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Servers: Google, Kubernetes, Red Hat and SUSE

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  • Google Open-sources Sandboxed API, a tool that helps in automating the process of porting existing C and C++ code

    Yesterday, the team at Google open-sourced Sandboxed API, a tool that Google has been using internally for its data centers for years. It is a project for sandboxing C and C++ libraries running on Linux systems. Google has made the Sandboxed API available on GitHub.

    Sandboxed API helps coders to automate the process of porting their existing C and C++ code in order to run on top of Sandbox2, which is Google’s custom-made sandbox environment for Linux operating systems. Sandbox2 has also been open-sourced and is included with Sandboxed API GitHub repository.

    Christian Blichmann & Robert Swiecki, from Google’s ISE Sandboxing team, said, “Many popular software containment tools might not sufficiently isolate the rest of the OS, and those which do, might require time-consuming redefinition of security boundaries for each and every project that should be sandboxed.”

  • Google open-sources its Sandboxed API tools for isolating application processes

    Google LLC has open-sourced a new tool for developers that lets them sandbox C and C++ libraries that run on Linux-based operating systems.

    Developed internally by Google, the Sandboxed API has been used in its data centers for several years already, the company said in a blog post Monday announcing the move. Google has made Sandboxed API available to download on GitHub, together with its documentation that describes how to get it up and running.

  • Init Container Build Pattern: Knative build with plain old Kubernetes deployment

    With Kubernetes evolving at supersonic speed and seeing a lot of adoption in the enterprise world, the developer community is now looking for solutions to common Kubernetes problems, such as patterns. In this article, I will explore a new Kubernetes pattern using Init Containers.

    Let’s start with the use case that gave birth to this problem: Quarkus—Supersonic and Subatomic Java—has excited the Java developer community with its amazing speed and all new native build artifact for Java applications. As one of those excited developers, I want to quickly build and deploy a Quarkus application on to Kubernetes.

  • KubeEdge, a Kubernetes Native Edge Computing Framework

    Open source edge computing is going through its most dynamic phase of development in the industry. So many open source platforms, so many consolidations and so many initiatives for standardization! This shows the strong drive to build better platforms to bring cloud computing to the edges to meet ever increasing demand. KubeEdge, which was announced last year, now brings great news for cloud native computing! It provides a complete edge computing solution based on Kubernetes with separate cloud and edge core modules. Currently, both the cloud and edge modules are open sourced.

    Unlike certain light weight kubernetes platforms available around, KubeEdge is made to build edge computing solutions extending the cloud. The control plane resides in cloud, though scalable and extendable. At the same time, the edge can work in offline mode. Also it is lightweight and containerized, and can support heterogeneous hardware at the edge. With the optimization in edge resource utlization, KubeEdge positions to save significant setup and operation cost for edge solutions. This makes it the most compelling edge computing platform in the world currently, based on Kubernetes!

  • Red Hat Security: The Product Security Blog has moved!

    Red Hat Product Security has joined forces with other security teams inside Red Hat to publish our content in a common venue using the Security channel of the Red Hat Blog. This move provides a wider variety of important Security topics, from experts all over Red Hat, in a more modern and functional interface. We hope everyone will enjoy the new experience!

  • From virtualization to emerging workloads: How Red Hat and NVIDIA are driving enterprise innovation

    Innovations like artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML) and other emerging workloads present a vision of IT’s future, one where intelligent solutions can more effectively analyze and address evolving business needs. But this vision can be limited by current IT infrastructure, which can often require significant investments in order to enable new workloads.

    One answer to this challenge is through workload acceleration, which uses specialized computational resources, like graphic processing units (GPUs) to tackle intense computing tasks. Established in scientific and research computing, GPUs such as those offered by NVIDIA are now catching the attention of enterprise IT as a technology that can accelerate compute-intensive operations found in data science and AI, extending their reach to a broader range of end users.

