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OpenStack in the Headlines

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  • Mirantis and NTT Com Double Down on OpenStack

    Mirantis continues to drive forward with new partnerships focused on the OpenStack cloud computing platform. The company and NTT Communications Corporation (NTT Com) have announced that they will partner to offer fully managed Private OpenStack as a service in NTT Com Enterprise Cloud and its data center services across the globe. NTT Com, in becoming Mirantis’ first data center services partner, says it will offer Mirantis Managed OpenStack on NTT Com Enterprise Cloud’s Metal-as-a-Service.

  • Using metrics effectively in OpenStack development

    At the OpenStack summit taking place this month in Barcelona, Ildikó Váncsa will be speaking on metrics in her talk Metrics: Friends or Enemies? She will discuss OpenStack metrics and how they can be used in software development processes, both for the individual developer and manager.

    I caught up with Ildikó before her talk to learn more about how metrics in OpenStack help guide developers and companies, and how they also drive evolution of the OpenStack community itself.

News About Servers

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  • Demand compels container management vendor Rancher to create partner program
  • Rancher Labs Expands Container-Management Reach With New Partner Program
  • Rancher Labs Introduces Global Partner Network
  • Rancher Labs Launches Partner Program Around Open Source Container Management
  • WTF is a container?

    You can’t go to a developer conference today and not hear about software containers: Docker, Kubernetes, Mesos and a bunch of other names with a nautical ring to them. Microsoft, Google, Amazon and everybody else seems to have jumped on this bandwagon in the last year or so, but why is everybody so excited about this stuff?

    To understand why containers are such a big deal, let’s think about physical containers for a moment. The modern shipping industry only works as well as it does because we have standardized on a small set of shipping container sizes. Before the advent of this standard, shipping anything in bulk was a complicated, laborious process. Imagine what a hassle it would be to move some open pallet with smartphones off a ship and onto a truck, for example. Instead of ships that specialize in bringing smartphones from Asia, we can just put them all into containers and know that those will fit on every container ship.

  • Solving Enterprise Monitoring Issues with Prometheus

    Chicago-based ShuttleCloud helps developers import user contacts and email data into their applications through standard API requests. As the venture-backed startup began to acquire more customers, they needed a way to scale system monitoring to meet the terms of their service-level agreements (SLAs). They turned to Prometheus, the open source systems monitoring and alerting toolkit originally built at SoundCloud, which is now a project at the Cloud-Native Computing Foundation.

    In advance of Prometheus Day, to be held Nov. 8-9 in Seattle, we talked to Ignacio Carretero, a ShuttleCloud software engineer, about why they chose Prometheus as their monitoring tool and what advice they would give to other small businesses seeking a similar solution.

  • VMware Embraces Kubernetes in Container Push

    VMware is the latest IT vendor to support Kubernetes, the open-source container management system that Google developed.
    VMware announced on Oct. 18 at its VMworld 2016 Europe event that it is now supporting the Kubernetes container management system on the VMware Photon platform.

    Kubernetes is an open-source project that was developed by Google and today benefits from the contributions of a diverse community, including Red Hat and CoreOS. The Kubernetes project became part of the Linux Foundation's Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) in July 2015. The Kubernetes 1.4 release debuted on Sept. 26 with added security features.

    "We have now built a Kubernetes-as-a-service capability into Photon Platform," Jared Rosoff, chief technologist for cloud native apps at VMware, told eWEEK.

  • CoreOS Expands Kubernetes Control With Redspread Acquisition

    The purchase of container management vendor Redspread is the container startup's second acquisition.
    CoreOS on Oct. 17 announced the acquisition of privately held container management vendor Redspread. Financial terms of the deal are not being publicly disclosed.

    Redspread got its start in the Y Combinator cyber accelerator for technology startups and was officially launched in March. Coincidentally, CoreOS was also originally part of Y Combinator, graduating in 2013. To date, CoreOS has raised $48 million in funding to help fuel its container efforts. The acquisition of Redspread is the second acquisition by CoreOS and comes more than two years after CoreOS' acquisition of in 2014.

OpenStack News

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  • OpenStack & Private Cloud, at Scale, Are Cheaper Than Public Cloud

    Beyond a certain scale, commercial private clouds and OpenStack distributions are cheaper than public clouds, according to the latest Cloud Price Index from 451 Research.

    Commercial private cloud offerings from vendors such as VMware and Microsoft offer a lower total cost of ownership (TCO) when labor efficiency is lower than 400 virtual machines managed per engineer, according to the report, which was published today.

  • How OpenStack keeps its summits safe and welcoming

    The great promise of a global open source software project like OpenStack is that it can bring together the best and the brightest from all around the world to together create something far greater than any one person, company, or nation could do on its own.

    But with diversity can come challenges, as cultural norms and social expectations can vary greatly from place to place and group to group. If bringing in the best ideas requires diverse contributors, then bringing in diverse contributors requires building a safe space where each person can feel comfortable and welcome.

