Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Hardware

Linux Gadgets

Filed under
Hardware

blogs.fsfe.org: Linux gadgets. What’s not to like? vanRijn likes the Palm Pre, or would like it if it was available already. Me, I think my main desktop sync desire right now is my Nokia 6300 phone.

The MIPS Processor and the $150 Linux Netbook

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

oreilly.com: Last week I wrote about two different projections claiming that Linux will recapture 50% of the netbook market, either in three years or by next year. Compelling MIPS and ARM based systems are the reason.

Nettop goes Nano

Filed under
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: Shuttle has released a fanless mini-PC using Via's 1.0GHz Nano U1700 processor. The Shuttle XS29F is said to feature both VGA and DVI video outputs, up to 4GB of RAM, SATA 2 storage options, four USB ports, and total power consumption of less than 50 Watts.

Here comes summer's first Linux netbook

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

computerworld.com: Reports of the Linux netbook's death at the hands of Microsoft have been greatly exaggerated. A flood of Linux netbook news will be made next week at the Computex trade show in Taiwan.

Reviewed: Yoggie Open Firewall SOHO

Filed under
Hardware

tuxradar.com: Here's a device that started out as a firewall and ended up as a powerful embedded development platform. It's based around an ARM CPU and includes an SDK to let you develop your own tools.

Review: System76 Pangolin Performance laptop

Filed under
Hardware

ghacks.net: If you had the chance to try one of the Wal Mart or Zonbu machines you will remember well that the hardware was second-rate at best. On top of that, the hardware BARELY supported Linux. But System 76 to make good on all of the promises these companies have failed to deliver on.

AMD Phenom II X3 On Linux

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: With the Phenom II series there is the X3 and X4 line-up for triple-core and quad-core processors, respectively. In this article we are looking at how well the AMD Phenom II X3 710 performs under Ubuntu Linux.

Wii Fit board speaks to Linux

Filed under
Hardware

ostatic.com: One of the best things about technology and its innate hackability (intentional or otherwise) is the endless variety of seemingly mismatched hardware and software that end up working (logically, even) once a hack is finished.

Why You Want a Dell Mini 10v and not a Dell Mini 10

Filed under
Hardware

blog.ibeentoubuntu: Well, the Dell Mini 10v just came out, and it's cheaper. That's one reason to get it right there.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

New Emojis Come, Celtx Goes Away

Development News

Security Leftovers

  • How To Improve The Linux System’s Security Using Firejail
    As you already know, Linux kernel is secure by default. But, it doesn’t mean that the softwares on the Linux system are completely secure. Say for example, there is a possibility that any add-ons on your web browser may cause some serious security issues. While doing financial transactions over internet, some key logger may be active in browser which you are not aware of. Even though, we can’t completely give the bullet-proof security to our Linux box, we still can add an extra pinch of security using an application called Firejail. It is a security utility which can sandbox any such application and let it to run in a controlled environment. To put this simply, Firejail is a SUID (Set owner User ID up on execution) program that reduces the risk of security breaches by restricting the running environment of untrusted applications.
  • “Httpd and Relayd Mastery” off to copyedit
  • Kalyna Block Cipher

Containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs

  • Setting the Record Straight: containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs
    I’m tired of having the same conversation over and over again with people so I figured I would put it into a blog post. Many people ask me if I have tried or what I think of Solaris Zones / BSD Jails. The answer is simply: I have tried them and I definitely like them. The conversation then heads towards them telling me how Zones and Jails are far superior to containers and that I should basically just give up with Linux containers and use VMs. Which to be honest is a bit forward to someone who has spent a large portion of her career working with containers and trying to make containers more secure. Here is what I tell them:
  • [Old] Hadoop Has Failed Us, Tech Experts Say

    The Hadoop community has so far failed to account for the poor performance and high complexity of Hadoop, Johnson says. “The Hadoop ecosystem is still basically in the hands of a small number of experts,” he says. “If you have that power and you’ve learned know how to use these tools and you’re programmer, then this thing is super powerful. But there aren’t a lot of those people. I’ve read all these things how we need another million data scientists in the world, which I think means our tools aren’t very good.”