  • SUSE Enterprise Storage 6 Beta Program

    SUSE Enterprise Storage 6, the upcoming release from SUSE, enables IT organizations to seamlessly adapt to changing business demands while reducing IT operational expense with new features focused on containerized and cloud workload support, improved integration with public cloud and enhanced data protection capabilities. This release of SUSE Enterprise Storage will be available for first customer ship in early June. However, you can download a BETA version today and give release 6 a test drive. It is built on the upstream Ceph release: Nautilus and updated to run on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 15 SP1 BETA. There are a lot of new features in SUSE Enterprise Storage 6.

  • From Paris with Love

    Last week, I had the great pleasure of being among the team representing SUSE at HPE’s Technology and Solutions Summit (aka HPE TSS) in Paris. HPE’s largest and most comprehensive technical and solutions knowledge transfer event is aimed at presales consultants and solutions architects from HPE and their partners, bringing together teams from within HPE and their partner community all with the aim of sharing knowledge about their products and services.

    Around 3,000 delegates converged upon the City of Lights to learn, exchange ideas and have a little fun in the city that is home to Notre Dame Cathedral, the Louvre Museum, the legendary Eiffel Tower, and of course the many creperies serving up delicious treats to hungry visitors!

Servers: VMware, US Department of Energy, Red Hat/Fedora and SUSE/SAP

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  • VMware demos hypervisor running on a network card

    VMware has demonstrated Linux running on a network card.

    Speaking at the VMware user group convention in Sydney today, Chris Wolf, chief technology officer, global field and industry demonstrated a VMware’s ESXi hypervisor and a Ubuntu guest VM running on a Mellanox SmartNIC.

  • Aurora Will Be The First Exascale Supercomputer Of America

    The exascale supercomputer has the ability to make use of high-performance computing (HPC) and artificial intelligence (AI) in various areas such as cancer research, climate modeling, and veterans’ health treatments, and more. Aurora will be specially designed to analyze the large amount of data generated by DOE-owned equipment like particle accelerators, telescopes, and other detectors.

  • Intel Xe Graphics Being Part Of The First US Exascale Supercomputer Is Great For Linux

    Announced on Monday was that the US Department of Energy in cooperation with Argonne National Laboratory will see the "Aurora" supercomputer as the first US Exascale SC coming online in 2021 and featuring Intel's highly anticipated Xe Graphics.

    The Intel Xe Graphics are expected to put Aurora over the edge in being the first exascale super computer at least within the United States. Aurora will also feature Optane persistent DIMMs and next-generation Xeon processors. Intel is partnered with Cray on this design for the half a billion USD super computer.

  • Career advice for engineers: Step away from the keyboard

    Over the course of my career, I've had two to three major mindset shifts in how I approach my work. At first, I just focused on engineering—trying to know the most about whatever language or libraries I was using, being very "trivia" focused, and ultimately ignoring the concerns of others in an effort to just write good code. This wasn't to say I didn't try to get along with my coworkers or help them out, but my efforts to improve were all about me; after all, the team and the company do better as I become better. And to be fair, this approach isn't totally unfounded in its merits. As engineers, we must constantly evolve, learn more, and improve because the industry is getting harder with bigger problems that need more technical solutions every day. This approach worked well enough for me for the first half of my career, where I was junior enough to have such selfish (albeit well-meaning) motivations.

    Then I took a job where I worked with more engineers in one office than I had worked with in my entire career to date. This job nearly broke me. I went from being one of the better people in my role to barely scraping by… for nearly two years. I struggled to succeed, I constantly felt outclassed by the people around me, and many days I couldn't figure out why they even hired me (a feeling, it turns out, that some of my co-workers shared). But there was no big epiphany, no single defining moment that turned it around. Just a series of hard, abject failures from which I had two choices—give up or learn and grow. I did my best to do the latter. As I moved back to a smaller startup, I saw firsthand just how important it is to cement a culture, from the ground up, based around these lessons.

    My final mindset shift happened when I transitioned into management after the startup was acquired by a larger company. I didn't choose to be a manager; management chose me, in that I was offered the position. I was also told that, while everyone really believed in me, the ultimate reason they chose me was that they felt it would be less tumultuous to promote someone from within than hiring someone from outside. We had a very aggressive timeframe after the acquisition, and my new company didn't want to risk things by bringing in an outside leader who didn't have the team's trust. I found that this phase reinforced everything I had learned before about being effective in an engineering role—and turned up the dial on how hard I need to apply these lessons every minute of every day.

