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Graphics/Benchmarks

Kernel and Graphics: PDS, VKMS and Nouveau

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • PDS 0.98s release

    PDS 0.98s is released with the following changes

    1. Fix compilation issue on raspberry pi.
    2. Minor rework and optimization on balance code path.
    3. Fix wrong nr_max_tries in migrate_pending_tasks.

    This is mainly a bug fix and minor optimization release for 4.17. The rework of balance code doesn't go well, it actually make more overhead than current implement. Another rework which based on current implement is still on going, hopefully be included in next release.

  • PDS-MQ CPU Scheduler Revised For The Linux 4.17 Kernel With Minor Optimizations

    Alfred Chen announced this week the release of PDS-mq 0.98s, his latest patch-set of this CPU scheduler against the Linux 4.17 upstream code-base and includes minor optimization work and bug fixes.

    The PDS scheduler stands for the "Priority and Deadline based Skiplist multiple queue scheduler" that is derived from Con Kolivas' former BFS scheduler with Variable Run Queue (VRQ) support. PDS design principles are to be a simple CPU process scheduler yet efficient and scalable. PDS-mq differs from Con Kolivas' current MuQSS scheduler.

  • Add infrastructure for Vblank and page flip events in vkms simulated by hrtimer

    Since the beginning of May 2018, I have been diving into the DRM subsystem. In the beginning, nothing made sense to me, and I had to fight hard to understand how things work. Fortunately, I was not alone, and I had great support from Gustavo Padovan, Daniel Vetter, Haneen Mohammed, and the entire community. Recently, I finally delivered a new feature for VKMS: the infrastructure for Vblank and page flip events.

    At this moment, VKMS have regular Vblank events simulated through hrtimers (see drm-misc-next), which is a feature required by VKMS to mimic real hardware [6]. The development approach was entirely driven by the tests provided by IGT, more specifically the kms_flip. I modified IGT to read a module name via command line and force the use of it, instead of using only the modules defined in the code (patch submitted to IGT, see [1]). With this modification in the IGT, my development process to add a Vblank infrastructure to VKMS had three main steps as Figure 1 describes.

  • The State Of The VKMS Driver, Preparations For vBlank & Page Flip Events

    One of the exciting additions to look forward to with the upcoming Linux 4.19 kernel cycle is the virtual "VKMS" kernel mode-setting driver. The driver is still a work-in-progress, but multiple developers are working on it.

  • NIR Continues To Be Prepped For OpenCL Support

    Longtime Nouveau contributor Karol Herbst who joined Red Hat several months ago has been working on Nouveau NIR support as stepping towards SPIR-V/compute support and this summer the work very much remains an active target.

  • Nouveau Gallium3D Moves Closer Towards OpenGL 4.5 Compliance

    While the RadeonSI and Intel i965 Mesa drivers have been at OpenGL 4.5 compliance for a while now, the Nouveau "NVC0" Gallium3D driver has been bound to OpenGL 4.3 officially.

    This Nouveau Gallium3D driver for NVIDIA "Fermi" graphics hardware and newer has effectively supported all of the OpenGL 4.4/4.5 extensions, but not officially. Originally the NVC0 problem for OpenGL 4.4 and newer was the requirement of passing the OpenGL Conformance Test Suite (CTS), which at first wasn't open-source. But now The Khronos Group has made it available to everyone as open-source. Additionally, the proper legal wrangling is in place so the Nouveau driver could become a conforming Khronos adopter under the X.Org Foundation without any associated costs/fees with Nouveau being purely open-source and primarily considered a community driver.

Comparing Latencies and Power consumption with various CPU schedulers

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Ubuntu

The low-latency kernel offering with Ubuntu provides a kernel tuned for low-latency environments using low-latency kernel configuration options. The x86 kernels by default run with the Intel-Pstate CPU scheduler set to run with the powersave scaling governor biased towards power efficiency.

