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today's leftovers

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Misc
  • Look Munich, City of Barcelona Is Dumping Windows and Switches to Ubuntu Linux

    While the City of Munich is switching back to Windows after running Linux on their public PCs, a move that will cost them over €100 million euros, the City of Barcelona is making the smart choice of dumping Microsoft's products and switch to Linux and Open Source.

    First spotted by It's FOSS, this fantastic news was reported by Spanish newspaper El País, stating that the City of Barcelona is currently in talks of migrating all of their public computer systems to Open Source software products like LibreOffice and Open-Xchange, replacing Microsoft's expensive products.

  • Clipboard Anywhere – A Multi-Platform Lightweight Clipboard App

    Clipboard Anywhere is a free, lightweight, and cloud-enabled clipboard application with which you can copy to and paste from its clipboard universally synced across all connected devices.

    It is important to remember that Clipboard Anywhere is NOT a clipboard manager app but simply a clipboard app via which you can have texts and images that you copy on your desktop available on your mobile devices and vice versa.

  • Storaji – A Free, Modern Lightweight Inventory Management System

    Storaji is a free, Electron-powered, open-source and lightweight Inventory Management System. Its development is aimed at Middle-Low Companies who might not be able to afford the license for similar applications to manage their stock.

  • How to Install Snipe-IT Asset Management Software on Debian 9
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  • Introducing a Full Self-hosted Audio/video and Chat Communication Platform: Nextcloud Talk

    We’re very proud to announce today Nextcloud Talk, the first enterprise-ready, self-hosted communication technology giving users the highest degree of control over their data and communication. Nextcloud Talk is a fully open source video meeting software, on-premise hosted and end-to-end encrypted. It features a text chat and is available for web and mobile. In related news, Nextcloud has become the vendor with the greatest momentum in the self-hosted Enterprise File Sync and Share market and increased its customer base by 7 times in 2017. And over 500 individuals contributed more than 6.6 million lines of code to Nextcloud last year!

  • Nextcloud Talk is an Open Source Alternative to Google Hangouts

    Nextcloud has launched a self-hosted open source alternative to Google Hangouts, Skype, and similar chat services.

    Called ‘Nextcloud Talk’, the feature brings audio, video and messaging features based on WebRTC to the personal cloud server software, which was forked from OwnCloud back in 2016.

  • Nextcloud Rolls Out Audio/Video/Chat Support

    The Nextcloud cloud hosting software forked from ownCloud now has audio/video/chat abilities.

  • Krita Digital Painting Program Hits The 4.0 Beta Milestone

    The KDE/Qt-aligned Krita digital painting program has released its first beta release of the major 4.0 update that also marks its string freeze. Now marks the period of bug fixing before shipping Krita 4.0 within a few months.

  • Fedora 28 Looking To Replace Glibc's libcrypt With libxcrypt

    As upstream Glibc is working on deprecating libcrypt for its eventual removal from the codebase, Fedora developers are looking at using libxcrypt for their hashing/encoding crypto library.

    Some Fedora / Red Hat developers have been working on libxcrypt as the distribution's potential replacement to libcrypt. Libxcrypt is inspired in part by Openwall Linux, supports most all password hashing algorithms, offers a faster development cycle, and makes adding new hashing algorithms easy.

  • Sleep Fast, Sleep Hard with the Pzizz Android App
  • Five Ways to Free Up Space on Your Android Device
  • New Python3, LibreOffice, Google RE2 Packages Released in Tumbleweed

    Several openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots arrive before and after the new year and this post will focus on the most recent snapshots released this week.

    Much of the efforts of developers this week have focused on patching the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities. openSUSE’s rolling distribution produced four openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots so far this week.

    While the Long-Term Support 4.4 Linux Kernel has patched many of the vulnerabilities associated with Meltdown and Spectre, the 4.14.12 Linux Kernel released in snapshot 20180107  hasn’t, but Tumbleweed users will likely see the vulnerabilities patched soon.