  • Why you should take the jobs no one else wants

    So often, we describe open organizations as places overflowing with highly engaged people—places where leaders emerge spontaneously to tackle urgent problems, where people opt-in to challenging initiatives they know they can influence and drive, where teams act with initiative and few top-down mandates.

    And it's all true. I see it regularly at Red Hat.

  • OpenShift 4 ISV Operators

    In Red Hat OpenShift 4, the Operator Hub provides access to community and certified operators that facilitate the deployment and configuration of potentially complex applications. In this video, we take a look at creating and scaling a Couchbase cluster using the operator shipped with OpenShift 4.

  • Contribution opportunity! Quick docs!

    Quick docs are meant to be short articles on the official Fedora documentation site that cover commonly used workflows/tools.

    Unlike wiki pages which are generally unreviewed, information on quick-docs follows the PR (peer-review + pull request) process. So the new information that is added there is more trustworthy and should be too, given that quick docs is listed on the official Fedora documentation website.

  • We did it again – Our HA solution is SAP Certified

    One of the main differences is that the new setup is now also supported for clusters with more than two nodes (n>2). We recommend to use an odd number of nodes to guarantee that always a majority of the cluster could proceed after cluster separations.

Server: Bitcoin, ArcShell, Red Hat Summit , IBM, Kubernetes and More

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  • What is BTCPay Server? Free & Open Source Bitcoin Payment Processor

    Bitcoin’s potential as a decentralized, P2P digital currency is, in many cases, limited by the extension of the application and design space around the legacy cryptocurrency. Particularly in regards to merchant adoption, legacy payment processing services remain much more straightforward to use.

    Bitcoin is an invention of money, not explicitly payments. However, furthering its adoption as a means of payment will go a long way in bolstering its prominence among the mainstream.

  • ArcShell offers modular automation development with Bash

    ArcShell is an open-source modular development framework for building automation solutions using Bash. It runs on most Unix and Linux hosts. It’s easy to install, easy to distribute, and easy to build upon. New capabilities are added every week, and the project is actively maintained.

    I am the founder of Arclogic Software and the developer of ArcShell. I have been building automation and monitoring solutions from scratch for two decades.

    I am frustrated by the lack of unified solutions to the kinds of problems everyone writing scripts encounters. The answers I find are often not up to date, portable, buggy, and generally not usable for one reason or another. In August of 2016, I left a long stint working in IT services to pursue the goal of solving that problem by building ArcShell.

  • Red Hat Summit Labs Highlights 2019

    Red Hat Summit is a fantastic opportunity to learn about technologies that impact your business, and to deepen your understanding of Red Hat’s products it’s hard to beat the labs at Red Hat Summit.

    Summit labs are two-hour, hands-on sessions that walk through specific products or solutions. Everything needed to complete the labs is provided by Red Hat, from laptop/workstation to content and remote access to a pre-built environment.

    Instructors help students walk through the labs step by step. Red Hat labs are proctored by Red Hat engineers, and are an opportunity to not only learn about technology, but also to meet some of the people building the technology.

  • Entry Power S812 Gets A New – But Still Short – Lease On Life

    Despite the fact that Moore’s Law increases in performance in CPUs have been slowing for years, for many customers, the growth in the throughput performance of processors as more cores and threads are added to a Power9 chip have outstripped the capacity growth requirements for many IBM i shops. For many of these customers, a single core Power7, Power7+, or even Power8 processor did the trick just fine, and is better suited to their needs than an entry Power9 machine with just one core running IBM i.

    We would argue – and have argued many times – that what IBM needs to do is make the Power chip cores and the IBM i and Linux licenses that run on them cheaper so more customers will consolidate X86 Linux workloads onto Linux partitions on Power and, wherever possible, port X86 Windows Server workloads to Linux on Power and pull these in, too. This would mop up all of that extra capacity, and provide a more integrated, hybrid system than is possible over the network, and give Power Systems a nice jolt in the arm, too.