  • OpenStack Foundation Survey Finds the Platform Heading to Smaller Companies

    Back in April, the OpenStack Foundation released the results of its seventh official OpenStack survey, which found that sixty-five percent of OpenStack deployments were in production, 33 percent more than a year ago. Now, the foundation has released the results of the eighth official survey, which shows growing user interest in containers, and a growing focus on cost savings driven by OpenStack.

Open-source storage that doesn't suck? Our man tries to break TrueNAS

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Review Data storage is difficult, and ZFS-based storage doubly so. There's a lot of money to be made if you can do storage right, so it's uncommon to see a storage company with an open-source model deliver storage that doesn't suck.

I looked at TrueNAS from iXsystems, which, importantly, targets the SMB and midmarket with something that is theoretically more resilient than a Synology. That's really odd. Not a lot of companies do that, so it intrigued me.

I'd also had a few interesting conversations with some Reg readers about the dearth of storage offerings for the "small, but not Synology small" business space.

Read more

OSS in the Back End

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  • One CTO's mission to boost needed OpenStack skills in future IT talent

    Virtually every employer struggles to hire people with needed tech skills. But Amrith Kumar, CTO of the OpenStack database-as-a-service company Tesora, is fighting the talent crunch in the future. He's investing some of his time in working with college students, making sure there will be more available hires with OpenStack expertise. In an interview with The Enterprisers Project, Kumar explains why this work is so important.

  • OpenStack Summit, Barcelona: Your Guide to the Event

    The OpenStack Summit event in Barcelona is only days away, and you can still register. According to the OpenStack Foundation, approximately 6,000 attendees from 50+ countries are expected to attend the conference, taking place Oct. 25 – 28 in Barcelona.

    This event is a bi-annual gathering of OpenStack community members, technology leaders, developers and ecosystem supporters. Each year one summit event is held in North America and then one additional event rotates between Asia and Europe. Barcelona already has a packed schedule, and here is what you can expect from the event.

  • Mesosphere Embeds Marathon Container Orchestration in DC/OS

    While Marathon may not draw as much attention these days as other container orchestration technologies, work surrounding the platform continues. With the latest version of the DC/OS platform from Mesosphere, the Marathon container orchestration engine now comes baked in.

    Tal Broda, vice president of engineering for Mesosphere, says with version 1.8 of DC/OS via a new Services Feature the Marathon container orchestration engine can be more naturally invoked, with the same dashboard IT administrators employ to schedule jobs and perform other tasks. The end result is a more refined IT management experience.

  • A new kind of match-making: Speed mentoring

    My primary focus is to make contributing to the OpenStack community easier and more fun.

    I'm an upstream developer advocate for the OpenStack Foundation, and this work includes bringing new people into the community, making sure members of the community feel valued, and reducing conflict and removing roadblocks to contribution. It's also part of my job to smooth the path for newcomers just starting to get involved in the community.

    In many cases, people looking to contribute often don’t know where to start—a mentor can point new people in the right direction and help them feel involved and engaged.

Red Hat finds virtualization vital for enterprise despite container competition

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Red Hat

Containers are hot, but virtualization adoption remains on the rise within the enterprise, according to recent Red Hat research.

The survey of more than 900 enterprise IT pros found businesses are using virtualization to drive server consolidation, decrease provisioning time, and provide infrastructure for developers to build and deploy applications.

Read more

Also: Why Red Hat's OpenShift, not OpenStack, is making waves with developers

Docker Brings Containers to China

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ocker Inc. has set its sights on the East to help grow its container fortunes. On Oct. 13, Docker announced a wide-ranging partnership with Alibaba Cloud in a bid to help accelerate the use and deployment of Docker technologies in China.

Founded in 2009, Alibaba Cloud is the cloud division of Chinese internet giant Alibaba Group. It bills itself as China's largest cloud provider and the fourth largest web hosting provider globally. As part of new partnership with Docker Inc., Alibaba Cloud will now host a distribution of the Docker Hub.

Read more


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  • Carriers Embrace Trial & Error Approach as NFV Becomes Real

    Telcos kicked off the SDN World Congress here with boasts about how un-telco-like they’ve become, influenced by software-defined infrastructure and the world of virtualization.

    Specifically, they’re starting to adopt software’s “agile” philosophy by being willing to proceed in small steps, rather than waiting for technology to be fully baked.

  • How to stay relevant in the DevOps era: A SysAdmin's survival guide [Ed: How to stay relevant in the [stupid buzzword] era: rewrite the CV with silly buzzwords like DevOps]

    The merging of development and operations to speed product delivery, or DevOps, is all about agility, automation and information sharing. In DevOps, servers are often treated like cattle”that can be easily replaced, rather than individual pets”to be nurtured.

  • Fear Makes The Wolf Look Bigger

    DevOps is based on 3 key pillars: People, Process and Automation. I believe their importance to a business should be considered in that order.