  • openSUSE Conference Registration, Call For Papers Opens Today

    openSUSE is pleased to announce that registration and the call for papers for the openSUSE Conference 2018 (oSC18), which takes place in Prague, Czech Republic, are open.

    The dates for this year’s conference will be May 25 through May 27 at Faculty of Information Technologies of Czech Technical University in Prague. Submission for the call for papers will be open until April 20. There are 99 day from today to submit a proposal, but don’t wait until the late minute. Registration will be open from today until the day oSC18 begins; make sure to answer the survey question regarding the T-Shirt size.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Automotive Grade Linux Hits the Road Globally with Toyota; Amazon Alexa Joins AGL to Support Voice Recognition

    Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open platform for the connected car, today announced that AGL is now in Toyota vehicles around the world. AGL also announced five new members, including Amazon Alexa, which joined as a Silver member.

    "Having AGL in vehicles on the road globally is a significant milestone for both AGL and the automotive open source community," said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at The Linux Foundation. "Toyota has been a strong proponent of open source for years, and we believe their adoption of an AGL-based infotainment system has set a precedent that other automakers will follow."

  • Intel Posts Initial Open-Source Graphics Driver Patches For Icelake "Gen 11" Hardware

    While Intel Cannonlake processors aren't out yet with their new "Gen 10" graphics hardware, Intel's Open-Source Technology Center has published their first graphics driver patches for Linux enablement of Icelake "Gen 11" hardware.

    Cannonlake CPUs will be shipping this year while Icelake is at least a year out, which will feature further improvements to the Intel onboard graphics. Intel OTC developers had posted their first GPU Linux driver patches last April for Cannonlake in order to get the support reviewed and upstream well ahead of the hardware launch.

  • Best free open source alternatives to Windows 10: What's the best open source OS?

    There will most likely be a learning curve involved with picking up an open source OS, but the community, customisation and cost (free) should definitely be enough to draw you in.

  • What is your favorite desktop Linux distribution?

    There are all sorts of reasons people take their pick. It could be based on familiarity, on the UI, on performance, on package availability, on stability, on support, or thousands of other factors. Every year, just once, we let you chime in and tell us your favorite.

    This year, in an effort to keep the conversation a little more focused, we're asking specifically, what's your favorite desktop distribution? And we're adding a few more choices this year. To be as fair as possible when it's impossible to list every distribution, we pulled the top 15 distributions according to DistroWatch over the past 12 months. It's not scientific—but it's something to start with, and we had to cull it down somehow.

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  • MAMA Cross Spotted in Red Hat Inc (RHT) Shares
  • A small 2017 retrospective

    In the ARM space there was quite a lot of achievements. The big one being the initial support of aarch64 SBCs (finally!), I was very proud of the work we achieved here, it’s a single install path with uEFI/grub2 and a single install path. More work in the short term, by a team of cross team distro people, which took us a lot longer than I’d hoped, but the outcome is a lot better experience for end users and a much more supportable platform for those that need to support it moving forward! It was no means our only achievement with a lot of other ARM improvements including on the Raspberry Pi, accelerated GPUs, initial support for the 96boards platforms. Three is of coarse already LOTS of work in motion for the ARM architectures in 2018 and I’m sure it’ll be as fun and insanely busy as always but I feel we’re now going into it with a good base for the aarch64 SBCs which will rapidly expand in the devices we support moving forward!

  • Razer’s Project Linda Turns Your Phone Into A Breathtaking Laptop

    Project Linda is basically a dock that lets you seamlessly dock your Android-powered Razer Phone at the place where the touchpad usually resides (see picture below). Once you connect the phone, the 5.7-inch display becomes a touchpad; it can alternatively be used as a second screen. With the press of a button, a USB-C port inserts inside the phone.

