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Graphics/Benchmarks

Intel Graphics Performance: Clear Linux vs. Xubuntu 16.04 LTS vs. Fedora 23 Xfce

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Graphics/Benchmarks

With recent benchmarks showing Intel's Clear Linux distribution even being faster for Intel HD Graphics performance compared to other more common distributions like Ubuntu 16.04, I decided to run some more tests and also test Fedora 23 Xfce into the mix.

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Phoronix on Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Phoronix on Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Ubuntu 16.04 vs. vs. Clear Linux vs. openSUSE vs. Scientific Linux 7

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Here are some extra Linux distribution benchmarks for your viewing pleasure this weekend.

Following the release of Ubuntu 16.04 LTS last week, I was running another fresh performance comparison of various Linux distributions on my powerful Xeon E3-1270 v5 Skylake system. I made it a few Linux distributions in before the motherboard faced an untimely death. Not sure of the cause yet, but the motherboard is kaput and thus the testing was ended prematurely.

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Linux and Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Phoronix on Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Mesa 11.3/12.0 Planned For Release In June

    Mesa release manager Emil Velikov has laid out plans to release the next version of Mesa in just over one month.

    This next Mesa release is currently known as Mesa 11.3, but could become Mesa 12.0 should core Mesa see the changes to make OpenGL 4.4 (outside of the hardware drivers).

    Emil is looking to have the Mesa 11.3/12.0 feature freeze on 20 May, which will be timed with the first release candidate. There would be the usual weekly Mesa RCs until the official release, which is currently scheduled to take place on 10 June.

  • Igalia Posts Intel vertex_attrib_64bit Mesa Driver Patches, Close To OpenGL 4.1+

    INTEL --
    While the Intel Mesa driver remains at OpenGL 3.3 due to missing FP64 support, that code continues to be worked on by Igalia and Intel's OTC developers. Patches for a related extension, ARB_vertex_attrib_64bit, have also now been published that will clear Intel's Mesa driver requirements for OpenGL 4.1.

    Antia Puentes of Igalia published the ARB_vertex_attrib_64bit patches this morning for Intel's Mesa driver and supports Broadwell (Gen 8) hardware and newer. She explained about the timing of the work, "As this work depends on the ARB_gpu_shader_fp64 i965 functionality, which is work in progress, the aim of sending the series now is to get early feedback and parallelise the review process."

  • New DRM Driver Set For Linux 4.7: ARC PGU

    David Airlie has pulled the ARC PGU DRM driver into his DRM-Next tree for in turn landing with the Linux 4.7 kernel.

    The ARC PGU DRM driver is for a simple display controller found on Synopsys development boards. The ARC PGU is an RGB streamer that reads from a frame-buffer and sends to a digital (HDMI) encoder. This ARC PGU hardware is found on Synopsys boards like the AXS101 and AXS103.

  • Missing Skylake HD/Iris Graphics Devices Get Added To Mesa DRM

    It turns out that Skylake's HD Graphics 510, HD Graphics 535, Iris Graphics 550, and Iris Graphics P555 were missing their open-source driver support from an important piece of the Linux graphics stack.

Kernel Space: Linux, Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • See How Your Linux GPU Compares To Various GeForce GPUs With NVIDIA 364.19

    While waiting for today's release of Tomb Raider on Linux, for which I just posted various NVIDIA Tomb Raider benchmarks on Ubuntu, I was running some other OpenGL benchmarks.

    One of the benchmark runs I did with various graphics cards this morning while waiting for Tomb Raider was the well known and demanding Unigine Valley demo. Tests were done with various Kepler and Maxwell GeForce graphics cards while using the brand new NVIDIA 364.19 driver on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS x86_64.

  • X.Org Foundation Election Results

    Two questions were up for voting, 4 seats on the Board of Directors and approval of the amended By-Laws to join SPI.

    Congratulations to our reelected and new board members Egbert Eich, Alex Deucher, Keith Packard and Bryce Harrington. Thanks a lot to Lucas Stach for running. And also big thanks to our outgoing board member Matt Dew, who stepped down for personal reasons.

  • X.Org Members Approve Becoming Part Of The SPI Organization

    The results just are in of the 2016 X.Org Foundation elections and the members have voted to become part of the SPI. The foundation thus is basically becoming dissolved to become part of Software in the Public Interest.

    After last year's vote failed for the X.Org Foundation to merge with the SPI due to not reaching the two-thirds quorum to change the by-laws, this year was a success: 61 of the 65 members voted.

