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Development

6 Essential Python Tools for Data Science

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Data science is an emerging, multidisciplinary field of scientific methods, processes, algorithm development and technology to extract knowledge or insights in ingenious ways from structured or unstructured data.

At the heart of data science is data. Buckets loads of it, streaming in and stored in enterprise data warehouses. According to IBM, globally, we currently generate over 2.5 quintillion bytes of data every single day. This data ranges from molecular biology to social media activity, astronomy, climate monitoring to health care. Large data sets are now generated by almost every activity in science, society, and commerce. There’s much to learn by mining that data, finding patterns and making predictions from this data. Data science is ultimately about asking interesting questions, and then finding answers using data that add value.

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Also: What is behavior-driven Python?

Programming: Fonts, Jupyter, and Open Source FPGAs

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  • 11 Best Programming Fonts

    There are many posts and sites comparing fonts for programming and they are all amazing articles. So why I repeated the same subject here? Since I always found myself lost in dozens of fonts and could not finger out which one was best for me. So today I tried many fonts and picked up the following fonts for you. These fonts are pretty popular and easy to get. And most importantly, all these fonts are FREE!

  • New open-source web apps available for students and faculty

    Jupyter is an open source web environment for writing code and visualizing data. Over the past few years, it has become increasingly popular across a wide range of academic disciplines.

    [...]

    JupyterHub is a variation of the Jupyter project, which adds support for user account management and enterprise authentication. The TLT instance allows students and faculty to log in with their credentials for full access to their own Jupyter environment and provides direct access to their Penn State Access Account Storage Space (PASS). Using PASS for storage provided a large persistent storage space that students and faculty were already familiar with and was easily accessible from the local lab systems or their personal devices.

  • An Ultrasound Driver With Open Source FPGAs

    Ultrasound imaging has been around for decades, but Open Source ultrasound has not. While there are a ton of projects out there attempting to create open ultrasound devices, most of this is concentrated on the image-processing side of things, and not the exceptionally difficult problem of pinging a sensor at millions of times a second, listening for the echo, and running that through a very high speed ADC.

    For his entry into the Hackaday Prize, [kelu124] is doing just that. He’s building an ultrasound board that’s built around Open Hardware, a fancy Open Source FPGA, and a lot of very difficult signal processing. It also uses some Rick and Morty references, so you know this is going to be popular with the Internet peanut gallery.

    The design of the ultrasound system is based around an iCE40 FPGA, the only FPGA with an Open Source toolchain. Along with this, there are a ton of ADCs, a DAC, pulsers, and a high voltage section to drive the off-the-shelf ultrasound head. If you’re wondering how this ultrasound board interfaces with the outside world, there’s a header for a Raspberry Pi on there, too, so this project has the requisite amount of blog cred.

Programming: GitLab, Security, Power and Jakarta EE

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Development
  • GitLab 10.8 open sources push mirroring

    GitLab 10.8 was released this week with the open sourcing of a highly requested feature. The company announced its push mirroring capability is now open sourced.

    Push mirroring was originally introduced as a paid feature, but GitLab says it is one of the most frequently requested to be moved into the open-source codebase.

    This move will add a few new use cases for GitLab Core users, such as freelance developers being able to mirror client repos and users migrating to GitLab being able to use push mirroring to ease the migration path.

  • How Security Can Bridge the Chasm with Development

    Enhancing the relationships between security and engineering is crucial for improving software security. These six steps will bring your teams together.

    There's always been a troublesome rift between enterprise security teams and software developers. While the friction is understandable, it's also a shame, because the chasm between these teams makes it all the more challenging to build quality applications that are both great to use and safe.

  • Which Programming Languages Use the Least Electricity?

    Can energy usage data tell us anything about the quality of our programming languages?

    Last year a team of six researchers in Portugal from three different universities decided to investigate this question, ultimately releasing a paper titled “Energy Efficiency Across Programming Languages.” They ran the solutions to 10 programming problems written in 27 different languages, while carefully monitoring how much electricity each one used — as well as its speed and memory usage.

  • How Java EE found new life as Jakarta EE

    The title of this post may seem strange, but if you look a bit into Java EE's recent history, it will make sense.

    Originally, Sun started and ran Java Enterprise Edition, and later Oracle took over after it acquired Sun. Specifications were driven by a Sun/Oracle-governed process. At more or less regular intervals, they made a new version of the specification available, which was implemented by the server vendors. Those vendors had to license the technology compatibility kits (TCKs) and brand from Oracle.

