform and for Firefox/Firefox OS.

  • Ansible Bender in OKD #2
  • Setting up a Minimalistic Ubuntu Installation
  • Improvements to apt-file since stretch

    The list of changes for apt-file in buster is rather short, but I would still like to mention a few of them in this post.

  • Spotify Tops Ubuntu's Snap Store Downloads While GIMP Tops Flatpak's Flathub

    At the end of 2018, Canonical's Alan Pope shared the most popular Snap packages for 2018. Now there's a similar list out of the folks maintaining Flathub for Flatpak packages. The list of popular applications is quite different between these app sandboxing/distribution means.

  • Redis in-memory storage

    Redis (Remote directory server) [1] is an open source, in-memory data structure store that can be used as a database, cache, and message broker. It supports a wide range of data structures, such as strings, hashes, lists, sets, bitmaps, HyperLogLogs, and geospatial indexes. Redis servers can be loaded locally, or they are available as web-hosted solutions. Redis libraries are available for a wide variety of programming languages.

  • Joomla 4.0 on the Horizon, More Open Source News

    The Joomla project has announced the availability of Joomla 4.0 Alpha 6 for testing purposes only. The announcement represents another big step toward the imminent release of Joomla 4.0.

    The primary objectives of this Alpha release are to provide developers with a basis to test their custom extensions and report any bugs and issues before the publication of the final release, and to become familiar with the new features that will be introduced in Joomla 4.0.

  • Opening government data, new life for Mozilla Labs, a bug bounty program, and more news

    In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look making government data open in the U.S., German state funding an open source e-health app, the return of Mozilla Labs, and more

  • The Quest to Topple Science-Stymying Academic Paywalls

    SCIENCE IS BUILT, enhanced, and developed through the open and structured sharing of knowledge. Yet some publishers charge so much for subscriptions to their academic journals that even the libraries of the world’s wealthiest universities such as Harvard are no longer able to afford the prices. Those publishers’ profit margins rival those of the most profitable companies in the world, even though research is largely underwritten by governments, and the publishers don’t pay authors and researchers or the peer reviewers who evaluate those works. How is such an absurd structure able to sustain itself—and how might we change it?

    When the World Wide Web emerged in the ’90s, people began predicting a new, more robust era of scholarship based on access to knowledge for all. The internet, which started as a research network, now had an easy-to-use interface and a protocol to connect all of published knowledge, making each citation just a click away … in theory.

    Instead, academic publishers started to consolidate. They solidified their grip on the rights to prestigious journals, allowing them to charge for access and exclude the majority of the world from reading research publications—all while extracting billions in dollars of subscription fees from university libraries and corporations. This meant that some publishers, such as Elsevier, the science, technology, and medicine-focused branch of the RELX Group publishing conglomerate, are able today to extract huge margins—36.7 percent in 2017 in Elsevier’s case, more profitable than Apple, Google/Alphabet, or Microsoft that same year.

  • Presenting the PLOS ONE Open Quantum Computation and Simulation collection

    We are pleased to present the first papers of the PLOS ONE collection on Open Quantum Computation and Simulation to the public. Quantum information and technologies have experienced an enormous boost in the last couple of years moving from a purely academic environment to new realms in advanced research centers, startups and corporate companies. This transition requires new methodologies and approaches to fruitfully achieve the challenging goals set out by this research program.

  • The Solderdoodle Open Source Iron Rides Again

    Now, [Isaac] is back with an updated version he calls the Solderdoodle Plus. It’s still based on the heating element from the Weller BP645, but now boasts twice the power, an improved 3D printed case, an intuitive touch-based user interface, and even some LED blinkenlights for good measure. As with the original Solderdoodle the hardware and software for the device are open source and you’re invited to build your own, though kits are also available through an already fully-funded Kickstarter campaign.

    [Isaac] says that the temperature control functions on traditional corded soldering irons waste energy due to the large thermal mass they have to bring up to temperature. But with less thermal mass and a system of variable duty cycle pulsed power, he says the Solderdoodle Plus can do the same work as an old-school 60 watt iron while only consuming 10 watts. This allows the iron to maintain a constant 500°C for over an hour on the dual internal Panasonic NCR18500A lithium-ion batteries, and means you can charge it up with nothing more exotic than a micro USB cable.

  • How Trulia began paying down its technical debt

    As every software company knows, over time as code ages and workarounds build on work-arounds, the code base becomes bloated. It becomes ever more difficult to get around the technical debt that you’ve built up over time. It’s really impossible to avoid this phenomenon, but at some point, companies realize that the debt is so great that it’s limiting their ability to build new functionality. That’s precisely what Trulia faced in 2017 when it began a process of paying down that debt and modernizing its architecture.