  • Most popular Tizen Apps / Games downloaded in 2017

    In a past life (a couple of weeks ago), we used to report on the previous months Tizen apps that had been downloaded from the Tizen Apps Store. Now, we have a list of the Top 20 Tizen Apps / Games for the whole of 2017. This will be our last round-up of the Tizen Store and I’m doing this more out of nostalgia than anything else.

  • 8 Best Free Android Music Players | 2018 Edition

    Android smartphones come with a default music player for audio playback. So, why should you look for an alternate music player? Because the default player might not be feature-rich, it might not provide you with a satisfactory equalizer or its user interface might not be convenient. For instance, most devices nowadays come with Google Play Music as the default music player. It is simple and does the job, but lacks features like folder view in the library, the ability to edit tags for files and many other necessary tools.

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today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Libstorage-NG Landing Soon In openSUSE Tumbleweed For Improving The Installer

    Users of the openSUSE rolling-release Linux distribution will soon find an improved installer thanks to Libstorage-NG landing soon and improvements to YaST.

    Libstorage is a low-level storage library used by SUSE's YaST for dealing with disk / partition / LVM management and other storage device interaction. For over the past two years, libstorage-ng has been in development as the next-generation implementation.

  • Debbugs Versioning: Merging

    One of the key features of Debbugs, the bug tracking system Debian uses, is its ability to figure out which bugs apply to which versions of a package by tracking package uploads. This system generally works well, but when a package maintainer's workflow doesn't match the assumptions of Debbugs, unexpected things can happen.

  • Ubuntu Server Development Summary – 09 Jan 2018

    The purpose of this communication is to provide a status update and highlights for any interesting subjects from the Ubuntu Server Team. If you would like to reach the server team, you can find us at the #ubuntu-server channel on Freenode. Alternatively, you can sign up and use the Ubuntu Server Team mailing list.

  • LXD Weekly Status #29

    And we’re back from the holidays!
    This “weekly” summary is covering everything that happened the past 3 weeks.

    The big highlight was the release of LXD 2.21 on the 19th of December.

    During the holidays, we merged quite a number of bugfixes and smaller features in LXC and LXD with the bigger feature development only resuming now.

    The end of year was also the deadline for our users to migrate off of the LXD PPAs.
    Those have now been fully deleted and users looking for newer builds of LXD should use the official basckport packages or the LXD snap.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • What I See for LJ 2.0: in a Word, Community

    It has been too long, but I was at least one of the founders of the Seattle UNIX User's Group. I remember the first meeting well. It took place at Seattle University, and our guest speaker was Bill Joy. He impressed me in that he had a huge pile of overhead transparencies (remember, this was in the 1980s), asked a few questions of the group, selected some of them and started talking. He was right on target.

    My point is that I became a UNIX geek in about 1980, and although UNIX was hot stuff at Bell Labs, it wasn't exactly a household word. The users group was our tool to build the community.

    In the 1980s, I was running a small company that published UNIX reference cards and did UNIX training and consulting. I chose UNIX because I saw a need for decent documentation and training. We were filling that void.

  • Nouveau NVC0 Gallium3D Lands OpenGL Bindless Texture Support

    Longtime Nouveau Gallium3D contributor Ilia Mirkin has landed OpenGL bindless texture (ARB_bindless_texture) support within Mesa 17.4-dev Git.

    ARB_bindless_texture is an important OpenGL extension for reducing the API and OpenGL driver overhead of resource bindings and allows accessing texture objects without first needing to bind/re-bind them. RadeonSI has already supported this extension as it's needed for Feral's port of Dawn of War III for Linux. This extension isn't currently mandated through OpenGL 4.6 but is important for "AZDO" purposes.

  • Phoronix Test Suite 7.8 Milestone 1 Released
  • Salsa webhooks and integrated services

    Since many years now, Debian is facing an issue with one of its most important services: alioth.debian.org (Debian's forge). It is used by most the teams and hosts thousands of repositories (of all sorts) and mailing-lists. The service was stable (and still is), but not maintained. So it became increasingly important to find its replacement.

