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Graphics/Benchmarks

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages

    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.

  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM

    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers.

    A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Graphics: RADV Vulkan vs. RadeonSI OpenGL, Open-Source OpenCL, VIA Graphics & Other Vintage GPUs

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • RADV Vulkan vs. RadeonSI OpenGL Performance With Linux 4.13 + Mesa 17.3-dev

    It's been a few weeks since last delivering any large RADV/RadeonSI open-source AMD Linux graphics benchmark results due to being busy with testing other hardware as well as battling some regressions / stability problems within the AMDGPU DRM code and Mesa Git. But with Linux 4.13 stable and the newest Mesa 17.3-dev code, things are playing well so here are some fresh OpenGL vs. Vulkan benchmarks on three Radeon graphics cards.

  • Open-Source OpenCL Adoption Is Sadly An Issue In 2017

    While most of the talks that take place at the annual X.Org Developers' Conference are around the exciting progress being made across the Linux graphics landscape, at XDC2017 taking place this week at Google, the open-source GPGPU / compute talk is rather the let down due to the less than desirable state of the open-source OpenCL ecosystem.

    Tom Stellard who formerly worked for AMD on their LLVM compiler stack and compute initiatives who recently joined Red Hat provided a "Current state of Open Source GPGPU" talk. It's not too much of a surprise if you are up-to-date in your daily Phoronix reading and our close coverage of all things Linux GPU. But if you're not a devoted reader or looking for an hour synopsis, check out his presentation embedded in this article.

  • VIA Graphics & Other Vintage GPUs Still Interest At Least One Developer In 2017

    Kevin Brace, the sole active developer left working on the OpenChrome driver stack for VIA x86 graphics, presented yesterday at XDC2017 about his work on this driver and how in the years to come he still hopes to work on other vintage GPU support.

    Brace's work mostly covered his personal motivations, a brief history of Via Unichrome and the Linux driver options, and then his recent work on trying to get the OpenChrome DDX and DRM drivers into shape.

LWN (Now Open Access): Kernel Configuration, Linux 4.14 Merge Window, Running Android on a Mainline Graphics Stack

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Android
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • A different approach to kernel configuration

    The kernel's configuration system can be challenging to deal with; Linus Torvalds recently called it "one of the worst parts of the whole project". Thus, anything that might help users with the process of configuring a kernel build would be welcome. A talk by Junghwan Kang at the 2017 Open-Source Summit demonstrated an interesting approach, even if it's not quite ready for prime time yet.

    Kang is working on a Debian-based, cloud-oriented distribution; he wanted to tweak the kernel configuration to minimize the size of the kernel and, especially, to reduce its attack surface by removing features that were not needed. The problem is that the kernel is huge, and there are a lot of features that are controlled by configuration options. There are over 300 feature groups and over 20,000 configuration options in current kernels. Many of these options have complicated dependencies between them, adding to the challenge of configuring them properly.

  • The first half of the 4.14 merge window

    September 8, 2017 As of this writing, just over 8,000 non-merge changesets have been pulled into the mainline kernel repository for the 4.14 development cycle. In other words, it looks like the pace is not slowing down for this cycle either. The merge window is not yet done, but quite a few significant changes have been merged so far. Read on for a summary of the most interesting changes entering the mainline in the first half of this merge window.

  • Running Android on a mainline graphics stack

    The Android system may be based on the Linux kernel, but its developers have famously gone their own way for many other parts of the system. That includes the graphics subsystem, which avoids user-space components like X or Wayland and has special (often binary-only) kernel drivers as well. But that picture may be about to change. As Robert Foss described in his Open Source Summit North America presentation, running Android on the mainline graphics subsystem is becoming possible and brings a number of potential benefits.
    He started the talk by addressing the question of why one might want to use mainline graphics with Android. The core of the answer was simple enough: we use open-source software because it's better, and running mainline graphics takes us toward a fully open system. With mainline graphics, there are no proprietary blobs to deal with. That, in turn, makes it easy to run current versions of the kernel and higher-level graphics software like Mesa.

Mesa 17.1.10 Release Candidate

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • Mesa 17.1.10 release candidate

    The candidate for the Mesa 17.1.10 is now available. Currently we have:
    - 41 queued
    - 0 nominated (outstanding)
    - and 5 rejected patches

    This is the last release for the 17.1 series.

  • Mesa 17.1.10 Is Being Prepped As The Final 17.1 Update

    J.A. Suarez Romero of Igalia is preparing Mesa 17.1.10 as the final point release for the Mesa 17.1 release stream.