    Trulia is a real estate site founded way back in 2005, an eternity ago in terms of technology. The company went public in 2012 and was acquired by Zillow in 2014 for $3.5 billion, but has continued to operate as an independent brand under the Zillow umbrella. It understood that a lot had changed technologically in the 12 years since its inception when engineering began thinking about this. The team knew it had a humongous, monolithic code base that was inhibiting the ability to update the site.

today's leftovers

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  • Essential System Tools: fdupes – find or delete duplicate files

    This is the latest in our series of articles highlighting essential system tools. These are small, indispensable utilities, useful for system administrators as well as regular users of Linux based systems. The series examines both graphical and text based open source utilities. For this article, we’ll look at fdupes. For details of all tools in this series, please check the summary page.

    Even though the cost of storage per GB continues to fall, it’s common for users to need to find and remove duplicates files. The process of finding and removing duplicates is time-consuming. Fortunately, there are a number of tools that are designed to remove the laborious nature of finding duplicates. fdupes is a tool that we gravitate towards.

    The software finds duplicate files in a given set of directories and sub-directories. It recognizes duplicates by comparing MD5 signature of files followed by a byte-to-byte comparison. The utility offers a lot of options to list, delete and replace files.

  • Launching LiteCLI

    Today we are happy to announce the launch of LiteCLI!

    LiteCLI is a user-friendly CommandLine client for SQLite database.

  • MKVToolNix 30.0.0 Released with W64 Support

    MKVToolNix 30.0.0 was released today with new features, enhancements, and bug-fixes.

  •  

  • Bastian Ilsø Hougaard: 2019 – New directions

    GNOME Release Videos Needs New Hands!

    It’s hard for me to let go, but reason tells me that it is time to pass on the torch with release video production for the time being. 10 videos is a great round number and a good place for me to step down. None of them were ever a stand-alone project and I deeply thank everyone for their contributions, small and big! I’m far from convinced that I have hit the right magic release video flavor yet, but they require a large concentration of time that I no longer have on my hands to give. That said, get in touch if you are interested in being the next video production person! I will gladly supervise, pass on necessary details and give feedback in the process of it all. I’m unfortunately hard to get hold off on IRC/matrix these days, but quiet easy to get hold of on telegram and e-mail.

  • Episode 11: Moving the Chairs

    Katherine Druckman and Doc Searls talk to Petros Koutoupis about his Deep Dive articles, storage, blockchain, and moving chairs.

  • Back to our /roots | TechSNAP 393

    In a special new year’s episode we take a moment to reflect on the show’s past, its future, and say goodbye to an old friend.

today's leftovers

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  • mintCast 299 Last Episode of 2018
  • Linux Thursday - Dec 27, 2018
  • Sparky news 2018/12

    ...the latest Linux kernel has been rebuild which features many missing options enabled now, so upgrade it to version 4.20.0-2

  • Tech Mahindra Launches An Open Source AI Platform GAiA Powered By Acumos

    Tech Mahindra recently launched GAiA, an open-source AI platform that will enable enterprises across the industry to build, share and deploy AI-driven services and applications to solve business-critical problems. Also, GAiA is the first enterprise edition of open source AI platform Acumos.

  • 3 serverless platform approaches to consider

    Once you decide to move to a serverless architecture, it's important to realize this is just a place to start. Now, there are several paths you can take and lots of questions to ask yourself before you choose a specific architectural approach.  

    For example, will you choose a commercial or an open-source-based option? You can opt for loosely coupled tools or a well-integrated development platform. Will you use the serverless platform for hobby projects, or is it for serious enterprise applications?

    Serverless technologies change quickly. So, before you choose a platform, evaluate all of your options. Let's review what's available today.

today's leftovers

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  • wrap up: debootstrap in 2018
  • Richard W.M. Jones: Haiku!
  • Erase unconscious bias from your AI datasets

    Artificial intelligence failures often generate a lot of laughs when they make silly mistakes like this goofy photo. However, "the problem is that machine learning gaffes aren't always funny … They can have pretty serious consequences for end users when the datasets that are used to train these machine learning algorithms aren't diverse enough," says Lauren Maffeo, a senior content analyst at GetApp.

    In her Lightning Talk, "Erase unconscious bias from your AI datasets," at All Things Open 2018, October 23 in Raleigh, NC, Lauren describes some of the grim implications and advocated for developers to take measures to protect people from machine learning and artificial intelligence bias.

  • Google deprecating desktop Chromecast setup for Mac and PC with Chrome 72

    The Chromecast celebrated its fifth anniversary this year and was Google’s first big hardware success. It is a very affordable and easy to use streaming device, though an upcoming update next month will remove the ability to set the dongle up from Chrome for Mac, Windows, and Linux.

  • A message from Richard M. Stallman

    This year, I'm happy to report, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) received two large donations, each nominally a million dollars.

