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Microsoft

Symple PC’s Gift to Reglue

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

The CIO had already released a memo to all tech support chiefs, stating that all retiring hardware should be placed on pallets for pick up by a soon-to-be-named reclamation and recycling vendor. The real kick? They’re paying big money to have their stuff picked up and parted out for profit — all in the name of “responsible recycling.” Rick quietly shared with me that the CIO was miffed because we were repurposing their donated computers with GNU/Linux. Because we were removing Windows, he thought the donated hardware was being wasted.

Being aware of this before I walked into the meeting gave me the satisfaction of knowing they would to lie to me in order to get me out the door. That was fine. I wasn’t going to release my inner cry baby over it. Where the hammer meets the nail, this was my fault anyway. I should have known better than to rely upon a single source for donations. Besides, no one is obliged to donate. Donations are to be accepted with grace and gratitude, and not to be expected as an entitlement. I wrote a letter to the firm, thanking them for their generous support over the past few years and wished them well. I want back to work and hoped I’d find a way to make up for the loss.

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Linux for Windows XP Holdouts

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

After all this time it still amazes me when I see Windows XP used among the public. Some of the most recent examples I've seen in 'the wild' have been with home users and some small businesses.

In this article, I'll look into what the attraction is to continue using Windows XP and which Linux distributions might make the best candidates for a switch.

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Dell's new computing appliance brings Windows apps to Chromebooks

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Google
Microsoft

After debuting its own Chromebook for education last year, Dell is turning its Chrome OS attention to offices. The company announced on Tuesday a new computing appliance to deliver Windows applications on Chromebooks.

In tandem with virtualization software, one Dell Appliance for Wyse - vWorkspace can serve up Windows apps to up to 350 Chromebooks or Chromeboxes. Dell says the cost starts at $180 per user for the server hardware and licenses, hypervisor and vWorkspace broker. The Chrome OS devices can also be managed or deployed through the new appliance.

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4 Ways to Install Ubuntu Linux on a Windows Computer

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

You want to install Ubuntu on your Windows computer, don’t you? The thing is, you’re not 100% certain, yet. What if it goes wrong?

Fortunately, there are many ways in which you can try Ubuntu Linux and see whether you really like it, from running a Live CD to installing the OS in a virtual machine, before going all the way and installing it alongside Windows to dual boot.

You might even abandon Windows altogether, converting your device into a 100% Ubuntu computer!

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Also: Windows 10 for Phones May Lose Smartphone-PC Convergence Race To Ubuntu

Ubuntu may beat Windows 10 to phone-PC convergence after all

Filed under
Microsoft
Ubuntu

Despite the recent announcement that Windows 10 phones will be able to be used as PCs when connected to an external monitor, Ubuntu—the first operating system to toy with the idea—hasn’t conceded the smartphone-PC convergence race to Microsoft just yet.

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Also: Windows 10 or Ubuntu: Which will be the one OS to rule them all?

Microsoft's new secure boot strategy will suit Linux firms

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

Linux companies Red Hat, SUSE and Canonical will benefit from the decision by Microsoft to suggest that OEMs not provide a means of turning off secure boot on PCs running Windows 10.

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Linux vs Windows: What do people want from their next computer?

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Microsoft

The Gnome desktop version can also be made to look stunning too, so users shouldn’t think that choosing Linux will make things ugly or clunky, as this is not the case.

In conclusion, Windows adding a Start button, which the company axed two years ago, and multiple desktops (a long established Linux feature) will not make the transition and subsequent day-to-day usage much less frustrating than the Windows 8 experience.

However, one of the main downsides about the Linux operating system is that by being free, this means that there is no huge marketing budget to get the message out.

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Microsoft & Education: The Song Remains the Same

Filed under
Microsoft

One of our hardware donors emailed me and asked if I would come to Austin and pick up a dozen Optiplex 745s with 17 inch monitors and accompanying keyboards. These Dells already had scrubbed drives and had either 4 or 8 GB of RAM, depending on what they were originally assigned to do. I said I most certainly would and arranged a time to be there. This donor has been especially generous to us, and not with just decent hardware. They also present us an annual Christmas cash donation of $1000. On the years they do employee matching, it is more than that — a lot more.

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M$’s Client Division Sinks Slowly Into The West

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Microsoft

As expected, M$’s client division is doing poorly.