    The release candidate is out today while Romero is planning to issue this final update to Mesa 17.1 by next week Monday, 25 September. Following that, users are encouraged to upgrade to the stable Mesa 17.2 series.

Graphics: NVIDIA Progress, VC4/VC5, Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa

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Graphics/Benchmarks
  • NVIDIA 384.90 Linux Driver Brings Fixes, Quadro P5200 Support

    One day after releasing updated GeForce Linux legacy drivers, NVIDIA is now out with an update to their long-lived 384 branch.

    The NVIDIA 384 Linux series is the current latest series for their proprietary driver. Coming out today is the 384.90 update that is primarily comprised of bug fixes but also includes Quadro P5200 support.

  • NVIDIA Continues Prepping The Linux Desktop Stack For HDR Display Support

    Besides working on the new Unix device memory allocator project, they have also been engaged with upstream open-source Linux developers over preparing the Linux desktop for HDR display support.

    Alex Goins of the NVIDIA Linux team presented on their HDR ambitions for the Linux desktop and the work they are still doing for prepping the X.Org stack for dealing with these next-generation computer displays. This is a project they have also been looking at for more than one year: NVIDIA Is Working Towards HDR Display Support For Linux, But The Desktop Isn't Ready.

  • The State Of The VC4 Driver Stack, Early Work On VC5

    ric Anholt of Broadcom just finished presenting at XDC2017 Mountain View on the state of the VC4 driver stack most notably used by the Raspberry Pi devices. Additionally, he also shared about his early work on the VC5 driver for next-generation Broadcom graphics.

  • Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa Have Hit Amazing Milestones This Year

    Kaveh Nasri, the manager of Intel's Mesa driver team within the Open-Source Technology Center since 2011, spoke this morning at XDC2017 about the accomplishments of his team and more broadly the Mesa community. Particularly over the past year there has been amazing milestones accomplished for this open-source driver stack.

GPUVis in the News

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Graphics/Benchmarks

Linux and Graphics: Linux Weather Forecast, DRM, XDC2017, Mesa, and NVIDIA

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linux Weather Forecast

    This page is an attempt to track ongoing developments in the Linux development community that have a good chance of appearing in a mainline kernel and/or major distributions sometime in the near future. Your "chief meteorologist" is Jonathan Corbet, Executive Editor at LWN.net. If you have suggestions on improving the forecast (and particularly if you have a project or patchset that you think should be tracked), please add your comments below.

  • A New DRM Driver Is Coming For Linux 4.15

    TVE200 is a new Direct Rendering Manager driver being queued for Linux 4.15.

    The TVE200 DRM driver is for the Faraday Tech TVE200 "TV encoder" block. This mini driver was written by Linus Walleij of Linaro.

  • XDC2017 Kicks Off With X.Org, Wayland & Graphics Talks

    The X.Org Developers Conference kicked off a short time ago at the Googleplex in Mountain View, CA. But even if you are not at the event, there is a livestream.

  • Mesa Sees An Initial Meson Build System Port

    A few months ago was a vibrant discussion about a Meson proposal for libdrm/Mesa while today the initial patches were posted in bringing a possible Meson build system port for Mesa.

  • NVIDIA Offers Update On Their Proposed Unix Device Memory Allocation Library

    James Jones of NVIDIA presented this morning at XDC2017 with their annual update on a new Unix device memory allocation library. As a reminder, this library originated from NVIDIA's concerns over the Generic Buffer Manager (GBM) currently used by Wayland compositors not being suitable for use with their driver's architecture and then the other driver developers not being interested in switching to EGLStreams, NVIDIA's original push for supporting Wayland.

  • NVIDIA Legacy Linux Drivers Updated With Newer Kernel Support

    NVIDIA has issued new releases of its two legacy drivers for Linux.

    The NVIDIA 340.104 driver is now available for older Tesla architecture graphics processors while the NVIDIA 304.137 is out for the GeForce 6 and GeForce 7 generations.

AMD Threadripper 1950X on Linux

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

Early Linux 4.14 Kernel Benchmarks Are Looking Promising

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

I've begun running some Linux 4.14-rc1 kernel benchmarks and in some areas there appears to be nice gains with this in-development kernel.

If you are behind on your Phoronix reading and don't know about all of the changes coming for this next kernel release -- which will also be an LTS kernel -- see our Linux 4.14 feature overview that was published this past weekend.

Here are just some very early benchmarks while more are on the way.