Tomb Raider Benchmarks On Linux With NVIDIA Graphics

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Graphics/Benchmarks

With Feral Interactive releasing Tomb Raider for Linux, three years after the premiere of the Windows port, many have been wondering about the Linux performance particularly with regards to the graphics driver situation. Here are our initial benchmarks of Feral's port of Tomb Raider on Ubuntu Linux with using NVIDIA graphics. More tests to follow.

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Nvidia 364.19

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Nvidia 364.19 stable driver released, featuring Vulkan, Wayland & Mir support
  • Nvidia 364.19 Short-Lived Linux Driver Adds Vulkan 1.0 Support, Wayland Fixes

    Nvidia today, April 22, 2016, updated its short-lived Unix graphics driver to version 364.19 for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, FreeBSD, and Solaris operating systems.

    The Short-Lived branch of the Nvidia video driver usually gets the latest improvements and fixes, but it is not recommended to stable users because it changes too often and new releases are not thoroughly tested. Nvidia 364.19 is now the latest short-lived graphics driver, and it looks like it brings many interesting changes.

  • NVIDIA 364.19 Linux Driver Stabilizes The Wayland & Mir Support

    The NVIDIA 364.19 Linux graphics driver was released today as the first stable release in the NVIDIA 364 driver series.

    The NVIDIA 364 series is the huge update that has the necessary changes for supporting Wayland and Mir. This support comes via new EGL extensions, the nvidia-drm.ko kernel module that registers itself as a DRM driver with KMS support, and other work that has been building up for some time. NVIDIA 364 is also big for integrating the Vulkan graphics API support.

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora: The Latest

  • Fedora’s Love For Python Continues
    In this digital age, there is still some use for having messaging that is easy to distribute and consume. While it may seem quaint and old-fashioned, hard-copy content is a useful way to deliver information at events like conferences and meetups.
  • Fedora account system and FreeIPA
    Over the years, a number of times, people have asked us about migrating from our own custom Fedora Account System (FAS) to FreeIPA.
  • Testing FreeIPA in openQA
    openQA has some integration with Open vSwitch and it’s what the SUSE folks use, so I went with that. You basically have to create a tap device for each worker instance and use something like OVS to connect those devices together with a virtual bridge or whatever so the test VMs can communicate. The VMs also need to access the per-job web server that os-autoinst runs for the worker to upload logs to and download scripts to run from (in some cases), so in the reference set up you have that bind to the bridge interface and ensure the firewalling is set up so the VMs can reach it. And if you need the VMs to have access to the external network, as we do for FreeIPA testing (dnf and rolekit just do not want to work without access to the repositories), you have to basically set up NAT routing for the traffic from the VMs. It’s lots of network configuration fun!

Leftovers: Debian

  • The Pyra - handheld computer with Debian preinstalled
    The machine is a complete ARM-based PC with micro HDMI, SATA, USB plugs and many others connectors, and include a full keyboard and a 5" LCD touch screen. The 6000mAh battery is claimed to provide a whole day of battery life time, but I have not seen any independent tests confirming this. The vendor is still collecting preorders, and the last I heard last night was that 22 more orders were needed before production started.
  • New sources for contributors.debian.org
    Many people might not be aware of it, but since a couple of years ago, we have an excellent tool for tracking and recognising contributors to the Debian Project: Debian Contributors Debian is a big project, and there are many people working that do not have great visibility, specially if they are not DDs or DMs. We are all volunteers, so it is very important that everybody gets credited for their work. No matter how small or unimportant they might think their work is, we need to recognise it!
  • What's new since Jessie?
    Jessie was released one year ago now and the Java Team has been busy preparing the next release.