While power efficiency is fine for most use-cases, it can introduce latencies due to the fact that the CPU can be running at a low frequency to save power and also switching from a deep C state when idle to a higher C state when servicing an event can also increase on latencies.

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Vulkan vs. OpenGL Performance For Linux Games

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Gaming

It has been a while since last publishing some Linux GPU driver benchmarks focused explicitly on the OpenGL vs. Vulkan performance, but that changed today with a fresh look at the performance between these two Khronos graphics APIs when tested with AMD and NVIDIA hardware on the latest RadeonSI/RADV and NVIDIA Linux graphics drivers.

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AMD Graphics: AMDKFD, AMDGPU

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Hardware
  • Raven Ridge Support Posted For AMDKFD Compute Driver

    Felix Kuehling of AMD sent out the remaining six patches for getting the AMD Raven Ridge (Ryzen APUs) working with the AMDKFD kernel compute driver so that the ROCm/OpenCL user-space compute stack can be run on these new APUs.

  • Radeon RX Vega Display Regression Fix Heading To Linux 4.18 Git

    If you have been part of the group of Radeon RX Vega Linux users trying out Linux 4.18 and finding your display no longer lights up, heading to Linux 4.18 Git should be a fix for at least some of the users.

    Sent out on Friday was a batch of AMDGPU DRM-Fixes-4.18. It's just three fixes, but two of them are pertaining to display problems and the other a segmentation fault if the GPU does not power up properly when resuming the system.

Graphics: Libinput, Mir, Wayland and Release of Mesa 18.1.4

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Libinput Gets Reworked Trackpoint Acceleration

    Peter Hutterer at Red Hat is trying again to get trackpoint acceleration performing nicely under the libinput library so trackpoints behave nicely across Wayland, X.Org, and Mir systems.

    Hutterer believes now that libinput's previous trackpoint acceleration code was "simply broken", but he believes this new code is on the right track and supports a wider configuration range.

  • libinput has a new trackpoint acceleration

    Just a heads-up, I just merged a branch that fixes trackpoint acceleration
    in libinput. The previous approach was simply broken, the new one is quite
    similar to what we had before anyway - calculating speed from the deltas and
    applying the acceleration curve from that. The curve is adjusted for
    trackpoints with a relatively wide configurable range.

  • Mir 0.32.1 Released With Launcher For Internal Wayland Clients, Fixes

    Canonical developers working on Mir have prepared the release of Mir 0.32.1 with a few fixes and improvements off the recent release of Mir 0.32.

    The Mir abstraction library (libmiral) now has a launcher for internal Wayland clients and the MirAL shell has reinstated the "spinner" in Wayland for when starting the shell. There are also several bug fixes pertaining to Mir's Wayland and Mesa support in this point release.

  • Wayland 1.16 & Weston 5.0 Reach Alpha

    Samsung's Derek Foreman has announced the alpha release of Wayland 1.16 as well as the Weston 5.0 reference compositor.

    As is often the case with recent Wayland releases, they are not all that large. Wayland 1.16 Alpha does away with the deprecated wl_global definition, fixes various oddities, the Wayland code generator now supports foreign enums, and updated contribution documentation.

  • mesa 18.1.4

    Hi list,

    Mesa 18.1.4 is now available for download.

    In this release we have:
    - Several fixes for i965
    - Several fixes for anv
    - A few fixes each for radeonsi, glx, the glsl compiler, the autotools build,
    nir, st/dri, and r600

    Dylan

  • Mesa 18.1.4 Released With Fixes For Intel & Radeon Drivers

    For those abiding by Mesa stable releases, Mesa 18.1.4 is now available -- in time for updating prior to any weekend Linux gaming or other activities -- for these open-source OpenGL/Vulkan driver components.

    Mesa 18.1.4 truth be told isn't all that of an exciting release, unless you happened to be affected by any of the just over two dozen fixes incorporated into this timed point release.

