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Microsoft

GNU/Linux Instead of Windows

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft
  • Review: The Dell XPS 13 Developer Edition laptop is nearly perfect

    I'm a portable man—I like laptops and tablets. It's been years since I've owned a desktop PC. Between frequent travel to tech conferences and my predilection for doing my work done from the comforts of donut and coffee shops, I just can't be tethered to a desk.

    That means I ask a lot of my mobile gear. I need them to perform with desktop power. Compile code, edit video, play games—they need to do it all. And do it well.

  • Denver PC maker brings sandbox to life with augmented reality

    A downtown Denver computer company has boxed up a bit of spring’s rainy weather. Not a virtual box. It’s a real one. And it’s filled with 200 pounds of white sand — and virtual rain.

    System 76 CEO Carl Richell played with the sandbox at the company’s office Tuesday. He built a mound and, using augmented reality, turned it into an island with a mountain range. When he hovered his hands above the sand, the virtual rain poured down, streaming off the mountain peaks to the lowest point.

    He mixed and mashed the sand again. The scene changed instantly, thanks to an overhead projector, a motion sensor and a Linux laptop that overlaid the image on the sand.

    “It’s measuring what the fluid is doing at all times. And if you have lots and lots of fluid inside the box, you have a lot of calculations going on,” Richell said. ” … The idea is to inspire, to get people to think about what you can do with a computer.”

  • Linux vs. Windows device driver model: architecture, APIs and build environment comparison

    The first step in driver development is to understand the differences in the way each operating system handles its drivers, underlying driver model and architecture it uses, as well as available development tools. For example, Linux driver model is very different from the Windows one. While Windows facilitates separation of the driver development and OS development and combines drivers and OS via a set of ABI calls, Linux device driver development does not rely on any stable ABI or API, with the driver code instead being incorporated into the kernel. Each of these models has its own set of advantages and drawbacks, but it is important to know them all if you want to provide a comprehensive support for your device.

    In this article we will compare Windows and Linux device drivers and explore the differences in terms of their architecture, APIs, build development, and distribution, in hopes of providing you with an insight on how to start writing device drivers for each of these operating systems.

Linux and Windows

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Microsoft and its Agenda

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Microsoft
OSS

11 Reason Why To Migrate From Windows Desktop To Linux Desktop

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

We have always felt that Windows is one of the most user-friendly interfaces among the Operation Systems that have been developed and upgraded in this technological era. However, this has become a myth with the release of the Linux Desktops as they have proved to be more user-friendly and safe compared to that of the Windows Desktops.

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Also: Microsoft half-bricks Asus Windows 7 PCs with UEFI boot glitch

Why It’s The Best Time To Learn Linux And Open Source Programming — Tons Of New Jobs

Windows Desktop 'Fun'

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Microsoft

Jenkins Embrace and Extend?

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Microsoft
OSS

Six free open source alternatives to Windows 10: Chrome, Ubuntu, Solus and more, what's the best alternative to Windows OS?

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GNU
Linux
Microsoft

Windows 10 has generally be viewed as a welcome successor to Windows 8, both by businesses and individuals. However it has also come under scrutiny from users that are concerned about data privacy. So why not opt for a free Windows 10 alternative?

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Windows on TV

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Microsoft
  • Microsoft's Windows 10 nagware storms live TV weather forecast

    Microsoft's relentless Windows 10 nagware has interrupted a live TV weather forecast, urging meteorologist Metinka Slater to upgrade.

    The operating system suddenly popped up a box on screen insisting the station's computer be upgraded to the latest version – while Slater was on air describing thunderstorms rolling through Iowa, US.

  • The Best Windows 10 Commercial Ever

    We interrupt this weather report with a very important announcement. Despite our best efforts, your local TV station has not yet upgraded to Windows 10. We warned them that something like this was bound to happen sooner or later.

Should Microsoft acquire Canonical for its open source ambitions?

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Microsoft
Ubuntu
  • Should Microsoft acquire Canonical for its open source ambitions?

    Both companies also worked together to bring Bash to Windows 10, something developers have come to love since it was released. It is clear that Canonical is Microsoft’s strongest partner in the open source community, but unfortunately we can’t imagine an acquisition even taking place.

  • Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT) Embraces Canonical on its Open Source Strategy [Ed: worrisome]

    For so long now, the battle has been Microsoft Corporation (NASDAQ:MSFT) against anything but not Microsoft. Microsoft has had the upper hand with now near sign of it being toppled. The scenarios are however taking a twist. In an industry that once fiercely pounced on Linux, it is not mending ends to make it a key part of a long-term strategy. Microsoft is embracing open source, eliminating the line between the two ends.

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Security Tips for Installing Linux on Your SysAdmin Workstation
    Once you’ve chosen a Linux distro that meets all the security guidelines set out in our last article, you’ll need to install the distro on your workstation.
  • Fedora 26 crypto policy Test Day today (2017-03-30)!
  • Open-source developers targeted in sophisticated malware attack
    For the past few months, developers who publish their code on GitHub have been targeted in an attack campaign that uses a little-known but potent cyberespionage malware. The attacks started in January and consisted of malicious emails specifically crafted to attract the attention of developers, such as requests for help with development projects and offers of payment for custom programming jobs. The emails had .gz attachments that contained Word documents with malicious macro code attached. If allowed to execute, the macro code executed a PowerShell script that reached out to a remote server and downloaded a malware program known as Dimnie.
  • A scramble at Cisco exposes uncomfortable truths about U.S. cyber defense
    When WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange disclosed earlier this month that his anti-secrecy group had obtained CIA tools for hacking into technology products made by U.S. companies, security engineers at Cisco Systems (CSCO.O) swung into action. The Wikileaks documents described how the Central Intelligence Agency had learned more than a year ago how to exploit flaws in Cisco's widely used Internet switches, which direct electronic traffic, to enable eavesdropping. Senior Cisco managers immediately reassigned staff from other projects to figure out how the CIA hacking tricks worked, so they could help customers patch their systems and prevent criminal hackers or spies from using the same methods, three employees told Reuters on condition of anonymity.
  • NTPsec: a Secure, Hardened NTP Implementation
    Network time synchronization—aligning your computer's clock to the same Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) that everyone else is using—is both necessary and a hard problem. Many internet protocols rely on being able to exchange UTC timestamps accurate to small tolerances, but the clock crystal in your computer drifts (its frequency varies by temperature), so it needs occasional adjustments. That's where life gets complicated. Sure, you can get another computer to tell you what time it thinks it is, but if you don't know how long that packet took to get to you, the report isn't very useful. On top of that, its clock might be broken—or lying. To get anywhere, you need to exchange packets with several computers that allow you to compare your notion of UTC with theirs, estimate network delays, apply statistical cluster analysis to the resulting inputs to get a plausible approximation of real UTC, and then adjust your local clock to it. Generally speaking, you can get sustained accuracy to on the close order of 10 milliseconds this way, although asymmetrical routing delays can make it much worse if you're in a bad neighborhood of the internet.
  • Zelda Coatings
    I assume that every permutation of scams will eventually be tried; it is interesting that the initial ones preyed on people's avarice and dishonesty: "I will transfer millions to your bank account, then you share with me" - with subsequent scams appealing to another demographic: "I want to donate a large sum to your religious charity" - to perhaps capture a more virtuous but still credulous lot. Where will it end ?

Tizen and Android

Linux and Linux Foundation

Mesa and Intel Graphics