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Server

How a Linux migration led to the creation of Amazon Web Services

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Dan Rose, chairman of Coatue Ventures and Coatue Growth, posted a thread on Twitter the other day, 280 characters or less at a time, in which he chronicled how it came about that AWS infrastructure is built on Linux.

Rose was at Amazon from 1999 to 2006, where he managed retail divisions and helped incubate the Kindle reader before moving to Facebook. So he was at Amazon in 2000 when the internet bubble popped,and one high-flying dot-com after another was shriveling up and dying, having burned through ridiculous amounts of capital on luxurious offices while often having nothing by way of a product to show for it.

Rose said Amazon’s biggest expense was the data center outfitted with expensive Sun servers. Amazon’s motto was “get big fast,” and site stability was critical. Every second of downtime meant lost sales, and Sun was the gold standard for internet servers back then. I can recall them having a significant software business led by a VP named Eric Schmidt.

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5 reasons why you should develop a Linux container strategy

Filed under
Linux
Server

Containerization has gained in popularity over the past few years. However, the subject still remains elusive for some. There are many different opinions revolving around this architectural paradigm, spanning from "containers are just a way to obfuscate bad code" to "you are a dinosaur if your entire infrastructure isn't already containerized."

If you have one of these strong opinions, this post probably is not for you. The following is for those who have not had the time nor bandwidth to research the topic and are not sure how the architecture might help within their organization. In this article, I give a simple explanation of some of the advantages of adopting a container strategy within your infrastructure and give you some quick and simple tips to get started. There are, in fact, many advantages of containerization within your infrastructure, both from a technical perspective and the development lifecycle perspective.

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YunoHost 4.1 Release Makes DIY Self-Hosting Even More Simple

Filed under
Server
Debian

If you don’t know what YunoHost is, it is a Debian-based operating system that aims to make self-hosting easy by simplifying the administration of the server and letting you easily deploy apps/services.

Initially, it was developed by “Kload” but when interest around YunoHost and self-hosting started growing, more people joined in as volunteers and since then, they have been developing and maintaining the operating system.

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Facebook, Twitter Proposing CentOS Hyperscale SIG With Newer Packages + Other Changes

Filed under
Red Hat
Server

Adding to the changes abound at CentOS beyond CentOS 8 going EOL at year's end to focus instead on CentOS Stream feeding into the future RHEL, the likes of Facebook and Twitter are now proposing a Hyperscale special interest group for this RHEL-based platform.

The Hyperscale SIG will be focused on catering the Linux distribution usage to large-scale infrastructures like those used at Facebook, Twitter, and other "hyperscaler" organizations like cloud providers.

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CentOS vs Ubuntu: Server distributions compared

Filed under
Red Hat
Server
Ubuntu

The main differences between the two main Linux distributions (free) in the server field: CentOS and Ubuntu. Here’s how to choose.

Anyone who has to choose a Linux distribution for their private server, virtual or dedicated, has practically an unlimited number of options. This is due to the open source nature of the penguin operating system, which allows anyone with the appropriate skills to create their own “ad-hoc” distribution for the most varied needs.

It must be said, however, that there are few “de facto” standards today in the context of Linux servers. Taking a look at the free options, and therefore accessible to practically everyone, the two dominant distributions are CentOS VPS and Ubuntu VPS. In this article we will see, briefly, what are the main characteristics that differentiate these two distributions, and in which cases it is better to choose one rather than the other. It should be clarified right away, however, that both are valid solutions, widely used precisely because they are excellent.

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16 Free open-source email servers for enterprise and individuals

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Server

A mail server is a software package that regulate sending and receiving emails using email protocols over the internet.

Mostly, we are using several email services like Gmail, Outlook and ProtonMail. However, enterprise often require to use their infrastructure services.

Many users and companies tend to have their mail servers to own and maintain their data and keep everything in their control.

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19 Free open-source self-hosted Invoicing and billing solutions

Filed under
Server
OSS
Web

In a dynamic business environment invoices are created regularly and require custom workflow according to the enterprise business process.

Invoice and order management solutions are built to manage billing and invoicing documents generally. Some of them manage orders and post-sale subscription billing.

Most of ERP (Enterprise Resources Planning) solutions include invoice, billing and order management features.

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Docker Alternative Container Tools in 2021

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

Docker is the most popular and widely used free and open-source container management system. Docker helps in building, deploying, and shipping software applications in an isolated environment; known as a container. A container contains the libraries, dependencies, and configurations required for the software package to run and work properly.

In the past, Docker has been the only go-to easy-to-use containerization technology. Many projects have come as Docker alternative and competitors in the market over the past few years. Some of the common Docker alternatives in the market are listed as follows.