  • The What and the Why of the Cluster API

    Early in the evolution of the Kubernetes project, there was a desire for configurability, as different environments had varying constraints. This flexibility gave way to a myriad of assertions, and opinions, that initially fragmented the community around installation paths. However, it was clear to the community that there were a set of common overlapping concerns, or a lowest common denominator. In order to address these specific concerns, kubeadm was born as a composable bootstrapping tool for Kubernetes clusters.

  • College student with 'visions of writing super-cool scripts' almost wipes out faculty's entire system

    Monday has once more reared its ugly head, but brings with it the charming face of Who, Me?, El Reg's weekly look at cringeworthy events of readers' pasts.

    This week, we meet "Ted", who tells us of a time many years ago when he was at a local college taking a course in computing.

    "At the time, we were one of the first to go through a new curriculum that combined both hardware and software engineering," Ted said.

Servers: IBM/Red Hat Delay, Submariner, Jenkins and More

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  • Signs emerge IBM-Red Hat merger may face delay; IBM says it's still on

    Is IBM's $34 billion merger with Red Hat in trouble? Is it facing delays?

  • Rancher Labs Submariner Project Links Kubernetes Clusters

    Sheng Liang, CEO and co-founder of Rancher Labs, explained that Submariner creates the necessary tunnels and routes between Kubernetes clusters that allow for direct connections regardless of their location. It can be deployed into existing Kubernetes clusters with the addition of Layer-3 network connectivity between pods in different clusters.

    The project also secures those connection paths using IPSec tunnels, though Rancher Labs does plan to add different interconnectivity plugins. Liang said this includes additional remote connectivity plugins for WAN-optimized or SD-WAN technologies.

  • Jenkins tries to reinvent itself as cloud-native for Kubernetes

    The popular but troubled Jenkins CI/CD system is being reworked to support cloud-native applications on the Kubernetes container-orchestration platform. The Jenkins X project is a response to user concerns that Jenkins had lost its luster and had developed configuration and stability issues.

    Jenkins X is intended for Kubernetes users who want to adopt CI/CD or who want CI/CD and are moving to the cloud, without necessarily knowing anything about Kubernetes. Jenkins X builds on Jenkins with open source tools, promoting a Git branching and a repository model. A Jenkins distribution is used as the core CI/CD engine.

  • Chipmakers Watching Mellanox Deal With Interest

    Weekly Briefing March 15, 2019: Nvidia buys Mellanox, Facebook snatches up Sonics, Linus Foundation holds its first Open Source Leaders’ Summit, Geneva auto show

  • The Year of Open RAN

    Mobile operators are seeking to transform their networks to keep up with the demands of Industry 4.0 – as wireless connectivity requirements evolve from connected devices to connected everything – people, places, and things. Navigating the open source landscape can be a challenge as there are a number of open ecosystems that have emerged to help define how next-generation networks will be built to support 50+ billion connected devices and new 5G services and applications.

  • Cincinnati Bell division CBTS bows new open source reference architecture

    C

    CBTS is putting elements of the Open Networking Foundation's SEBA reference design into play with a new reference architecture called COI.

    [...]

    "One of the things is that R-CORD has been tough for the carriers to do themselves," said Lee Doyle, principal analyst of Doyle Research, in an interview with FierceTelecom. "They're (CBTS) trying to jump on a new market opportunity and we'll see if there's a substantial market for that or not.

    "The market is extremely nascent right now. There are a lot of people who are trialing R-CORD, but we've all seen that before with NFV. Just because you're trialing it doesn't mean you're using it."

Istio/Tetrate Funding

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OSS
  • Tetrate emerges from stealth to bring service mesh to the enterprise

    The architects of open source *service* mesh technology Istio and Envoy have broken off to set up an enterprise-grade solution aimed at large-scale customers.

  • Tetrate raises $12.5 million to manage microservices with open source software

    San Francisco startup Tetrate, which develops an app management platform for hybrid and multicloud environments, today emerged from stealth with $12.5 million in a funding round led by Dell Technologies Capital, with participation from 8VC, Intel Capital, Rain Capital, and Samsung Next. The startup also attracted individual investments from a number of industry executives, including former Cisco chief development officer Pankaj Patel, Yubico chief product officer Guido Appenzeller, and WeWork’s Shiva Rajaraman.