    Recently, a team for volunteers organized a sprint to work on the replacement of Alioth. I was very skeptical about the status of this new project until... tada! An announcement was sent out about the beta release of this new service: salsa.debian.org (a GitLab CE instance). Of course, Salsa hosts only Git repositories and doesn't deal with other {D,}VCSes used on Alioth (like Darcs, Svn, CVS, Bazaar and Mercurial) but it is a huge step forward!

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Houston-based Linux Journal is rescued and reborn

    Linux Journal, the Houston-based publication that covered and championed the open-source computer operating system for 23 years, won't shut down after all.

    Publisher Carlie Fairchild said Monday in a post to the Linux Journal website that the online magazine has been "rescued" by Private Internet Access VPN, a company owned by London Trust Media of Denver.

  • Dell Rolls Out New XPS 13 Laptop For 2018

    Just ahead of the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Dell has unveiled a new XPS 13 high-end laptop.

    The new XPS 13 makes use of Intel's 8th Gen CPUs, the laptop chassis has been improved upon, and the battery life is said to be better than last year's model. From a far the laptop looks similar to the previous XPS 13 but is now a little bit thinner and lighter with a 2.68 pound weight and measures in at 11.9 x 7.8 x 0.46 inches. The bezel on this new laptop comes in at just 4mm.

  • Amazon changes cloud computing strategy with launch of Linux 2

    Amazon has released its own version of the open-source Linux operating system for enterprise customers who use its cloud offering – Amazon Web Services – which will run both on clients’ computers as well as in the cloud.

    This marks a shift in Amazon’s cloud computing strategy as it earlier did not allow similar operating systems to run on its clients’ servers, but rather on Amazon-owned data centres. Reports suggest the company will allow its cloud customers to rent access to its new operating system, which it calls Linux 2, but will also allow clients to install the new OS on its own servers.

  • [Podcast] PodCTL Basics – Understanding Service Meshes

    We’re back and excited about all the cool new innovation happening around microservice architectures. We kick off 2018 with an introductory discussion about “Service Mesh” technologies, such as Istio, Envoy and Linkerd, and how they apply to modern application architectures.

  • Debian/TeX Live 2017.20180103-1

    The new year has arrived, but in the TeX world not much has changed – we still get daily updates in upstream TeX Live, and once a month I push them out to Debian. So here is roughly the last month of changes.

today's leftovers: OpenWrt/LEDE, Mapzen and More

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Misc
  • Now What?

    Linux Journal was a print magazine for 17+ years, then a digital one for the next 7+. What shall we be now? That's the Big Question, and there are many answers, some of which are already settled.

  • Steve Jobs’s worst decision was promoting Tim Cook

    Fifteen years later, 2 billion smartphones have shipped worldwide, and Microsoft’s mobile OS share is just 1%.

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  • Amazon Linux Moves Beyond the Cloud to On-Premises Deployments

    For nearly as long as Amazon Web Services (AWS) has been in operation there has been a Amazon Linux operating system that runs on it. Initially Amazon Linux was just an optimized version of Red Hat's community Fedora Linux, adjusted to work on AWS, but it has evolved over the years.

  • The future of DevOps is mastery of multi-cloud environments

    DevOps is a set of practices that automates the processes between software development and IT teams so they can build, test, and release software more quickly and reliably. The concept of DevOps is founded on building a culture of collaboration between IT and business teams, which have historically functioned in relative siloes. The promised benefits include increased trust, faster software releases, and the ability to solve critical issues quickly.

    That said, implementing a successful DevOps organization requires IT leaders to think more broadly about how to spur a cultural and organizational shift within both their team and the broader organization, as opposed to simply deploying new technologies. A successful DevOps strategy requires a merged focus from both development teams and operational teams on what the company needs to meet its digital transformation objectives. Thus, it is about breaking down siloed groups of people and responsibilities, and—in their place—building teams that can multitask on technical issues and goals.

