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LinHES R8.2 Released

Filed under
GNU
Linux

The LinHES Dev team is pleased to announce the release of LinHES R8.2!

LinHES R8.2 brings updates to the kernel, system libraries, Service Menu options, MythTV 0.27.4, LinHES theme and many other parts of LinHES.

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Introducing the Canonical Distribution of Ubuntu OpenStack – your “autopilot” for rapid, customised OpenStack private cloud deployment and management

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

Based on Canonical’s industry-leading OpenStack reference architecture and building on Ubuntu’s leading position as the most widely used OpenStack platform, the Canonical Distribution gives users the widest range of commercially-supported vendor options for storage, software-defined networking and hypervisor from Canonical and its OpenStack partners. It then automates the creation and management of a reference OpenStack based on those choices.

“The Canonical Distribution of Ubuntu OpenStack is a complete autopilot for your private cloud,” said Mark Shuttleworth. “Point it at a rack or ten and tell it your preferences for storage, software defined network, and hypervisor, and it will create your cloud automatically, manage and monitor it for you, keep it fully secure, and update it to the next version of OpenStack in due course. This is the solution for people who want a high-performance reference cloud and want to focus on their own applications and workloads rather than the underlying infrastructure.”

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Boot to open source desktops with Linux on USB sticks

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Want to try a new OS sans commitment? Linux on USB sticks can be the first step to replacing Windows XP with an open source desktop such as Xubuntu.

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Synaptic Vs. Update Manager in Linux Mint

Filed under
GNU
Linux

“Windows assumes you are an idiot…Linux demands proof.”

In other words, for the most part, Linux users are in complete control of everything in/on their system. Linux will allow you to completely bugger your installation, because as a user you have the responsibility to know what you are doing. Fools are not suffered gladly when using Linux. You wanna play with the rm command? Go ahead…it’s your computer.

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The Companies That Support Linux: Altera

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Interviews

Contributing upstream to the Linux kernel is hugely important to Altera, says Findlay Shearer, a senior manager of product marketing at the Silicon Valley-based chip maker.

Altera's kernel code helps ensure Linux developers can work on their SoCFPGA architecture, which integrates FPGA (field programmable gate array) devices with ARM processors into a single SoC (system-on-chip). This enables innovation in the embedded industry, based on Altera's SoCFPGA chips.

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Makulu Cinnamon Debian Edition: A distribution you could use for serious work

Filed under
Linux
Debian

First out of the blocks of the pre-release distributions I looked at last week, is Makulu Linux Cinnamin Debian Edition.

This release is based on Debian Testing (jessie), with Cinnamon 2.2 for the desktop. There seems to have been a change in philosophy with this release, though: rather than the 'toss it all in there' approach, where it is just overflowing with just about every package and application possible, this release has taken the 'include the most commonly added/needed packages' angle.

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Dell, Asustek and Lenovo eye Chromebook market

Filed under
Linux
Google

Seeing that Chromebooks are enjoying demand from the education sector, brand vendors such as Dell, Asustek Computer and Lenovo have started becoming aggressive about the market, while Acer, Hewlett-Packard (HP) and Samsung Electronics will also launch new products to defend their market shares, according to sources from the upstream supply chain.

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Linux computer program brings a smile where it's least expected

Filed under
GNU
Linux

Using Linux as the operating system has not been a matter of religion or partisanship. Not even a matter of personal choice. It's a matter of pragmatic necessity. To give you a better picture of why, here's the story of Ricky.

In short: We installed a computer for a financially-disadvantaged kid. We taught that kid how to use the computer. That kid was supremely happy with his new Linux computer. We left. The end.

First, we started with Windows XP, then we moved to nothing but Linux because Microsoft refused to sell us licenses that were cheap enough to make our organization viable. Also, in less than a week of uses Windows, we were flooded with calls from parents complaining about viruses and malware. At that time, we were placing six computers in homes per week, so the complaints were a logistics nightmare for us.

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Three Outstanding Music Streaming Clients for Linux

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Linux

That’s right, Linux can get that music stream to your desktop in many ways. If you’re a lover of Spotify, Pandora, Last.fm, SoundCloud...you name it, there’s a way to stream that music. But don’t think you’re limited to using a web browser. Linux has clients, and plenty of them.

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Windows, Linux ARM servers are on their way to the data center

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Some people can't believe that Microsoft is working on a version of Windows Server for ARM processors. I only wonder what took the software giant so long.

