Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Debian

Debian in Events: Reproducible Builds and X2Go

Filed under
Debian
  • Chris Lamb: Review: The "Trojan Room" coffee

    I was recently invited to give a seminar at the Cambridge University's Department of Computer Science and Technology on the topic of Reproducible Builds.

  • Results produced while at "X2Go - The Gathering 2018" in Stuttgart

    Over the last weekend, I have attended the FLOSS meeting "X2Go - The Gathering 2018" [1]. The event took place at the shackspace make spacer in Ulmerstraße near S-Bahn station S-Untertürckheim. Thanks to the people from shackspace for hosting us there, I highly enjoyed your location's environment. Thanks to everyone who joined us at the meeting. Thanks to all event sponsors (food + accomodation for me). Thanks to Stefan Baur for being our glorious and meticulous organizer!!!

    Thanks to my family for letting me go for that weekend.

    Especially, a big thanks to everyone, that I was allowed to bring our family dog "Capichera" with me to the event. While Capichera adapted quite ok to this special environment on sunny Friday and sunny Saturday, he was not really feeling well on rainy Sunday (aching joints, unwilling to move, walk interact).

Updated Debian 9: 9.6 released

Filed under
Debian

The Debian project is pleased to announce the sixth update of its stable distribution Debian 9 (codename stretch). This point release mainly adds corrections for security issues, along with a few adjustments for serious problems. Security advisories have already been published separately and are referenced where available.

Please note that the point release does not constitute a new version of Debian 9 but only updates some of the packages included. There is no need to throw away old stretch media. After installation, packages can be upgraded to the current versions using an up-to-date Debian mirror.

Those who frequently install updates from security.debian.org won't have to update many packages, and most such updates are included in the point release.

New installation images will be available soon at the regular locations.

Read more

Fedora Community and Debian Work

Filed under
Red Hat
Debian

Debian Package Analysis and More

Filed under
Debian

Init system support in Debian

Filed under
Debian

The "systemd question" has roiled Debian multiple times over the years, but things had mostly been quiet on that front of late. The Devuan distribution is a Debian derivative that has removed systemd; many of the vocal anti-systemd Debian developers have switched, which helps reduce the friction on the Debian mailing lists. But that seems to have led to support for init system alternatives (and System V init in particular) to bitrot in Debian. There are signs that a bit of reconciliation between Debian and Devuan will help fix that problem.

The Devuan split was acrimonious, much like the systemd "debate" that preceded it. Many bits were expended in describing the new distribution as a waste of time (or worse), while the loudest Devuan proponents declared that systemd would cause the end of Debian and Linux as a whole. Over time, that acrimony has mostly been reduced to random potshots (on both sides); there is clearly no love lost between the pro and anti sides (whether those apply to systemd, Devuan, or both). Some recent developments have shown that perhaps a bit of thawing in relations is underway—that can only be a good thing for both sides and the community as a whole.

Holger Levsen alerted the debian-devel mailing list that the Debian "Buster" (i.e. Debian 10) release was in danger of shipping with only partial support for running without systemd. The problem is that two packages needed for running with System V init (sysvinit-core and systemd-shim) are not really being maintained. The shim is completely unmaintained and sysvinit-core has been languishing even though it has two maintainers listed.

Read more

Debian Developers

Filed under
Debian
  • Neil McGovern: GNOME ED update – October

    As per usual, our main focus has been on the hiring of new staff members for the Foundation. We’ve completed a few second interviews and a couple of first interviews. We’re aiming to start making offers around the end of November. If you have put in an application, and haven’t heard back in a while, please don’t worry! It’s simply due to a large number of people who’ve applied and the very manual way we’ve had to process these. Everyone should hear back.

    We’ve also had some interesting times with our banking. The short version is, we’ve moved banks to another provider. This has taken quite a bit of work, but hopefully, this should be settling down now.