  • The Linux 2017 GOTY Awards are now open for nominations

    Continuing our tradition and a day later than last year, the Linux 2017 GOTY Awards are now open for nominations.

  • The Markets Are Undervaluing these stock’s: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), KB Home (KBH)
  • Announcing the OpenWrt/LEDE merge

    The OpenWrt and LEDE projects have announced their unification under the OpenWrt name. The old OpenWrt CC 15.05 release series will receive a limited amount of security and bug fixes, but the current LEDE 17.01 series is the most up-to-date.

  • Announcing the OpenWrt/LEDE merge

    Both the OpenWrt and LEDE projects are happy to announce their unification under the OpenWrt name.

    After long and sometimes slowly moving discussions about the specifics of the re-merge, with multiple similar proposals but little subsequent action, we're happy to announce that both projects are about to execute the final steps of the merger.

    The new, unified OpenWrt project will be governed under the rules established by the LEDE project. Active members of both the former LEDE and OpenWrt projects will continue working on the unified OpenWrt.

    LEDE's fork and subsequent re-merge into OpenWrt will not alter the overall technical direction taken by the unified project. We will continue to work on improving stability and release maintenance while aiming for frequent minor releases to address critical bugs and security issues like we did with LEDE 17.01 and its four point releases until now.

    Old pre-15.05 OpenWrt CC releases will not be supported by the merged project anymore, leaving these releases without any future security or bug fixes. The OpenWrt CC 15.05 release series will receive a limited amount of security and bug fixes, but is not yet fully integrated in our release automation, so binary releases are lacking behind for now.

  • GIS company Mapzen to shut down but users can still avail open-source data

    But for the admirers of the company, there is still a silver lining: as the data and code is available in open source and users will still be able to run the projects they built using Mapzen tools, as well as some of the company’s tools. Until February 1, when the company will shut down its APIs and support, users are free to grab all that they require.

  • Driving Open Standards in a Fragmented Networking Landscape

    Once upon a time, standards were our friends. They provided industry-accepted blueprints for building homogeneous infrastructures that were reliably interoperable. Company A could confidently build an application and — because of standards — know that it would perform as expected on infrastructure run by Company B.

    Standards have somewhat fallen out of favor as the speed of digital innovation has increased. Today innumerable software applications are created by innumerable developers at an accelerating pace. Standards — once critical for achieving interoperability — have failed to adapt in this brave new world.

    [...]

    The bottom line is that we need to accept that “the only constant is change.” Innovation in software can bring many good things, but we need to learn how we can eliminate the silos, guard against new ones forming, create better interoperability, and simplify operational complexity. The examples above show that by taking a programmatic approach to standards, this degree of interoperability can be achieved even today.

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • The mysterious case of the Linux Page Table Isolation patches

    tl;dr: there is presently an embargoed security bug impacting apparently all contemporary CPU architectures that implement virtual memory, requiring hardware changes to fully resolve. Urgent development of a software mitigation is being done in the open and recently landed in the Linux kernel, and a similar mitigation began appearing in NT kernels in November. In the worst case the software fix causes huge slowdowns in typical workloads. There are hints the attack impacts common virtualization environments including Amazon EC2 and Google Compute Engine, and additional hints the exact attack may involve a new variant of Rowhammer.

  • systemd Breached One Million Lines Of Code In 2017

    Systemd had a busy 2017 and its code-base is now up to over one million lines.

    Systemd in 2017 saw 3,443 commits, which is actually the lowest point since 2012. But the commits were larger with having 418,903 lines of code added and 119,975 lines removed: a net gain of nearly 300,000 lines of code.

  • NuTyX 10.0-rc1 is release

    The NuTyX team is proud to annonce the first release candidat of the next major version 10 of NuTyX.

