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Red Hat

Red Hat News, Scientific Linux, and Fedora 29 Dropping GCC From Their Default Build Root

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  • Red Hat OpenStack platform adopted by Fujitsu

    Red Hat recently announced that Fujitsu has adopted Red Hat OpenStack Platform as an Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) component of Fujitsu Cloud Service for OSS, its global hybrid cloud service offering.

    As a backbone for an open hybrid cloud, Fujitsu Cloud Service for OSS is designed to help enterprises more quickly develop cloud-native and traditional applications and services in an environment built from innovative, more reliable, and more secure open technologies.

    This announcement shows the continued, long-standing collaboration between Red Hat and Fujitsu to offer hybrid cloud solutions based on open source.

  • Fujitsu Adopts Red Hat OpenStack Platform for Fujitsu Cloud Service for OSS
  • Entando Announces OEM Agreement with Red Hat on Modern Applications

    Entando, a leader in open source Digital Experience Platforms, today announced that Red Hat has agreed to include access to a set of Entando’s open source low-code tools as part of Red Hat’s newly launched Red Hat Process Automation Manager. Entando has optimized the tools to run effectively on Red Hat Process Automation Manager. Together, these technologies offer customers expanded next-generation business process automation capabilities native to Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform and a user experience (UX) designed to help them create cloud-native applications faster.

  • STT Connect builds webscale private cloud infrastructure on Red Hat

    To build its cloud on a flexible, supported open source platform, STT Connect partnered with Red Hat to deploy Red Hat OpenStack Platform, Red Hat Ansible Tower, and other enterprise Red Hat software.

    These solutions helped the company create an agile and efficient — yet secure — webscale cloud infrastructure. STT Connect became the first cloud company in Singapore to achieve the highest level Multi-Tier Cloud Security (MTCS) certification with an OpenStack private cloud.

  • The Final Build of Scientific Linux 6.10 Legacy Branch Released

    Scientific Linux has announced that the 6.10 release will be the final build of their legacy branch based on Red Hat 6.10. It will only receive security updates and major bug fixes and will be supported until November 2020.

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) co-develop Scientific Linux with the aim of creating a stable operating system that is supplied with packages and applications that support scientific research. They also list using “the free exchange of ideas, designs, and implementations to prepare a computing platform for the next generation of scientific computing” as one of their goals.

  • ISVs in APAC Showcase Increased Red Hat OpenShift Adoption Across Verticals
  • Should You Buy Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) or Marsh & McLennan Companies, Inc. (MMC)?
  • Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) P/E ratio is noted at 62.01
  • Is this stock Risky for You?: Red Hat, Inc. (RHT)
  • Analyst Buzz: Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)
  • Red Hat: Ready For Multiple Expansion
  • Fedora 29 Dropping GCC From Their Default Build Root Has Been Causing A Heated Debate

    One of the surprisingly controversial changes being implemented for Fedora 29 is dropping GCC and GCC-C++ from the default BuildRoot for assembling Fedora packages with Koji and Mock.

    Up to now it's always just been implied that GCC (including the GCC C++ compiler) is there by default with every build-root. But these days with more packages being written in languages like Go, Rust, Python, Node.js, and other modern languages, the proportion of C/C++ applications is decreasing. As such, the GCC C/C++ support is no longer being implied with the default build environments in Koji/Mock, which in turn should help package build times for non-C/C++ packages as they will no longer need to pull in the gcc/gcc-c++ packages and in turn a cleaner buildroot environment too.

Hiding the Fedora boot menu

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The venerable Linux boot menu has made its appearance at boot time since the days when LILO was the standard boot loader, through the days of GRUB, and onward to today's GRUB 2 and others. It is sometimes configured out by distributions as something that will potentially confuse less-technical users, but it has been a mainstay of Fedora for many releases. A recent proposal to hide the menu, starting in Fedora 29, has met a mixed reaction, but those who are not in favor are also those most able to revert to the existing behavior.

Hans de Goede raised the issue back at the end of May. He suggested that Fedora had at one time hidden the boot menu, but changed. As a longtime Fedora user, I don't remember that switch, but my memory is faulty and that may be the case here. In any case, De Goede's idea is to not have the distribution print any confusing messages at boot time: "the end goal being a user pressing the on button and then going to the graphical login manager without him seeing any text messages / menus filled with technical jargon."

The response was somewhat mixed, as might be expected. Stephen Gallagher was concerned about boots that failed and gave the user no alternatives to try. De Goede said that the plan was to detect failed boots and then show the boot menu on the next boot. He muddied the waters somewhat by mentioning a "fastboot" feature that he is planning for Fedora 30. It would effectively provide no way for a user sitting at the console to override the boot sequence (with a key press, say) and get the boot menu once the system has started booting.