    The donation from the Pineapple Fund arrived in the form of Bitcoin and had gone down to around $860,000 by the time we could convert it all to dollars. Around half of the donation from Handshake is earmarked for specific software projects; some of that will go to improving Replicant, the free Android fork, but that half won't help fund the FSF's general operations.

    We will need to add part of these donations to our reserves, which are meant to enable us to keep operating in the case of a possible downturn. That still leaves enough to expand our staff by two or three positions. We will be able to do some of the work that always needed doing but that we could not undertake.

  • Lawrence Roberts, One Of Early Internet Pioneers, Dies At 81

    Among the early architects of the internet, who helped shape the internet as it is today, Lawrence Roberts is a prominent name. He was the program manager for ARPAnet — a precursor to the internet.

    Sadly, he died on December 26th at the age of 81. Even though he was a public figure for the internet as much as Tim Berners-Lee or Vint Cerf, the key decisions he made ended up deciding how the internet behaves today.

Top 2018 News and "We Respin You A Merry Christmas"

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  • Major acquisitions, Kubernetes evolution top IT news in 2018

    After several years of containerization growth filling the top IT news slots, 2018 closed out with major container and DevOps-related updates, fixes, acquisitions and partnerships.

    These top ten stories from the second half of 2018, in no particular order, captured the attention of IT operations admins, container managers, IT directors and other industry professionals.

    [...]

    Kubernetes has emerged as the industry's ubiquitous container orchestration tool, but it won't match every enterprise's security requirements from the get-go. Some default settings break security guidelines, such as the API server connecting to the unsecured network port 8080. Pariseau describes the security concerns of users deploying containers in production with Kubernetes.

  • Destination Linux EP101 – We Respin You A Merry Christmas

    On this episode of Destination Linux, we discuss some distro news for Peppermint Linux, GParted Live & Ubuntu. We cover some application news for Firefox, VirtualBox and more. Later in the show, we’ll talk about some unfortunate news regarding SQLite and Valve’s Artifact. We’ll also cover so great discussion topics like Photography on Linux and the pros and cons of Headerbars. All that and much more including our Tips, Tricks and Software Spotlight picks!

today's leftovers

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  • Nor-Tech Refreshes Existing HPC Supercomputers for Big Data Applications AI, DL, ML

    The project includes installation of Bright Cluster Manager; Scientific Linux 7.x, 16; PBS Pro Job Scheduler; and Bioinformatics software.

    Nor-Tech Executive Vice President Jeff Olson said, “We have an engineering team that rivals those at the top HPC technology companies in the world. Coupled with access to the brain trusts at organizations such as Intel, NVIDIA, Bright, Linux, etc., we can build and refresh HPC technology for almost any application.”

  • Open Source Domain Controller

    Is there an open source domain controller (DC) worth considering? There are a number of open source DCs available and many of them could end up representing interesting solutions for your organization. Often, solutions pertaining to the directory services realm end up functioning as domain controllers for organizations. Many of the solutions considered are either OpenLDAP™, FreeIPA, Samba, and a slew of others.

  • Using JupyterHub as a generic application spawner

    As part of my day job I occasionally need to give workshops on using OpenShift, Red Hat's distribution of Kubernetes. The workshop notes that attendees follow to do the exercises we host using an internally developed tool called workshopper. We host the workshop notes using this tool inside of the same OpenShift cluster that users will be working in.

    To access the OpenShift cluster and do the exercises, attendees use the OpenShift command line clients oc or odo. They may also need to use kubectl. Because these are client side tools they would need to be installed somewhere where the attendees can run them, usually this is on their own local computer.

    Requiring that attendees install a client on their own local computer can often be a challenge. This is because when dealing with enterprise customers, their employee's computers may be locked down such that they are unable to install any additional software.

    A solution one often sees to this problem is to enhance the tool used to host the workshop notes to embed an interactive terminal which is then used through the web browser. Behind the scenes that terminal would be connected up to some backend system where a shell environment is run for the specific user accessing the workshop. Finally, in that shell environment they would have access to all the command line tools, as well as other files, that may be needed for that workshop.

  • 2018’s Deal Channels | Coder Radio 337

    The guys drink some Liquid Christmas Tree and reflect on the major trends of 2018, and the stuff they are preemptively freaking out about for 2019.

  • The Real McCoy | BSD Now 278

    We sat down at BSDCan 2018 to interview Kirk McKusick about various topics ranging about the early years of Berkeley Unix, his continuing work on UFS, the governance of FreeBSD, and more.

  • TableView and Qt 5.12 / Qt Creator 4.8

    I finally got around to doing the final merge for QmlBook this year.

    I just merged the chapter on the brand new TableView. This let’s you show 2D data tables in an efficient way.