Read more

Kernel: Next Linux kernel 4.13 RC, the Linux Foundation and Graphics News

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Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux
  • Linus Torvalds Kicks Off Development of Linux Kernel 4.14, the Next LTS Release

    A day early than expected, Linux creator Linus Torvalds cautiously kicked off the development of the Linux 4.14 kernel series, which looks to be the next LTS (Long Term Support) branch, with the first Release Candidate (RC) milestone.

    That's right, two weeks after the release of Linux kernel 4.13, which is currently the most stable and advanced kernel series, being adopted by more and more GNU/Linux distributions each day, the first RC development snapshot of Linux kernel 4.14 is ready for public testing, officially closing the merge window. And it looks like some core new functionality will be implemented in this release.

  • Linux Foundation wants to promote sustainable open source development with new initiatives

    During last week’s Open Source Summit North America in Los Angeles, the Linux Foundation announced a series of projects designed to promote sustainability and growth in open source development.

    We wrote last week about their “Open Source Guides for the Enterprise,” which will see a series of guides by professionals from many different organizations released over the next few months.

    Following that, the foundation announced the Community Health Analytics for Open Source Software, or CHAOSS, project. With CHAOSS, the Linux Foundation wants to provide a platform for measuring and analyzing open source projects.

    The foundation also announced that it has granted a CII security badge to 100 projects through a voluntary process for open source projects to prove their security measures stack up professionally.

  • Intel ANV Lands New Vulkan 1.0.61 Extensions, Android Prep Support
  • AMDGPU Increasing Fragment Size For Performance

    Christian König of AMD yesterday sent out an AMDGPU kernel patch for boosting the default fragment size for GCN graphics cards pre-Vega.

    The patch is quite trivial and is for boosting the default fragment size from 64KB to 2MB, similar to the move made with the latest Vega GPUs. This change is for GFX6/GFX7/GFX8 graphics processors or basically all the GCN cards prior to Vega "GFX9".

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More in Tux Machines

Servers: Microservice, Clear Linux/Containers, Spaceborne Computer

  • Microservice architecture takes a whole new approach to infrastructure
    With services like Netflix, Uber, YouTube, and Facebook, most people are used to apps that respond quickly, work efficiently, and are updated regularly. Patience is no longer a virtue, and thanks to apps like the ones mentioned above, when people use applications, they expect blistering speeds and uninterrupted service. If you do not provide that, users aren’t exactly starved for choice; it takes less than a minute to delete an app and download something else as a replacement.
  • Clear Linux Project Announces the Next Generation of Intel's Clear Containers
    Intel's Clear Linux and Clear Containers teams are happy to introduce the next-generation of Intel's Clear Containers project, version 3.0, which bring many important new features and performance improvements. Rewritten in the Go language, Intel Clear Containers 3.0 introduces support for leveraging code used for namespace-based containers and better integrates into the container ecosystem, allowing support for Docker container engine and Kubernetes. It also improves the compatibility with the POSIX family of standards. "Today’s release presents a generational and architectural shift to utilize virtcontainers, a modular and hypervisor agnostic library for hardware virtualized containers. Clear Containers 3.0 is written in Go language and boasts an OCI compatible runtime implementation (cc-runtime) that works both on top of virtcontainers, and as a platform for deployment," said Amy L Leeland, Technical Program Manager, Intel Corporation.
  • “Spaceborne” Linux Supercomputer Starts Running In Space, Achieves 1 Teraflop Speed
    About one month ago, the HPE’s Spaceborne Computer was launched into the space using SpaceX Dragon Spacecraft. This beast was launched as a result of a partnership between Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) and NASA to find out how high-performance computers perform in space. Now, this supercomputer is fully installed and operational in ISS. The performance experiment will be carried out for one year, which is roughly the time it will take for a spacecraft to travel to Mars. At the moment, lots of calculations for space research projects are carried out on Earth, but this brings in an unavoidable factor of latency.

System76's Pop!_OS Linux to Get a Beta Release Next Week with HiDPI Improvements

System76 is getting ready to unleash the first Beta release of their upcoming Pop!_OS Linux distribution, which should be available to download next week based on the Ubuntu 17.10 Final Beta. It appears that System76's development team recently dropped focus on the Pop!_OS Installer, which they develop in collaboration with the elementary OS team, to concentrate on fixing critical bugs and add the final touches to the Beta release. They still need to add some patches to fix backlight brightness issues on Nvidia GPUs. Read more

Server: Red Hat, Security, Samba, Docker, Microsoft Canonical and MongoDB

PocketBeagle and Android