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10 Linux System Administrators New Year’s Resolutions for 2021

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Server

It is a time to make our New Year’s resolutions. Regardless of your experience level as a Linux system administrator, we think it is worth and well to set goals for growth for the next 12 months.

In case you are out of ideas, in this post we will share 10 simple professional resolutions that you may want to consider for 2021.

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2020 Time Zone Database (tzdata) changes

Filed under
Red Hat
Server

Daylight saving time transitions, a zone name change, and the removal of some obsolete files: These are some of the changes that occurred in the Time Zone Database (tzdata) package that provides Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) and applications with time zone information.

The GNU C Library (glibc) makes use of the tzdata package in order to make APIs such as strftime() work correctly, while applications such as /usr/bin/date make use of this information to print the local date. The tzdata package contains the data files documenting both current and historic transitions for various time zones around the world. This data represents changes required by local government bodies or by time zone boundary changes, as well as changes to UTC offsets and daylight saving time (DST).

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More in Tux Machines

Free, Libre, and Open Source Software Leftovers

  • Raptor Announces Kestrel Open-Source, Open HDL/Firmware Soft BMC

    Raptor Engineering known for their work on open-source POWER9 systems has announced Kestrel, an open-source baseboard management controller (BMC) design that is open down to the HDL design and firmware. Raptor describes Kestrel as "the world's first open HDL / open firmware soft BMC, built on POWER and capable of IPLing existing OpenPOWER systems!" This isn't a physical BMC chip but a "soft" BMC that is currently designed and tested on Lattice ECP-5 FPGAs. It can currently handle an initial program load (IPL) for a POWER9 host like the Blackbird and Talos II systems of Raptor Computing Systems after deactivating the existing ASpeed hardware BMC found on those systems.

  • Apache Superset Reaches Top-Level Status For Big Data Visualizations

    The Apache Software Foundation announced on Thursday that Apache Superset reached "top-level" status. Apache Superset is the project's big data visualization and business intelligence web solution. Apache Superset allows for big data exploration and visualization with data from a variety of databases ranging from SQLite and MySQL to Amazon Redshift, Google BigQuery, Snowflake, Oracle Database, IBM DB2, and a variety of other compatible data sources.

  • Intel oneAPI Level Zero 1.1 Headers/Loader Released

    The oneAPI Level Zero repository consisting of the Level Zero API headers, Level Zero loader, and validation layer have reached version 1.1. Following last year's big oneAPI 1.0 "Gold" status, Intel's open-source oneAPI effort continues moving along with the Level Zero focus as their low-level, direct-to-metal interface for offload accelerators like GPUs and other "XPU" devices.

  • [Older] A short journey to x86 long mode in coreboot on recent Intel platforms

    While it was difficult to add initial x86_64 support in coreboot, as described in my last blog article how-to-not-add-x86_64-support-to-coreboot it was way easier on real hardware. During the OSFC we did a small hackathon at 9elements and got x86_64 working in coreboot on recent Intel platforms. If you want to test new code that deals with low level stuff like enabling x86_64 mode in assembly, it's always good to test it on qemu using KVM. It runs the code in ring 0 instead of emulating every single instruction and thus is very close to bare metal machines.

Python Programming

  • How to Create a Database in MongoDB Using Python

    There’s no doubt that Python is a powerful—and popular—programming language capable of handling any project we throw its way. It is very flexible and can adjust to suit various development environments like penetration testing to web development and machine learning. When coupled to large applications such as those that require databases, Python adds more functionality and can be hard to work with, especially for beginners. Python knows this add provides us with better ways to add databases to our projects without compromising our workflow using a simple and intuitive NoSQL database. Using Python and a popular NoSQL database, MongoDB, development becomes more comfortable and, all in all, fun. This article will go over various MongoDB database concepts to give you a firm understanding of what it entails. After that, we will cover how to install MongoDB on Linux and show you how to use Python to interact with MongoDB.