True, when you think of ARM processors your mind immediately goes to smartphones and tablets, but 64-bit ARM processors can do far, far more than tweet your latest photo to your followers. Server hardware companies such as Dell and HP have been working on 64-bit ARM as a future data center platform for years.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME and Fedora

  • RFC: Integrating rsvg-rs into librsvg
    I have started an RFC to integrate rsvg-rs into librsvg. rsvg-rs is the Rust binding to librsvg. Like the gtk-rs bindings, it gets generated from a pre-built GIR file.
  • 1+ year of Fedora and GNOME hardware enablement
    A year and a couple of months ago, Christian Schaller asked me to pivot a little bit from working full time on Fleet Commander to manage a new team we were building to work on client hardware enablement for Fedora and GNOME with an emphasis on upstream. The idea was to fill the gap in the organization where nobody really owned the problem of bringing up new client hardware features vertically across the stack (from shell down to the kernel), or rather, ensure Fedora and GNOME both work great on modern laptops. Part of that deal was to take over the bootloader and start working closer to customers and hardware manufacturing parnters.
  • Fedora Atomic Workstation: Works on the beach
    My trip is getting really close, so I decided to upgrade my system to rawhide. Wait, what ? That is usually what everybody would tell you not to do. Rawhide has this reputation for frequent breakage, and who knows if my apps will work any given day. Not something you want to deal with while traveling.
  • 4 cool new projects to try in COPR for February

Why You Shouldn’t Use Firefox Forks (and Proprietary Opera)

  • Why You Shouldn’t Use Firefox Forks Like Waterfox, Pale Moon, or Basilisk
    Mozilla Firefox is an open source project, so anyone can take its code, modify it, and release a new browser. That’s what Waterfox, Pale Moon, and Basilisk are—alternative browsers based on the Firefox code. But we recommend against using any of them.
  • Opera Says Its Next Opera Release Will Have the Fastest Ad Blocker on the Block
    Opera Software promoted today its upcoming Opera 52 web browser to the beta channel claiming that it has the faster ad blocker on the market compared to previous Opera release and Google Chrome. One of the key highlights of the Opera 52 release will be the improved performance of the built-in ad blocker as Opera claims to have enhanced the string matching algorithm of the ad blocker to make it open web pages that contain ads much faster than before, and, apparently than other web browsers, such as Chrome.

Graphics: Glxinfo, ANV, SPIR-V

  • Glxinfo Gets Updated With OpenGL 4.6 Support, More vRAM Reporting
    The glxinfo utility is handy for Linux users in checking on their OpenGL driver in use by their system and related information. But it's not often that glxinfo itself gets updated, except that changed today with the release of mesa-demos-8.4.0 as the package providing this information utility. Mesa-demos is the collection of glxinfo, eglinfo, glxgears, and utilities related to Mesa. With the Mesa-demos 8.4.0 it is predominantly glxinfo updates.
  • Intel ANV Getting VK_KHR_16bit_storage Support Wrapped Up
    Igalia's Jose Maria Casanova Crespo sent out a set of patches today for fixes that allow for the enabling of the VK_KHR_16bit_storage extension within Intel's ANV Vulkan driver. The patches are here for those interested in 16-bit storage support in Vulkan. This flips on the features for storageBuffer16BitAccess, uniformAndStorageBuffer16BitAccess, storagePushConstant16 and the VK_KHR_16bit_storage extension. This support is present for Intel "Gen 8" Broadwell graphics and newer. Hopefully the work will be landing in Mesa Git soon.
  • SPIR-V Support For Gallium3D's Clover Is Closer To Reality
    It's been a busy past week for open-source GPU compute with Intel opening up their new NEO OpenCL stack, Karol Herbst at Red Hat posting the latest on Nouveau NIR support for SPIR-V compute, and now longtime Nouveau contributor Pierre Moreau has presented his latest for SPIR-V Clover support. Pierre has been spending about the past year adding SPIR-V support to Gallium3D's "Clover" OpenCL state tracker. SPIR-V, of course, is the intermediate representation used now by OpenCL and Vulkan.

Security: Updates, Tinder, FUD and KPTI Meltdown Mitigation

  • Security updates for Friday
  • Tinder vulnerability let hackers [sic] take over accounts with just a phone number

    The attack worked by exploiting two separate vulnerabilities: one in Tinder and another in Facebook’s Account Kit system, which Tinder uses to manage logins. The Account Kit vulnerability exposed users’ access tokens (also called an “aks” token), making them accessible through a simple API request with an associated phone number.

  • PSA: Improperly Secured Linux Servers Targeted with Chaos Backdoor [Ed: Drama queen once again (second time in a week almost) compares compromised GNU/Linux boxes to "back doors"]
    Hackers are using SSH brute-force attacks to take over Linux systems secured with weak passwords and are deploying a backdoor named Chaos. Attacks with this malware have been spotted since June, last year. They have been recently documented and broken down in a GoSecure report.
  • Another Potential Performance Optimization For KPTI Meltdown Mitigation
    Now that the dust is beginning to settle around the Meltdown and Spectre mitigation techniques on the major operating systems, in the weeks and months ahead we are likely to see more performance optimizations come to help offset the performance penalties incurred by mitigations like kernel page table isolation (KPTI) and Retpolines. This week a new patch series was published that may help with KPTI performance.