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Also: Fedora tackles Southeast Linux Fest 2018

Red Hat News, Mostly APAC

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Red Hat News

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  • Red Hat targets regional system integrators through program launch

    Red Hat has launched an Asia Pacific (APAC) program targeted at helping system integrators (SIs) build and modernise applications for the cloud.

    The new initiative is designed to allow partners to deliver new services at a lower cost and accelerate development for faster return on investment.

    Specifically, the Red Hat OpenShift Practice Builder Program has been designed to do just that, using the vendor's container application platform, Openshift, and a portfolio of enterprise-class application and integration middleware software products, JBoss Middleware.

  • Virtualize your OpenStack control plane with Red Hat Virtualization and Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13

    With the release of Red Hat OpenStack Platform 13 (Queens) we’ve added support to Red Hat OpenStack Platform director to deploy the overcloud controllers as virtual machines in a Red Hat Virtualization cluster. This allows you to have your controllers, along with other supporting services such as Red Hat Satellite, Red Hat CloudForms, Red Hat Ansible Tower, DNS servers, monitoring servers, and of course, the undercloud node (which hosts director), all within a Red Hat Virtualization cluster. This can reduce the physical server footprint of your architecture and provide an extra layer of availability.

    Please note: this is not using Red Hat Virtualization as an OpenStack hypervisor (i.e. the compute service, which is already nicely done with nova via libvirt and KVM) nor is this about hosting the OpenStack control plane on OpenStack compute nodes.

  • ORock Technologies Achieves FedRAMP Moderate Authorization for ORockCloud

    As a Red Hat Premier Certified Cloud and Service Provider (CCSP), ORock Technologies architected ORockCloud as a "pure-play" Red Hat cloud that incorporates a suite of Red Hat's open source solutions for enhanced flexibility, security features and control. These include: Red Hat Enterprise Linux; Red Hat OpenStack Platform; Red Hat Virtualization; Red Hat Ceph Storage; Red Hat CloudForms; Red Hat Ansible Tower; Red Hat Satellite; and associated cloud APIs.

  • Will Investors Step Up in Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) and Chubb Limited (CB)?
  • Here’s What To Do With Red Hat, Inc. (RHT), EQT Corporation (EQT)

Red Hat News: Security, Celebrating Red Hat’s 25th Anniversary and More

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  • Red Hat Security: Red Hat’s disclosure process

    Last week, a vulnerability (CVE-2018-10892) that affected CRI-O, Buildah, Podman, and Docker was made public before some affected upstream projects were notified. We regret that this was not handled in a way that lives up to our own standards around responsible disclosure. It has caused us to look back to see what went wrong so as to prevent this from happening in the future.

    Because of how important our relationships with the community and industry partners are and how seriously we treat non-public information irrespective of where it originates, we are taking this event as an opportunity to look internally at improvements and challenge assumptions we have held.

    We conducted a review and are using this to develop training around the handling of non-public information relating to security vulnerabilities, and ensuring that our relevant associates have a full understanding of the importance of engaging with upstreams as per their, and our, responsible disclosure guidelines. We are also clarifying communication mechanisms so that our associates are aware of the importance of and methods for notifying upstream of a vulnerability prior to public disclosure.

  • Celebrating Red Hat’s 25th anniversary: Red Hat partners have played an important role in our company journey

    As Red Hat celebrates 25 years, I would be remiss not to mention the role Red Hat partners have played in our company’s story. Partners have been an important multiplier for Red Hat and building our customer success. They are important to our future.

  • DH2i signs strategic-alignment agreement with Red Hat

    DH2i Co., a Fort Collins-based company that provides disaster-recovery solutions for Windows, Linux and Oracle databases, has signed a strategic-alignment agreement with Red Hat.

    After testing and validation, DH2i will become a Red Hat Technology Partner and has been certified on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.

  • How Financially Strong Is Red Hat Inc (NYSE:RHT)?
  • What is the fate of Red Hat, Inc. (RHT) against Blue Apron Holdings, Inc. (APRN),

Red Hat News

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Red Hat: APAC, Kubernetes, Raleigh and More

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Scientific Linux 6.10 RC 1

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  • Scientific Linux 6.10 RC 1 i386/x86_64 is now available for testing
  • CentOS 6.10 Released, Scientific Linux 6.10 Coming Next Week

    Based off last month's Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.10 update, CentOS 6.10 is available this week while also the Scientific Linux 6.10 release candidate has also been made available.