Leftovers: OSS

  • The New Kingmakers and the Next Step for Open Source
  • Puppet Rebrands, Launches Numerous New Projects
    Folks who are focused on container technology and virtual machines as they are implemented today might want to give a hat tip to some of the early technologies and platforms that arrived in the same arena. Among those, Puppet, which was built on the legacy of the venerable Cfengine system, was an early platform that helped automate lots of virtual machine implementations. We covered it in depth all the way back in 2008. Fast-forward to today, and Puppet Labs is changing its name to mark a new era, and is out with several new product initiatives. The organization, now known as just Puppet, has also named its first president and COO, Sanjay Mirchandani, who comes to the company from VMware, where he was a senior vice-president.
  • Tracing Microconference Accepted into 2016 Linux Plumbers Conference
    After taking a break in 2015, Tracing is back at Plumbers this year! Tracing is heavily used throughout the Linux ecosystem, and provides an essential method for extracting information about the underlying code that is running on the system. Although tracing is simple in concept, effective usage and implementation can be quite involved.
  • Jeremy Sands: Southern Fried College Football and Down-Home Linux
    This is a “Meet the Man Behind the Curtain” interview. It’s more about Sands than about either csnbbs.com or the LinuxFest he spends so much of his time organizing. But at the end of the interview, he talks about how the LinuxFest can always use more volunteers, even if all you can do is woman or man the registration desk for an hour. And sponsors? It’s a pretty healthy operation financially, but more sponsors are always welcome — especially ones from the Southeast, because this conference is proudly regional, not something identical to what you might find in, say, Los Angeles or Washington State.
  • A daughter of Silicon Valley shares her 'nerd' story
    In the end, I had to leave my job at ISC. Luckily, my work and my values brought me to Mozilla, where I've been both perseverant and lucky enough to have several meaningful roles. Today, I'm the senior program manager of diversity and inclusion. I work full-time on building a more diverse and inclusive Mozilla, standing on the shoulders of giants who did the same before me and in partnership with many of the smartest and kindest people I know. I've followed my passion for empowering people to find meaningful ways to contribute to the Internet I believe the world needs: an expansion of the one that excited me so long ago. And I get to see a lot of the world while I do it!
  • Waiting for Plugins: The Nylas N1 Email Client
    I wish the Nylas N1 team the best. I love that they took the time to build a Linux client. I love the idea of a hackable email client. But Nylas N1, as it stands now, is very limited. If you happen to like the defaults, you’re in for a treat. But if you’re looking for an email client that bends to your will and that you can easily customize as a non-developer, you’re probably better off with Thunderbird (especially now that people are thinking about its future). Thunderbird isn’t pretty—certainly not as pretty as Nylas N1—but it lets you build it into whatever email client you want it to be.
  • RightScale, Focused on the Cloud, Delivers Docker Container Management
  • Drupal developer on how to make your website more accessible
    For open source developer Mike Gifford, founder and president of OpenConcept Consulting Inc., any mention of Drupal accessibility after his name is redundant. He has spent the better part of 10 years improving and cementing accessibility in Drupal, enough to earn the role of official core accessibility maintainer for the project. Accessibility awareness has grown considerably in the Drupal community, but the Internet changes rapidly and the software needs to keep up to remain relevant. Recent press on the trend of decoupling Drupal—including the milestone post by project founder Dries Buytaert himself—tends to skirt the issue that so-called headless configurations can blot out accessibility functions designed for the theme layer.
  • DuckDuckGo Gives $225,000 to Open Source Projects
    It appears as if people have been using DuckDuckGo’s privacy centered search enough to make the company successful. Certainly not we-control-the-world successful like Google, but successful enough to give it some cash-on-hand breathing room. Also successful enough for the company to give back to the community by handing out $225,000 to some free and open source projects.
  • DuckDuckGo's 2016 open source donations
  • H2020 submission is rather 'anti-open'
    So what's the EC's current stand with forcing citizens to use Adobe's proprietary, closed technology and only Windows or Mac for submission of H2020 projects? With Adobe retiring Linux versions of Acrobat a couple of years ago (yes you can still download an obsolete version for Linux from Adobe's FTP but it won't work with ECAS "A forms"), this is a very "anti-open" situation.
  • It's Time to Open Source Moving Vehicles
    Open source software has made its mark on desktop computing, mobile phones, and the internet of things. But one area yet to be cracked wide open with freely distributed software is mobility: from autonomous cars, software-assisted driving, to connecting vehicles to other devices. On Wednesday, Arthur Taylor, chief technology officer at Advanced Telematic Systems, presented an open-source platform that he hopes will be the start of more innovation in software development for mobility technologies. But he also argued for the merits of open source software in a space pretty much dominated by the closed-off products of large corporates, such as Google and Uber.
  • Next Phase of Development Begins for The Hovalin, An Open Source 3D Printed Violin
    The Hovalin, developed by Matt and Kaitlyn Hova, is a open source 3D printed violin that has received much attention since the first version was released. Now the next phase of development has begun for the Hovalin 3.0, and Matt Hova has posted a blog entry and started a Reddit thread about the project that always keeps improving in a collaborative effort by many Hovalin fans. In the Hovalin website blog post, Hova explains what the most recent plans are for the latest version. First, version 3.0 will “move away from the current carbon fiber rectangle to an 8 mm rod.” Also, a lock will be created that will be used to keep the top and bottom pieces together. Custom brims to prevent warping will be added, as well as possible chin and shoulder rests. Finally, Hova wants to “work out a new system for distributing multiple options for the .stls including files with brim, files without brim, pre-sliced files with supports for the middle piece.” There are many changes in the works here, as you can see from just this list alone.

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