    I also merged the version upgrade, so the text should now reflect what is available from Qt 5.12 and be based on menus and screens from Qt Creator 4.8.

  • Sparky repos changed

    There is a change in the Sparky repository as of 27 December 2018.

  • Best of 2018: Fedora for developers

    Building custom apps in Python on Fedora — using either a Python IDE that helps you learn understand the language, or a popular editor that also works with many other languages. And what about Rust — a very fast and safe programming language. Yes, it’s been a whole year again! What a great time to look back at the most popular articles on the Fedora Magazine written by our awesome contributors.

  • PyPy Winter Sprint Feb 4-9 in Düsseldorf
  • Host your website safely and avoid website cross-contamination issues

    This article discusses the hidden pitfalls of hosting multiple websites on one hosting account, and how you can remediate the consequences of website cross-contamination.

    The structure of virtual hosting (also known as shared hosting) can be illustrated by a bee hive: each website (bee) has its own folder (cell). At the same time, all bees share the same hive (hosting account resources, such as disk space, database, RAM, CPU, etc.).

    In most cases, hosting companies do not provide resource isolation for shared hosting accounts (plans that let you host multiple websites on one account). In practice, that means that all website files are owned by the same system user, and server scripts (using PHP, Python, Perl, etc.) on each website on the account run with equal access rights. So, we get into a situation where the scripts of one website on the account may create, remove or modify any file on any other website hosted on the same shared hosting account.

    [...]

    I hope this information helps you to avoid mass infection or hacking issues with your websites, or, if this has already happened, effectively resolve the incident. Along with professional security advice, a comprehensive security solution such as Imunify360 is essential to keep such incidents from happening in the first place.

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Windows is coming to your Chromebook [Ed: Did Google management exchange this for Chromium code in Microsoft Windows and, if so, why not add GNU/Linux ('proper') as a booting option? Who does Google work for?]

    In the short term, since Campfire is built on Eve, Chrome OS for the Pixelbook, you can expect to see it appear on that top-of-the-line Chromebook first.

  • Freescale and NXP PowerPC Microprocessors Protected Against Spectre, Chromebook to Support Dual-Boot Mode, Bloodstained: Ritual of the Night Game Kickstarted Campaign Cancels Linux Port

    For those who absolutely need those one or two applications from Windows, the Chromebook will soon officially supports a dual-boot mode in which users can install both Windows and Chrome OS side-by-side. Unlike the Linux app support within Chrome OS, this new feature will allow you to run one of operating systems at a time.

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Security: Nest Lockout, Moment of Truth for Cyber Insurance, DNS Hijacking Attacks and Australian Cracking

  • Nest is locking customers out of accounts until they fix their security

    Emails were sent last night to all users that may have been affected by recent [breaches], with a new password being mandatory, as it tries to avoid the "I'll do it later" attitude that means that often vulnerable passwords remain in use for months or years.

  • A Moment of Truth for Cyber Insurance

    Mondelez’s claim represents just a fraction of the billions of dollars in collateral damage caused by NotPetya, a destructive, indiscriminate cyberattack of unprecedented scale, widely suspected to have been launched by Russia with the aim of hurting Ukraine and its business partners. A compromised piece of Ukrainian accounting software allowed NotPetya to spread rapidly around the world, disrupting business operations and causing permanent damage to property of Mondelez and many others. According to reports, Zurich apparently rejected Mondelez’s claim on the grounds that NotPetya was an act of war and, therefore, excluded from coverage under its policy agreement. If the question of whether and how war risk exemptions apply is left to the courts to decide on a case-by-case basis, this creates a profound source of uncertainty for policyholders about the coverage they obtain.

  • A Deep Dive on the Recent Widespread DNS Hijacking Attacks

    The U.S. government — along with a number of leading security companies — recently warned about a series of highly complex and widespread attacks that allowed suspected Iranian hackers to siphon huge volumes of email passwords and other sensitive data from multiple governments and private companies. But to date, the specifics of exactly how that attack went down and who was hit have remained shrouded in secrecy.

    This post seeks to document the extent of those attacks, and traces the origins of this overwhelmingly successful cyber espionage campaign back to a cascading series of breaches at key Internet infrastructure providers.

  • With elections weeks away, someone “sophisticated” [cracked] Australia’s politicians

    With elections just three months away, Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced on February 18 that the networks of the three major national political parties had been breached by what Australian security officials described as a "sophisticated state actor."

  • Australia's major political parties [cracked] in 'sophisticated' attack ahead of election

    Sources are describing the level of sophistication as "unprecedented" but are unable to say yet which foreign government is behind the attack.

  • Parliament attackers appear to have used Web shells

    Attackers who infiltrated the Australian Parliament network and also the systems of the Liberal, National and Labor Parties appear to have used Web shells – scripts that can be uploaded to a Web server to enable remote administration of a machine.

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