  • Red Hat Offers Turnkey Cloud Installation Toolset

    When it comes to deploying a cloud computing solution, one of the biggest hurdles is installation. With that in mind, Red Hat recently introduced its QuickStart Cloud Installer. The new installer comes on the heels of Red Hat's OpenStack Platform 9 release, which became generally available only a few weeks ago.

OpenStack: Newton, OpenStack Day, and Contributors

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  • OpenStack Newton promises better resiliency, scalability and security

    OpenStack has released the latest edition of its popular open-source Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) cloud: Newton. With broad industry support from more than 200 vendors — including Cisco, Dell, HP Enterprise, IBM, Intel, Oracle, Rackspace, Red Hat, SUSE and VMware — this version should quickly see wide deployment.

    This release features numerous new features. Perhaps the most important is simply making OpenStack easier to use. OpenStack is powerful, but it’s notoriously hard to master. While OpenStack classes are becoming more common, even with help, mastering OpenStack isn’t easy.

  • Lessons learned as an OpenStack Day organizer
  • Recognizing OpenStack Cloud Contributors--Including Those Who Don't Code

    Although it is still a very young cloud computing platform, each week there is more evidence of how entrenched OpenStack has become in enterprises and even in smaller companies. In fact, just this week, we reported on findings that show OpenStack adoption in the telecom industry to be widespread.

    Contributors are a big part of what has driven OpenStack's success, and as the OpenStack Summit approaches, there are several new initiatives being put in place to serve up recognition for meaningful contributors. Notably, the recognition is going to partially go to those who actually contribute code, but there will also be recognition of other forms of giving to OpenStack.


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  • Docker Debuts Infrakit Open Source Toolkit for Self-Healing Infrastructure

    Docker founder Solomon Hykes officially announced the debut of the open-source Infrakit toolkit this week, in a bid to further enable DevOps to actually work.

  • Marrying Apache Spark and R for Next-Gen Data Science

    Recently, we caught up with Kavitha Mariappan, who is Vice President of Marketing at Databricks, for a guest post on open source tools and data science. In this arena, she took special note of The R Project (“R”), which is a popular open source language and runtime environment for advanced analytics. She also highlighted Apache Spark and its distributed in-memory data processing, which is fueling next-generation data science.

    Now, R users can leverage the popular dplyr package to sift and work with Apache Spark data. Via the sparklyr package, a dplyr interface for Spark, users can filter and aggregate Spark datasets then bring them into R for analysis and visualization, according to an RStudio blog post.

  • OpenStack Newton Debuts With Improved Container Features

    The latest release of widely deployed open-source cloud platform improves security, virtualization and networking.
    The open-source OpenStack project released OpenStack Newton on Oct. 6, providing the second major milestone update for the cloud platform in 2016.

    OpenStack Newton follows the Mitaka release, which debuted in April with a focus on simplifying cloud operations. In contrast, OpenStack Newton provides a long list of incremental updates and improvements, including improved security, container support and networking capabilities.

  • OpenStack’s latest release focuses on scalability and resilience

    OpenStack, the massive open source project that helps enterprises run the equivalent of AWS in their own data centers, is launching the 14th major version of its software today. Newton, as this new version is called, shows how OpenStack has matured over the last few years. The focus this time is on making some of the core OpenStack services more scalable and resilient. In addition, though, the update also includes a couple of major new features. The project now better supports containers and bare metal servers, for example.

    In total, more than 2,500 developers and users contributed to Newton. That gives you a pretty good sense of the scale of this project, which includes support for core data center services like compute, storage and networking, but also a wide range of smaller projects.

  • OpenStack Newton, the 14th Official Release, Arrives

    The OpenStack community today released Newton, and it's hard to believe that this is the 14th version of the most widely deployed open source software for building clouds. "New features in the Ironic bare metal provisioning service, Magnum container orchestration cluster manager, and Kuryr container networking project more seamlessly integrate containers, virtual and physical infrastructure under one control plane," the announcement notes. "These new capabilities address more use cases for organizations with heterogeneous environments, who are looking for speed and better developer experience with new technologies like containers, alongside workloads that require virtual machines or higher availability architectures."

    Here is more on what's under the hood and how this new version embraces virtualization and containers.

    The 14th release improves the user experience for container cluster management and networking, and the Newton release addresses scalability and resiliency. These capabilities will be demonstrated at the upcoming OpenStack Summit, happening October 25-28, in Barcelona Spain.

    “The OpenStack community is focused on making clouds work better for users. This is clearly evident in the Newton release, which tackles users’ biggest needs, giving cloud operators and app developers greater security, resiliency and choice,” said Jonathan Bryce, executive director of the OpenStack Foundation. “The new features and enhancements in Newton underscore the power of OpenStack: it handles more workloads in more ways across more industries worldwide. OpenStack is a cloud platform that ties everything together—compute, network, storage, and innovative cloud technologies.”

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