  • Tetrate Launches Istio Service Mesh Offering

    Tetrate this week emerged from stealth to launch what it describes as an enterprise-class implementation of a service mesh based on the open source Istio project.

    Fresh off raising $12.5 million in funding, Tetrate’s goal is to deliver a service mesh based on Istio that will span both modern containerized applications running on Kubernetes and legacy applications running on virtual machines and bare-metal servers, says CEO Varun Talwar.

Server: Facebook, Cumulus Linux and WordPress

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  • Facebook debuts Minipack, an open modular switch for datacenters

    During a keynote at the 2019 Open Compute Project (OCP) Global Summit in San Jose, Facebook today debuted Minipack, a modular whitebox network switch platform it claims is the first of its kind with an “open” design.

    “We are excited to work with the community to develop an ecosystem around Minipack,” said director of engineering at Facebook Hans-Juergen Schmidtke in a statement. “[It’s] the next generation of open, modular switch platforms that is more flexible, scalable and efficient for modern data centers.”

  • Cumulus' Linux OS first to support Facebook's modular Minipack

    Cumulus Linux will be the first network operating system to fully support Minipack, Facebook’s modular switch platform.

    Minipack is half the height of its Facebook-designed big brother, Backpack, and uses half the power. It was developed by hardware maker Edgecore Networks.

    Cumulus’ support for Minipack was announced at the Open Compute Project (OCP) Global Summit in San Jose this week.. The company also said that its Linux based OS will be available pre-installed on Minipack directly from the vendor or through Edgecore.

  • One-third of the web!

    WordPress now powers over 1/3rd of the top 10 million sites on the web according to W3Techs. Our market share has been growing steadily over the last few years, going from 29.9% just one year ago to 33.4% now. We are, of course, quite proud of these numbers!

    The path here has been very exciting. In 2005, we were celebrating 50,000 downloads. Six years later, in January 2011, WordPress was powering 13.1% of websites. And now, early in 2019, we are powering 33.4% of sites. Our latest release has already been downloaded close to 14 million times, and it was only released on the 21st of February.

Server: Containers, Quarkus, OpenShift, Kubernetes and More

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  • Unprivileged container builds using stacker

    One of the primary goals of user namespaces was to provide the ability for unprivileged users to have their own range of uids over which they would have privilege, with minimal need for setuid programs and no risk (barring bugs in the OS) of their privilege having effect on uids which are not “their own”.

    We’ve had user namespaces for awhile now. While there are some actions which cannot be done in a user namespace, such as mounting a loopback filesystem, there are many things, such as setting up a build environment with custom package installs, which used to be a challenge without privilege but are now simple.

  • Red Hat eyes cloud-native Java future with Quarkus

    Red Hat's latest initiative, Quarkus, aims to usher in a cloud-native Java future -- and shift the core of innovation in enterprise Java.

    Numerous efforts over the years have attempted to make Java more cloud-native, such as Google's Dalvik virtual machine used in Android. None has demonstrated as much promise as Red Hat Quarkus, which is based on two Oracle-led projects, GraalVM and Substrate VM, to build cloud-native Java applications that are much faster and smaller, in a Linux container as part of a Kubernetes deployment.

    GraalVM is a universal virtual machine that is used to run applications written in JavaScript, Python, Ruby, R, and Java Virtual Machine (JVM) based languages, including Java, Scala, Clojure, Kotlin, as well as low-level virtual machine-based languages, such as C and C++. Graal enables aggressive ahead-of time (AOT) compilation, so developers can compile their apps into native binary images and avoid the limitations of the JVM.

    Substrate VM, a subsystem of Graal, focuses on AOT compilation to collect Java to a native binary image, said Mark Little, vice president of engineering and CTO of JBoss Middleware at Red Hat.