The drop was huge, though, meaning they’ve been diversifying sufficiently rapidly just to keep some growth on the bottom line. One wonders how bad it would have been if not for support from Android/Linux…

See? There’s a reason this is The Year Of GNU/Linux on the Desktop. That other OS has dropped out.

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Intel Compute Stick now available: $149 for Windows version, $110 for Linux

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

The concept of a "PC stick" -- a processor and RAM embedded into a gum-pack-sized device that can connect to your HDTV via an HDMI connection -- is nothing new, but when a company like Intel embraces the concept, a lot more people start paying attention.

That was the case at CES back in January, when Intel showed off the Compute Stick, its version of a teeny-tiny PC that includes a quad-core Atom processor and -- depending on whether you want the Windows 8.1 or Linux edition -- comes with up to 2GB of RAM and up to 32GB of onboard storage. All of this fits onto something with dimensions of just 4.1x1.5x0.5 inches.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux and Graphics

  • ContainerCon Vendors Offer Flexible Solutions for Managing All Your New Micro-VMs
    As you might expect, this week's LinuxCon and ContainerCon 2016, held in Toronto, is heavy on the benefits and pitfalls of deploying containers, but several vendors aim to come to the rescue with flexible tools to manage it all. Take Datadog, a New York-based company that offers scalable monitoring of your containerized infrastructure—and just about everything else—from a single interface. This is an off-premise, cloud-based tool that can monitor tens of thousands of your hosts and integrate with stuff you already know, like AWS, Cassandra, Docker, Kubernetes, Postgre and 150 other tools.
  • Happy Birthday Linux
    Linux turns 25 today. That's four years older than Linus was when he invented it. That means Linus has spent more of his life with Linux than he did without it
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.9 To Bring Virtual Display Support, Improved GPU Reset
    The first pull request has been submitted of new Radeon and AMDGPU DRM driver updates to be queued in DRM-Next for landing with the Linux 4.9 kernel. To look forward to Linux 4.9 even though Linux 4.8 is still weeks from being released is PowerPlay support for Iceland GPUs, improved GPU reset, UVD and VCE power-gating for Carrizo and Stoney, support for pre-initialized vRAM buffers, TTM clean-ups, virtual display support, and other low-level changes. Many bug fixes also present. The AMDGPU virtual display support is useful and we have been looking forward to it. GPU reset improvements are also welcome for better recovery when the GPU becomes hung. As is the case lately, most of these changes are focused around the newer AMDGPU DRM driver over the mature Radeon DRM code.
  • OpenGL ES 3.1 Comes For Intel Haswell On Mesa
    For those running Intel Haswell processors, hope is not lost in seeing new versions of OpenGL extensions with the Intel Mesa driver.

Security News

  • Wednesday's security updates
  • This Android botnet relies on Twitter for its commands
  • Android Security Flaw Exposes 1.4B Devices [Ed: Alternative headline is, "Android is very popular, it has billions of users. And yes, security ain’t perfect." When did the press ever publish a headline like, "Windows flaw leaves 2 billion PCs susceptible for remote takeover?" (happens a lot)]
  • Wildfire ransomware code cracked: Victims can now unlock encrypted files for free
    Victims of the Wildfire ransomware can get their encrypted files back without paying hackers for the privilege, after the No More Ransom initiative released a free decryption tool. No More Ransom runs a web portal that provides keys for unlocking files encrypted by various strains of ransomware, including Shade, Coinvault, Rannoh, Rakhn and, most recently, Wildfire. Aimed at helping ransomware victims retrieve their data, No More Ransom is a collaborative project between Europol, the Dutch National Police, Intel Security, and Kaspersky Lab. Wildfire victims are served with a ransom note demanding payment of 1.5 Bitcoins -- the cryptocurrency favored by cybercriminals -- in exchange for unlocking the encrypted files. However, cybersecurity researchers from McAfee Labs, part of Intel Security, point out that the hackers behind Wildfire are open to negotiation, often accepting 0.5 Bitcoins as a payment. Most victims of the ransomware are located in the Netherlands and Belgium, with the malicious software spread through phishing emails aimed at Dutch speakers. The email claims to be from a transport company and suggests that the target has missed a parcel delivery -- encouraging them to fill in a form to rearrange delivery for another date. It's this form which drops Wildfire ransomware onto the victim's system and locks it down.

today's howtos

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