  • Python Script to Monitor Network Connection

    The need to have our devices always connected to the internet is becoming more of a basic need than an added privilege. Having applications and devices that need to log, send, and receive data to the outside world is critical. Thus, having a tool that allows you to monitor when your network goes down can help you troubleshoot the network or stop the applications before sending a bunch of log errors. In today’s tutorial, we will build a simple network monitor that continually monitors your internet connectivity by sending ping requests to an external resource. The script we shall create shall also keep logs of when the internet is down and the duration of the downtime:

  • How to Build a Web Traffic Monitor with Python, Flask, SQLite, and Pusher

    If you have a web application running out there on the internet, you will need to know where your visitors are coming from, the systems they’re using, and other such things. Although you can use services such as Google Analytics, Monster Insights, etc., it’s more fun to build a monitoring system using Python, SQL database, and Pusher for real-time data updates. In today’s tutorial, we’ll go over how to create such a tool using Python, Flask, and Pusher. The tutorial is a highly-customized spin-off from a tutorial published on Pusher’s official page.

today's howtos

  • Linux 101: How to copy files and directories from the command line

    Are you new to Linux? If so, you've probably found the command line can be a bit intimidating. Don't worry--it is for everyone at the beginning. That's why I'm here to guide you through the process, and today I'm going to show you how to copy files and folders from the command line. Why would you need to copy files and folders this way? You might find yourself on a GUI-less Linux server and need to make a backup of a configuration file or copy a data directory. Trust me, at some point you're going to need to be able to do this. Let's find out how.

  • How to install Headless Dropbox on Ubuntu Server

    Dropbox can be termed as cloud-based file storage that makes your files available at any given time as long as you are connected to the internet. A local user accesses files by syncing to Dropbox. This aids to automatically update all removed and added files to your cloud-based storage. Most people are curious to know how the headless Dropbox can be installed on an Ubuntu Server. To learn more, follow the article below for detailed information, including screenshots of how the installation process is done.

  • Masterby Books by Michael W Lucas

    Look what was delievered a few days ago! Can’t wait to skill up in both SUDO and PAM modules. Michael W Lucas has written dozens of technical books on some of the most fascinating aspects of systems administration - I’ve read SSH Mastery book in the past and will someday try using FreeBSD for real just because Michael wrote so many books about this wonderful OS.

  • Cloud Native Patterns: a free ebook for developers

    Building cloud native applications is a challenging undertaking, especially considering the rapid evolution of cloud native computing. But it’s also very liberating and rewarding. You can develop new patterns and practices where the limitations of hardware dependent models, geography, and size no longer exist. This approach to technology can make cloud application developers more agile and efficient, even as it reduces deployment costs and increases independence from cloud service providers.

  • I am TheeMahn

    Let’s say you screw up your sources, Keysnatcher will fix them automatically. Nasup, dont have a NAS No Problemo I just told you use 0 memory. I can make it disable the service, I would not want it adding 6 seconds to your boot time. I have 20 Gigabit Networking and really understand. If you do have a NAS I want that picked up off the rip.

  • How to Install and Use the Etcher Tool on Ubuntu

    In most cases, when we’re trying out a new OS, we choose to install it on the main machine, a virtual machine, or to boot alongside another operating system. One of the upsides to using a Linux system is that we can boot using Live media, which makes it possible to test a specific distribution without altering the primary structure. Using bootable media such as USB drives, we can burn an iso image and boot from it or even use it to install the OS. Although there are various ways to create bootable media—UnetBootIn, dd (Unix), Rufus, Disk Utility, etcetera, —having a simple and cross-platform tool can be massively advantageous.

  • What is the difference between Paramiko and Netmiko?

    When it comes to networking, there is a wide range of perspectives, and one cannot master how to interact with all the devices in the real world. However, all networking devices share similar functionality that, when mastered, are automatable. As mentioned in my other tutorials, programmers are lazy and always looking to improve efficiency—thus doing the least work —, and when it comes to automating network-related issues, many often jump at the chance. In today’s quick guide, I’ll introduce you to automating SSH using two popular Python libraries: Paramiko and Netmiko. We will create simple python scripts using the two libraries to automate SSH and interact with network devices. I choose this approach because a guide primarily focused on the differences between Paramiko and Netmiko would be too short—a simple table would suffice—and no-concrete. By taking this approach, you’ll be better able to experiment with them and see which does what and how.

  • How to Use Unison to Synchronize Files Between Servers

    This tutorial will show you how to set up and use the Unison File synchronization tool on Debian systems. Using Unison, you can sync files between two different disks or directories in the same system or two other systems over the network.

  • How to detect the file system type of an unmounted device on Linux

    If you want to store data on a new hard drive or a USB memory stick, what you first need to do is to create a "filesystem" on it. This step is also known as "formating" the drive or the USB stick. A filesystem determines in exactly what format data is organized, stored and accessed on a physical device. It is often necessary to know the type of filesystem created on a hard disk or a USB thumb drive even before mounting it. For example, you may need to explicitly specify filesystem type when mounting a disk device, or have to use a filesystem-specific mount command (e.g., mount.aufs, mount.ntfs).

How to Install yay AUR Helper in Arch Linux [Beginner’s Guide]

This beginner’s guide explains the steps to install the Yay AUR helper in Arch Linux. Read more