  • Arcan 0.5.4, Durden 0.4

    From left to right, we have a little Raspberry  running the ‘prio’ WM using the broadcom binary blob drivers (so lacks some of the features needed to run durden), with arcan and terminals eating up all of 20MB of ram. The left Macbook running OSX with Arcan/Durden in fullscreen, retina resolution, of course. The Macbook on the right is running the same system on OpenBSD 6.2. The three-headed monkey behind them is a voidlinux setup with two instances, one on an intel GPU, the other on an AMD GPU. If only the android devices on the wall could be brought in on the fun as well…

  • Arcan 0.5.4 Display Server Released With Durden 0.4 Desktop

    Remember Arcan? The Linux display server built off a game engine. The project is ending 2017 with the release of the Arcan 0.5.4 display server and its associated Durden v0.4 desktop.

    With the Arcan 0.5.4 release, its X.Org-backend has been ported to OpenBSD, its VRbridge tool now has basic OpenHMD support, improvements to its Wayland protocol handling, and a lot more.

  • LinuxJournal, Which Ceased Publication Last Month Citing Poor Financial Condition, Secures Fresh Fund From Readers To Resume Operation

    LinuxJournal announced in Nov 2017 that they were going to cease publication; With some timely intervention by Private Internet Access they are going to be able to continue operation and are currently soliciting feedback for improving the magazine in the future.

today's leftovers

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Misc
  • EzeeLinux Show 18 0 | Linux Grows In 2017

    The very first “EzeeLinux Show!” We look ahead to 2018, revisit dual boot concerns and talk about MS and their evil ways.  Please be sure to give EzeeLinux a ‘Like’ on Facebook! Thanks!

  • Linux 4.14.10 and 4.9.73 LTS Kernels Are Available to Download, Update Now

    Renowned Linux kernel maintainer and developer Greg Kroah-Hartman announced a couple of days the release and immediate availability of the Linux 4.14.10 and 4.9.73 LTS kernels.

    While Linux kernel 4.9.73 LTS is a small patch that changes a total of 22 files with 191 insertions and 56 deletions, the Linux 4.14.10 kernel is a major one, changing no less than 116 files, with 4023 insertions and 3424 deletions. According to the appended shortlog, most of the changes included in Linux kernel 4.14.10 are related to merging of the x86 low-level prep for kernel page table isolation.

  • KVM Smokes VirtualBox On Initial AMD EPYC Linux Tests

    I've been working on some AMD EPYC virtualization tests on and off the past few weeks. For your viewing before ending out the year are some initial VirtualBox vs. Linux KVM benchmarks for seeing how the guest VM performance compares.

  • Resources for learning bash/shell scripting in GNU/Linux

    There is a stigma around the word Linux, where people generally envision people with glasses, beards, and look like a hippy programmer. Funny enough, this perfectly describes Richard Stallman, the creator of GNU, the actual operating system that we simply refer to as ‘Linux’ nowadays (much to his distaste.)

    However, part of this stigma, is also that GNU/Linux users are constantly glued to terminals, hacking away code constantly to run their operating system. This once upon a time wasn’t too far off, but nowadays most users may never even see the terminal.

    However, those who do wish to dive in deeper, and really see the true power behind using a CLI, may wish to learn shell programming / scripting. The applications of doing so, are virtually boundless; from automating to maintenance.

  • KDE Goal: Usability and Productivity

    It’s been an honor to have had the community select my KDE goal: focus on usability and productivity. This is a topic that’s quite dear to my heart, as I’ve always seen a computer for a vehicle for giving substance to your thoughts. Low-quality computer operating systems and software get in your way and knock you out of a state of flow, while high quality versions let you create at the speed of thought. KDE Plasma is already pretty good in this department, but I think we can make it even better–we can turn it into the obvious choice for people who need to get things done.

