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Hardware

Hacker-friendly karaoke PMP runs Linux

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Hardware

linuxdevices.com: A Taiwanese electronic system design company has developed an open-source MP3, video, and Karaoke player that runs Linux 2.6.x. Cool-Idea Technology's Cool-Karaoke uses a 400MHz ARM920t processor, includes 4GB of flash and a 320x240 display, and supports customization with a freely downloadable toolchain and source code.

First Linux on Everest

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Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Linux thin client specialist Igel has created a Linux operating system image for a rugged panel PC designed for vehicle-mounted and industrial applications. The Igel-5310 LX Premium Image works with Glacier's Everest PC, available with a 600 MHz Celeron or 1.4GHz Pentium M processor.

Advent & Ubuntu, A Perfect Partnership?

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Linux
Hardware

kd-signofthetimes.blogspot: I recently purchased an Advent 4211 from PC World. I have no interest in Win-doh's being an Ubuntu convert so my first task would be to install Ubuntu 8.04.1 LTS Hardy Heron.

Ubuntu Linux Netbooks: What Dell Can Learn From ZaReason

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Hardware
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: Dell’s new sub-notebook, the Inspiron Mini 9 Netbook, is the latest vote of confidence for Ubuntu Linux in the desktop and mobile markets. I’m genuinely impressed with Dell’s commitment to Ubuntu. But Dell can learn two key lessons from ZaReason, a small PC maker that specializes in Ubuntu systems.

Dell Inspiron Mini 9 (Linux)

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Linux
Hardware

laptopmag.com: Dell barges into the netbook market with its sleek, configurable, and solid performing Inspiron Mini 9, but it’s not without flaws.

My first Linux laptop is the Asus EeePC netbook

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Linux
Hardware

Dana Blankenhorn: My first Linux laptop is the ASUS EeePC. This is a sweet machine in many ways. But if you’re a touch typist this is going to hurt.

Asus and MSI head to head

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Linux
Hardware

So what we have for this subjective head-to-head is a Win XP-based MSI Wind and a Linux-based eeePC 1000, both sporting 1GB of RAM. The different platforms mean that we could not a perform a true 'apples with apples' comparison, though the fact that both machines are essentially the same.

Also: HP 2133 Mini-Note PC Video Review

Dell Inspiron Mini 9 Available Now

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Linux
Hardware

gizmodo.com: Inside is an Intel Atom Diamondville processor and it has a 1024x600 LED-backlit screen with 4, 8 and 16GB SSD options and about three hours of battery life. Only the Windows XP version is available now for $399, in black or white—the $349 Ubuntu flavor, along with the rest of the six-color rainbow are a few weeks away.

ZaReason (and Other Independents) Outshine the Big Boys

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Linux
Hardware

blog.linuxtoday: Dell, ASUS, Acer, and all the other bandwagoning coattail riders are getting all the headlines for selling desktop Linux preinstalls, especially on this new netbook wave. But let's not forget that these bandwagoning coattail-riding party-crashers are very late to the party.

Dell's Ubuntu-powered mini-laptop arrives tomorrow

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Hardware
Ubuntu

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: Sources tell me, OK friends actually, that tomorrow, September 4th, is the long-awaited day that Dell will announce the release of its Inspiron 910 mini-laptop. It will come with your choice of (Boo!) Windows XP Home SP3 or (Yea!) Ubuntu 8.04.

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Edubuntu Vs UberStudent: Return To College With The Best Linux Distro

Importantly, there are a handful of programs that are on Edubuntu that UberStudent doesn’t have, such as KAlgebra, Kazium, KGeography, and Marble. Instead, UberStudent has a smaller collection of applications but it does include some useful items when it comes to writing papers that Edubuntu does not have. So ultimately, Edubuntu includes more programs that are information-heavy, while UberStudent includes more tools that can aid students in their studies but doesn’t directly give them any sort of information. Read more

Zotac Nvidia Jetson TK1 review

The Jetson TK1, Nvidia’s first development board to be marketed at the general public, has taken a circuitous route to our shores. Unveiled at the company’s Graphics Technology Conference earlier this year, the board launched in the US at a headline-grabbing price of $192 but its international release was hampered by export regulations. Zotac, already an Nvidia partner for its graphics hardware, volunteered to sort things out and has partnered with Maplin to bring the board to the UK. In doing so, however, the price has become a little muddled. $192 – a clever dollar per GPU core – has become £199.99. Compared to Maplin’s other single-board computer, the sub-£30 Raspberry Pi, it’s a high-end item that could find itself priced out of the reach of the company’s usual customers. Read more

New Human Interface Guidelines for GNOME and GTK+

I’ve recently been hard at work on a new and updated version of the GNOME Human Interface Guidelines, and am pleased to announce that this will be ready for the upcoming 3.14 release. Over recent years, application design has evolved a huge amount. The web and native applications have become increasingly similar, and new design patterns have become the norm. During that period, those of us in the GNOME Design Team have worked with developers to expand the range of GTK+’s capabilities, and the result is a much more modern toolkit. Read more

Desktop Shmesktop, New Open Source Academy, and Your Own Steam Machine

Today in Linux news, Matt Asay asks if we can "please stop talking about the Linux desktop?" Camp Shelby Joint Forces Training Center will open a Linux certification academy in Mississippi next month. A new developmental release of Opera was announced and a new horror game has me rushing to Steam. This and more inside in tonight's Linux recap. Read more