    Let's fast-forward a bit. In 2013, Java EE 7 was released, and Oracle began work on EE8, but it did not progress quickly. Meanwhile, new technologies like Docker and Kubernetes came along and changed the way applications run. Instead of running a single fat server process on a big machine, the software is now split into smaller, independent services that run in a (usually) Docker container orchestrated by Kubernetes.

Qt 5.11 released

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  • Qt 5.11 released

    Slightly ahead of our planned schedule, we have released Qt 5.11 today. As always, Qt 5.11 comes with quite a few new features as well as many bug fixes to existing functionality. Let’s have a look at some of the cool new features.

  • Qt 5.11 Released With A Big Arsenal Of Updates

    The Qt Company has managed to release Qt 5.11 one week ahead of schedule compared to its original road-map, which is quite a feat considering some of the past Qt5 release delays. Beyond that, Qt 5.11.0 is offering a big slab of improvements.

Python Language Summit: Coverage by LWN

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  • The 2018 Python Language Summit

    Over the past three years, LWN and its readers have gotten a yearly treat in the form of coverage of the Python Language Summit; this year is no exception. The summit is a yearly gathering of around 40 or 50 developers from CPython, other Python implementations, and related projects. It is held on the first day of PyCon, which is two days before the main PyCon talk tracks begin. This year, the summit was held on May 9 in Cleveland, Ohio.

  • A Gilectomy update

    In a rather short session at the 2018 Python Language Summit, Larry Hastings updated attendees on the status of his Gilectomy project. The aim of that effort is to remove the global interpreter lock (GIL) from CPython. Since his status report at last year's summit, little has happened, which is part of why the session was so short. He hasn't given up on the overall idea, but it needs a new approach.

    Gilectomy has been "untouched for a year", Hastings said. He worked on it at the PyCon sprints after last year's summit, but got tired of it at that point. He is "out of bullets" at least with that approach. With his complicated buffered-reference-count approach he was able to get his "gilectomized" interpreter to reach performance parity with CPython—except that his interpreter was running on around seven cores to keep up with CPython on one.

  • Modifying the Python object model

    At the 2018 Python Language Summit, Carl Shapiro described some of the experiments that he and others at Instagram did to look at ways to improve the performance of the CPython interpreter. The talk was somewhat academic in tone and built on what has been learned in other dynamic languages over the years. By modifying the Python object model fairly substantially, they were able to roughly double the performance of the "classic" Richards benchmark.

    Shapiro said that Instagram is a big user of Python and has been looking for ways to improve the performance of the CPython interpreter for its workloads. So the company started looking at the representation of data in the interpreter to see if there were gains to be made there. It wanted to stick with CPython in order to preserve the existing API, ecosystem, and developer experience

  • Subinterpreter support for Python

    Eric Snow kicked off the 2018 edition of the Python Language Summit with a look at getting a better story for multicore Python by way of subinterpreters. Back in 2015, we looked at his efforts at that point; things have been progressing since. There is more to do, of course, so he is hoping to attract more developers to work on the project.

    Snow has been a core developer since 2012 and has "seen some interesting stuff" over that time. He has been working on the subinterpreters scheme for four years or so.

Programming: GNU Parallel, Rust, Go

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Development Leftovers

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Development
  • My talk from the RISC-V workshop in Barcelona
  • KDAB at SIGGRAPH 2018

    Yes, folks. This year SIGGRAPH 2018 is in Canada and we’ll be there at the Qt booth, showing off our latest tooling and demos. These days, you’d be surprised where Qt is used under the hood, even by the biggest players in the 3D world!

  • 9 Best Free Python Integrated Development Environments

    Python is a widely used general-purpose, high level programming language. It’s easy to read and learn. It’s frequently used for science, data analysis, and engineering. With a burgeoning scientific community and ecosystem, Python is an excellent environment for students, scientists and organizations that develop technology software.

    One of the essential tools for a budding Python developer is a good Integrated Development Environment (IDE). An IDE is a software application that provides comprehensive facilities to programmers for software development.

    Many coders learn to code using a text editor. And many professional Python developers prefer to stay with their favourite text editor, in part because a lot of text editors can be used as a development environment by making use of plugins. But many Python developers migrate to an IDE as this type of software application offers, above all else, practicality. They make coding easier, can offer significant time savings with features like autocompletion, and built-in refactoring code, and also reduces context switching. For example, IDEs have semantic knowledge of the programming language which highlights coding problems while typing. Compiling is ‘on the fly’ and debugging is integrated.

  • Want to Debug Latency?

    In the recent decade, our systems got complex. Our average production environments consist of many different services (many microservices, storage systems and more) with different deployment and production-maintenance cycles. In most cases, each service is built and maintained by a different team — sometimes by a different company. Teams don’t have much insight into others’ services. The final glue that puts everything together is often a staging environment or sometimes the production itself!