  • [Stable Update] 2017-12-31 – Kernels, Xorg-Server, Mesa, Compiz, Wine, Firefox

    this is our second try with Xorg-Server v1.19.6. This time we also updated our Mesa-Stack and changed the handling of dri/drm. Some reported Compiz not working with this. Therefore we had it updated to the latest source currently available.

    Friends of Gimp may try out the latest development edition of this fantastic graphical art app. Again we have the latest Firefox and Wine added. Also linux49 and linux414 got updated to their latest point-releases.

  • Source code for Apple's 1983 Lisa computer to be made public next year

    The museum's software curator, Al Kossow, announced to a public mailing list that the source code for the Lisa computer has been recovered and is with Apple for review. Once Apple clears the code, the museum plans to release it to the public with a blog post explaining the code's historic significance.

  • BSDCAN2017 Interview with Peter Hessler, Reyk Floeter, and Henning Brauer

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • So long, Linux Journal

    If you don't know, Linux Journal has ceased publication. Unless an investor drops in at the last minute, the LJ website will soon shut down. Thus ends over twenty-three years in Linux and open source publication. That's quite a legacy!

    Linux Journal first hit shelves in April 1994. To remind you about those times: that's when Linux reached the 1.0 version milestone. That's also the same year that I started the FreeDOS Project. Elsewhere in technology, Yahoo!, Amazon, and Netscape got their start in 1994. That's also the same year the shows E.R. and Friends first hit TV. Also that year, the movies Pulp Fiction, Forrest Gump, Speed, and Stargate.

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  • Earthlock: Festival of Magic to get a new edition, developer has 'not given up' on Linux yet

    The story of Earthlock: Festival of Magic [Official Site] is a little odd. The developer released a Linux alpha version back in 2016 and since then nothing has happened. A new edition has been announced and it's still somewhat positive for Linux.

  • Debian Policy call for participation -- December 2017

    Yesterday we released Debian Policy 4.1.3.0, containing patches from numerous different contributors, some of them first-time contributors. Thank you to everyone who was involved!

    Please consider getting involved in preparing the next release of Debian Policy, which is likely to be uploaded sometime around the end of January.

  • Q4 Preliminary Estimate of Nokia HMD Quarterly Sales is 5.4M and full year 2017 ends at 9.7M
  • The Essential Open Source Reading List: 21 Must-Read Books

    Is your organization looking to build out an open source program or are you already managing one? If so, you’re probably already considering the kinds of tools and guidance that can make your program a holistic success. That is why, in this article series, we have been covering tools for managing open source programs and providing advice from leading experts.

    Now, to take your program to the next level, we offer a free guide containing an essential open source reading list. This list can help any organization launch and maintain a thriving open source program.

    Specifically, the guide provides 21 must-read books for open source program managers, recommended by members of the TODO Group. These books can help your organization build a strong foundation and avoid missteps in developing your open source program.

  • Will tomorrow's core banking systems run on open-source software?
  • Apple to open source its first graphical OS from the Lisa
  • Mixed Blessings Of Greenfield Software Development

    The biggest software project I have ever worked on, and hopefully ever will work on, was Gecko. I was not one of its original architects, so my work on Gecko was initially very tightly constrained by design decisions made by others. Over the years some of those decisions were rescinded, and some of the new decisions were mine, but I always felt frustrated at being locked into designs that I didn't choose and (with the benefit of hindsight, at least) would not have chosen. "Wouldn't it be great", I often thought, "to build something entirely new from scratch, hopefully getting things right, or at least having no-one other than myself to blame for my mistakes!" I guess a lot of programmers feel this, and that's why we see more project duplication than the world really needs.

    I was lucky enough at Mozilla to work on a project that gave me a bit of an outlet for this — rr. I didn't actually do much coding in rr at the beginning — Albert Noll, Nimrod Partush and Chris Jones got it underway — but I did participate in the design decisions.