  • OpenShift All-in-One (AIO) for Labs and Fun

    A common request from customers is how to run the actual Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform (OCP) bits in a single node. This request often comes from customers that need to support training environments, dedicated single-user development environments or from technical architects wanting to validate concepts without deploying a full multi-node cluster. There are many options available for developers, from Minishift to CodeReady Workspaces. These are supported options which are a great solution for application developers that want to deploy to the platform. The use cases not addressed with these solutions are more platform and infrastructure related.

  • 7 pieces of contrarian Kubernetes advice

    You can find many great resources for getting smarter about Kubernetes out there. (Ahem, we’ve written a few ourselves.)

    That’s good news for IT teams and professionals looking to boost their knowledge and consider how Kubernetes might solve problems in their organization. The excited chatter about Kubernetes has gotten so loud, however, that it can become difficult to make sense of it all. Moreover, it can be challenging to sort the actual business and technical benefits from the sales pitches.

  • SwiftStack Announces World’s First Multi-Cloud AI/ML Data Management Solution

    “The SwiftStack solution accelerates data pipelines, eliminates storage silos, and enables multi-cloud workflows, thus delivering faster business outcomes,” said Jason Blum, CTO at GPL Technologies, an NVIDIA and SwiftStack elite partner. “SwiftStack provides us with the flexibility, technology leadership and breakthrough economics to build tailored solutions for our customers.” GPL Technologies has created multiple ways to implement the solution, with NVIDIA DGX-1 GPU server(s), NVIDIA GPU Cloud, and other leading system hardware.

  • Tetrate Aims To Make Service Mesh Accessible And Enterprise Ready

    After Kubernetes, open source projects such as Istio, Envoy and Linkerd get the maximum attention from the users and cloud native community. Google backs Istio while Envoy and Linkerd are a part of the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF). Since the current service mesh technologies are available only as stock open source projects, implementing and integrating them with the rest of the microservices infrastructure is complex.

Why Linux System Administrators Need Programming Skills

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In simple terms, System Administration refers to the management of hardware and software systems. Some of the major tasks performed by a system administrator include adding and removing hardware, installing operating systems, creating, managing and removing users and groups, installing, upgrading and removing software, performing backups and monitoring the system.

A system administrator is also responsible for troubleshooting, documentation and, importantly securing a system. On the other hand, programming is concerned with writing scripts, programs to developing user applications or software.

Does a Linux system administrator need programming skills? In this article, we will elaborate on answer to this question. We will explain why learning programming concepts are significant for Linux system administration.

This article is specifically prepared for Linux users aspiring to become professional sysadmins (from now on referring to system administrators).

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Web/Server Software: Kubeflow on OpenShift, HTTP, Rspamd and Splunk (Proprietary)

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Software
Web
  • Kubeflow on OpenShift

    Kubeflow is an open source project that provides Machine Learning (ML) resources on Kubernetes clusters. Kubernetes is evolving to be the hybrid solution for deploying complex workloads on private and public clouds. A fast growing use case is using Kubernetes as the deployment platform of choice for machine learning.

    Infrastructure engineers will often spend time modifying deployments before a single model can be tested. These deployments are often bound to the clusters they have been deployed to, thus moving a model from a laptop to a cloud cluster is difficult without significant re-architecture.

  • Daniel Stenberg: Looking for the Refresh header

    The other day someone filed a bug on curl that we don’t support redirects with the Refresh header. This took me down a rabbit hole of Refresh header research and I’ve returned to share with you what I learned down there.

  • Rspamd 1.9.0 has been released
  • 12 Splunk User and Role Administration Examples for both CLI and Web

    Splunk supports three types of authentication: Native Authentication, LDAP and Scripted Authentication API.

    For most part, Native Authentication is referred as Splunk authentication, which takes high priority over any external authentication.

UCS 4.4 Release – Admin Diary, Self Services and Windows Domain Trusts

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Debian

After the extensive updates of the basic distribution with the release of UCS 4.3, our focus during the development of UCS 4.4 was on the implementation of new functionalities: The enhancements include new functions in Self Services, in the Portal, in Radius Integration and in Services for Windows. In addition, the Admin Diary is a new app with which events on the different systems or in the management system can be tracked and commented.

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