    Released on Tuesday was the CentOS 6.10 release. This CentOS 6 update is derived from the same sources as RHEL 6.10.

    As such, like with upstream RHEL 6.10, this new release offers Retpolines and KPTI support for Spectre and Meltdown mitigation. Besides security update work, there are also updates to GCC and other system packages. But all in all, not much is happening for EL6 due to the time around on the market it's mostly just receiving security updates and important fixes. Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 remains their prime focus and prepping the yet-to-be-released Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.

Fedora 28 KDE - Call the doctor, it's not feeling well

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Reviews

I didn't get to test a lot of things - apps, hardware compatibility, performance, whatnot, but then, there's really no reason to persist. This is a failing distro, like so many others released recently. No validation, no care, nothing. Just random code. A lackluster showing with no pride or passion or quality. Fedora 28 KDE did give me media playback, but that's about the only thing that worked fine. The rest was all broken. Customization wasn't smooth, the fonts are meh, no smartphone support, mediocre network support, and then, a dead desktop after trying to install Nvidia drivers the same way that worked just fine in Fedora 27. Madness.

If you want to use Fedora for some reason, the Gnome edition is better, but it's still a rather average product and not suitable for day-to-say use. A steady decline since version 25, and I'm 100% sure this is all the result of the carefree approach to software development, the rapid release mania and the total disregard to validation and user needs. This one is a total flop. And I've just wasted a day and a half of my life. We're done.

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Also: Call for Fedora Women’s Day 2018 proposals

Red Hat Leftovers

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Red Hat News

Debian: Google Summer of Code, Debian 9.5, and Tails

  • Google Summer of Code with a Debian Project
    Yes! My project proposal was selected. First of all I want to mention that I began my open source adventure with Debian. I started to participate in the open source events like Hackathons, BSP and Conferences and doing small contribution to different projects and this is how everything started.
  • Debian 9.5 Released: “Rock Solid” GNU/Linux Distro Arrives With Spectre v2 Fix
    Following the fourth point release of Debian 9 “stretch” in March, the developers of the popular GNU/Linux distro have shipped the latest update to its stable distribution. For those who don’t know, Debian 9 is an LTS version that’ll remain supported for 5 years. As one would expect, this point release doesn’t bring any set of new features and keeps focusing on improving an already stable experience by delivering security patches and bug fixes. In case you’re looking for an option that brings new features, you can check out the recently released Linux Mint 19.
  • Your Help Is Needed to Test VeraCrypt Support in the Tails Anonymous OS, GNOME
    The team behind the famous Tails operating system, also known as the Amnesic Incognito Live System or simply Anonymous OS, needs your help to test the integration of the VeraCrypt disk encryption software. In an attempt to provide Tails users with better security, the team is working hard these days on the integration of the VeraCrypt open-source and free disk encryption utility used for on-the-fly encryption of encrypted disk drives into the next-generation Tails OS as well as the GNOME desktop environment it uses by default. This will let Tails users easily unlock encrypted volumes on-the-fly when using the anonymous live system to stay hidden online while protecting their identity and privacy. To makes things even easier, they created the VeraCrypt Mounter utility for unlocking VeraCrypt encrypted drives.

Programming: Perl, RcppClassic, Git-cinnabar, Effective Python

  • Confessions of a recovering Perl hacker
    My name's MikeCamel, and I'm a Perl hacker. There, I've said it. That's the first step. My handle on IRC, Twitter and pretty much everywhere else in the world is "MikeCamel." This is because, back in the day, when there were no chat apps—no apps at all, in fact—I was in a technical "chatroom" and the name "Mike" had been taken. I looked around, and the first thing I noticed on my desk was the Camel Book, the O'Reilly Perl Bible. I have the second edition now, but this was the first edition. Yesterday, I happened to pick up the second edition, the really thick one, to show someone on a video conference call, and it had a thin layer of dust on it. I was a little bit ashamed, but a little bit relieved as well.
  • RcppClassic 0.9.11
    A new maintenance release, now at version 0.9.11, of the RcppClassic package arrived earlier today on CRAN. This package provides a maintained version of the otherwise deprecated initial Rcpp API which no new projects should use as the normal Rcpp API is so much better.
  • Mike Hommey: Announcing git-cinnabar 0.5.0 beta 4
    Git-cinnabar is a git remote helper to interact with mercurial repositories. It allows to clone, pull and push from/to mercurial remote repositories, using git.
  • Russ Allbery: Review: Effective Python