  • NodeSource Raises $17.5M to Advance Node.js Applications

    When looking to build and deploy enterprise applications in 2018, NodeSource and its' investors are betting that many will choose to use node.js

    Node.js is a widely deployed open-source JavaScript framework that NodeSource supports with its commercial N|Solid platform. On Dec. 25, NodeSource announced that it raised $17.5 million in a Series B round fo funding led by Silicon Valley Bank and Industry Ventures. Total funding to date for NodeSource now stands at $33.4 million, since the company was founded in 2014.

  • Apple’s flagship Chicago retail store wasn’t designed to handle snow [iophk: "typical for architecture everywhere: designed by non-locals"]

    Apple’s new flagship retail store in Chicago, the one with a MacBook-shaped rooftop, is nothing short of an architectural marvel. At least, that’s how some news reports put it when the store opened back in October. Beyond standing out among the less inspired buildings of the downtown Chicago area, the new Apple Store also happens to be very poorly thought through considering its thin roof now has dangerous icicles hanging perilously over public walkways.

  • 'Steve Jobs' is an Italian company — and Apple can't do anything about it

    After years of legal battles, a pair of brothers — Vincenzo and Giacomo Barbato — have successfully managed to win a legal battle against Apple, earning the right to call their company “Steve Jobs,” after Apple’s iconic founder, according to la Repubblica Napoli.

    The fight began back in in 2012, when the two brothers noticed that Apple had never trademarked Jobs’ name. The pair were already in the process of starting their own clothing and accessory company, after spending years creating products for other brands, and decided that “Steve Jobs” would be the perfect name for their new brand.

  • Filmmakers Want The Right to Break DRM and Rip Blu-Rays

     

    Breaking DRM or ripping Blu-Rays discs is a crime In the United States. While there are fair use exemptions, these don't apply to the public at large. Interestingly, filmmakers themselves are now urging the Copyright Office to lift some of the current restrictions, so that they can make the films they want.  

  • Swing Trading Earnings Bullish Momentum With Options in Red Hat Inc
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) stock moved positive 10.53% during past three month session
  • Pre-Market Technical Scan on Application Software Equities -- CDK Global, Workday, Red Hat, and Oracle
  • Best stock that multiplies your investments: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
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Mentor Embedded Linux gains cloud-based IoT platform

Mentor announced a “Mentor Embedded IoT Framework” platform that builds on top of Mentor Embedded Linux with cloud-based IoT cloud services ranging from device authentication and provisioning to monitoring and diagnostics. Mentor’s Mentor Embedded IoT Framework (MEIF) extends its Yocto Project based Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) and Nucleus RTOS development platforms to provide cloud services for IoT device management. The platform mediates between these platforms and cloud service backends, including Amazon Web Services (AWS), Eclipse IoT, Microsoft Azure, and Siemens MindSphere. Read more

Bang & Olufsen’s RPi add-on brings digital life to old speakers

B&O and HiFiBerry have launched an open source, DIY “Beocreate 4” add-on for the Raspberry Pi that turns vintage speakers into digitally amplified, wireless-enabled smart speakers with the help of a 180-Watt 4-channel amplifier, a DSP, and a DAC. Bang & Olufsen has collaborated with HiFiBerry to create the open source, $189 Beocreate 4 channel amplifier kit. The 180 x 140 x 30mm DSP/DAC/amplifier board pairs with your BYO Raspberry Pi 3 with a goal of upcycling vintage passive speakers. Read more

Gemini PDA will ship with Android, but it also supports Debian, Ubuntu, Sailfish, and Postmarket OS (crowdfunding, work in progress)

The makers of the Gemini PDA plan to begin shipping the first units of their handheld computer to their crowdfunding campaign backers any day now. And while the folks at Planet Computer have been calling the Gemini PDA a dual OS device (with Android and Linux support) from the get go, it turns out the first units will actually just ship with Android. Read more

Red Hat: CO.LAB, Kubernetes/OpenShift, Self-Serving 'Study' and More