    Measuring latency and being able to react to latency issues are getting equally complex as our systems got more complex. This article will help you how to navigate yourself at a latency problem and what you need to put in place to effectively do so.

Introduction To VPS Or Virtual Private Server

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VPS or Virtual Private Server is a virtual machine that’s hosted somewhere in the world. A VPS provider divides a physical computer into multiple virtual computers and one can buy and access those virtual machines as a service. Each virtual machine runs its own operating system so you can perform […]

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GNOME Development/Developers

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Development
GNOME
  • Nautilus Ability To Launch Binaries Or Scripts To Be Reverted, Might Be Implemented Differently

    It looks like the decision to remove the ability to run binaries and scripts from Nautilus file manager will be reverted. The change comes after some use cases appeared that the developers agreed they need to support, "especially for enterprise and content creators".

    One such use case that was mentioned as a reason for reverting this is a small "if then that" script for building HTML and PDF files, which uses Zenity to display a dialog, as well as notifications to display the progress.

    I find the use case being used as an example a bit weird because that's certainly not something common, like a self-extracting game script for instance.

  • Stickers in Riot

    The matrix.org protocol is flexible so this is a good example of how to add new features to the clients that uses matrix without the need to change the protocol.

    This is not a core feature because you can send images, but I think this is great and add a simple way to show reactions for the users, so as I was reading I thought that we can add this to Fractal, so I started to read how we can add support for this.

  • Talking at GPN 2018 in Karlsruhe, Germany

    Similar to last year I managed to attend the Gulasch Programmier-Nacht (GPN) in Karlsruhe, Germany. Not only did I attend, I also managed to squeeze in a talk about PrivacyScore. We got the prime time slot on the opening day along with all the other relevant talks, including the Eurovision Song Contest, so we were not overly surprised that the audience had a hard time deciding where to go and eventually decided to attend talks which were not recorded. Our talk was recorded and is available here.

GCC 9 Drops Support For Older ARM Microarchitecture Versions

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GNU

Next year's GCC 9 compiler release will be eliminating support for older ARM versions.

Fortunately, ARMv7 and newer is still in great shape given they are still common and even ARMv6 support is also still supported by the GNU Compiler Collection. But as of Friday they dropped support for ARMv3 and older followed by dropping ARMv5 and ARMv5E.

The dropping of ARMv3 and older even includes finally eliminating the support for ARM2. The ARM2 target in GCC is finally no more.

This doesn't come as too much of a surprise though with pre-ARMv4T support being deprecated since GCC 6 and the ARMv5 support being deprecated since GCC 7 last year.

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Also: Announcing git-cinnabar 0.5.0 beta 3

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

SparkyLinux 5.4 GameOver, Multimedia, and Rescue Special Editions Are Out Now

Released last week on June 11, 2018, the SparkyLinux 5.4 "Nibiru" rolling release operating system was available only as LXQt, MinimalGUI, and MinimalCLI editions. Today, the project launches three more editions, namely GameOver, Multimedia, and Rescue. "New live/install ISO images of special editions of SparkyLinux 5.4 "Nibiru": GameOver, Multimedia & Rescue are out. Sparky 5 follows the rolling release model and is based on Debian testing branch "Buster"," reads today's announcement. Read more

KDE Plasma 5.13 Desktop Environment Gets First Point Release, over 20 Bugs Fixed

The KDE Plasma 5.13 desktop environment launched a week ago as the best release of the acclaimed desktop designed for GNU/Linux distributions, introducing new lock and login screens, redesigned system settings, Plasma Browser Integration, Plasma Discover enhancements, and many other improvements and changes. Now, users can update their KDE Plasma 5.13 installations to the first point release, KDE Plasma 5.13.1, which brings more than 20 bug fixes across various components, such as Plasma Discover, Plasma Add-ons, Plasma Desktop, Plasma Networkmanager (plasma-nm), KWin, and KDE Hotkeys. Read more

Qt 5.11.1 Released

I am pleased to announce that Qt 5.11.1 is released today. As a patch release Qt 5.11.1 does not add any new functionality, but provides important bug fixes and other improvements. New Qt 5.11.1 is first patch release for Qt 5.11 series. There are fixes for over 150 bugs and it contains more than 700 changes compared to Qt 5.11.0. For details of the most important changes, please check the Change files of Qt 5.11.1. And don’t worry if some fix is missing from new Qt5.11.1 release; we are planning to release Qt 5.11.2 at the beginning of September. Read more Also: Qt 5.11.1 Released With 150+ Bug Fixes