Windows Server 2016 vs. FreeBSD 11.2 vs. 8 Linux Distributions Performance Benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Given the recent releases of FreeBSD 11.2, Scientific Linux 6.10, openSUSE Leap 15, and other distribution updates in the past quarter, here are some fresh benchmarks of eight different Linux distributions compared to FreeBSD 11.2 and Microsoft Windows Server 2016. The tested Linux platforms for this go-around were CentOS 7.5, Clear Linux 23610, Debian 9.4, Fedora Server 28, openSUSE leap 15.0, Scientific Linux 6.10, Scientific Linux 7.5, and Ubuntu 18.04 LTS.

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Linux Graphics: AMD and NVIDIA

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Vega 20 Support Added To RadeonSI Gallium3D Driver

    With the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel release due out in August there is the AMDGPU kernel driver support for Vega 20, the yet-to-be-released Vega GPU said to be the 7nm part launching later this year in Radeon Instinct products and featuring 32GB of HBM2 and adding some new deep learning instructions. Now the RadeonSI Gallium3D user-space driver for OpenGL within Mesa has Vega 20 support.

  • NVIDIA 396.24.10 Linux Driver Brings Vulkan 8-Bit / Renderpass2 / Conditional Render

    NVIDIA developers today released the 396.24.10 driver, their latest beta driver for Linux focused on the latest Vulkan innovations and improvements and is joined by the Windows 398.58 driver.

    The NVIDIA 396.24.10 Linux driver (and 398.58 beta for Windows) are focused on delivering the functionality added with the recent Vulkan 1.1.80 specification update.

Linux Graphics: AMD and NVIDIA

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Vega 20 Support Added To RadeonSI Gallium3D Driver

    With the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel release due out in August there is the AMDGPU kernel driver support for Vega 20, the yet-to-be-released Vega GPU said to be the 7nm part launching later this year in Radeon Instinct products and featuring 32GB of HBM2 and adding some new deep learning instructions. Now the RadeonSI Gallium3D user-space driver for OpenGL within Mesa has Vega 20 support.

  • NVIDIA 396.24.10 Linux Driver Brings Vulkan 8-Bit / Renderpass2 / Conditional Render

    NVIDIA developers today released the 396.24.10 driver, their latest beta driver for Linux focused on the latest Vulkan innovations and improvements and is joined by the Windows 398.58 driver.

    The NVIDIA 396.24.10 Linux driver (and 398.58 beta for Windows) are focused on delivering the functionality added with the recent Vulkan 1.1.80 specification update.

96-core NanoPi Fire3 cluster computer blows past RPi rigs in benchmarks

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Cluster computer projects are increasingly looking beyond the Raspberry Pi to build devices with faster cluster-friendly SBCs. Here’s a 96-core monster that taps the octa-core NanoPi Fire3.

Cluster computers constructed of Raspberry Pi SBCs have been around for years, ranging from supercomputer-like behemoths to simple hobbyist rigs. More recently, we’ve seen cluster designs that use other open-spec hacker boards, many of which offer higher computer power and faster networking at the same or lower price. Farther below, we’ll examine one recent open source design from Paul Smith at Climbers.net that combines 12 octa-core NanoPi-Fire3 SBCs for a 96-core cluster.

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Also: Low-profile Apollo Lake Mini-ITX board runs Linux

The NVIDIA/AMD Linux GPU Gaming Benchmarks & Performance-Per-Dollar For July 2018

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Graphics/Benchmarks

In part with GPU demand by crypto-currency miners waning a bit, NVIDIA GeForce and AMD Radeon graphics card availability at retailers has been improving in recent weeks as well as seeing less inflated prices than just recently had been the case. Given the better availability and stabilizing prices, here is a fresh look of the current line-up of GeForce and Radeon graphics cards under Ubuntu Linux using the newest AMD/NVIDIA drivers and also providing performance-per-dollar metrics given current retail prices.

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