  • New and improved Frikanalen Kodi addon version 0.0.3

    If you read my blog regularly, you probably know I am involved in running and developing the Norwegian TV channel Frikanalen. It is an open channel, allowing everyone in Norway to publish videos on a TV channel with national coverage. You can think of it as Youtube for national television. In addition to distribution on RiksTV and Uninett, Frikanalen is also available as a Kodi addon. The last few days I have updated the code to add more features. A new and improved version 0.0.3 Frikanalen addon was just made available via the Kodi repositories. This new version include a option to browse videos by category, as well as free text search in the video archive. It will now also show the video duration in the video lists, which were missing earlier. A new and experimental link to the HD video stream currently being worked on is provided, for those that want to see what the CasparCG output look like. The alternative is the SD video stream, generated using MLT. CasparCG is controlled by our mltplayout server which instead of talking to mlt is giving PLAY instructions to the CasparCG server when it is time to start a new program.

  • New Debian Developers and Maintainers (September and October 2018)

    The following contributors got their Debian Developer accounts in the last two months:

    Joseph Herlant (aerostitch)
    Aurélien Couderc (coucouf)
    Dylan Aïssi (daissi)
    Kunal Mehta (legoktm)
    Ming-ting Yao Wei (mwei)
    Nicolas Braud-Santoni (nicoo)
    Pierre-Elliott Bécue (peb)
    Stephen Gelman (ssgelm)
    Daniel Echeverry (epsilon)
    Dmitry Bogatov (kaction)

    The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months:

    Sagar Ippalpalli
    Kurt Kremitzki
    Michal Arbet
    Daniel Pocock
    Peter Wienemann
    Alexis Bienvenüe
    Gard Spreemann

    Congratulations!

Intel and Debian Work Politics

Filed under
Debian
  • Now Intel signs up to open-source code of conduct after Torvalds' Linux hiatus

    Intel's open-source projects have now committed to the widely-adopted Contributor Covenant, a code of conduct that was recently taken up by Linux, following Linus Torvalds' brief break to reflect on his insensitive treatment of other kernel developers.

  • Debian Project announces quarterly anti-harassment transparency reports

    Martin Ferrari from the Debian anti-harassment team has announced that they’re going to be releasing transparency reports to the project’s mailing list. The team, which currently consists of Laura Arjona Reina, Martin Ferrari, and Molly de Blanc, is responsible for ensuring that project members abide by the project’s diversity statement and two code of conduct documents (1, 2).

Debian Monthly Reports and Miscellany

Filed under
Debian
  • Paul Wise: FLOSS Activities October 2018
  • Ben Hutchings: Debian LTS work, October 2018
  • Time for an official MIME type for patches?

    As part of my involvement in the Nikita archive API project, I've been importing a fairly large lump of emails into a test instance of the archive to see how well this would go. I picked a subset of my notmuch email database, all public emails sent to me via @lists.debian.org, giving me a set of around 216 000 emails to import. In the process, I had a look at the various attachments included in these emails, to figure out what to do with attachments, and noticed that one of the most common attachment formats do not have an official MIME type registered with IANA/IETF. The output from diff, ie the input for patch, is on the top 10 list of formats included in these emails. At the moment people seem to use either text/x-patch or text/x-diff, but neither is officially registered. It would be better if one official MIME type were registered and used everywhere.

Debian: Idea for a Debian QA, Salsa Ribbons, and Raphaël Hertzog's LTS Work

Filed under
Debian
  • Idea for a Debian QA service: monitoring install size with dependencies

    This is an idea. I don't have the time to work on it myself, but I thought I'd throw it out in case someone else finds it interesting.

    When you install a Debian package, it pulls in its dependencies and recommended packages, and those pull in theirs. For simple cases, this is all fine, but sometimes there's surprises. Installing mutt to a base system pulls in libgpgme, which pulls in gnupg, which pulls in a pinentry package, which can pull in all of GNOME. Or at least people claim that.

  • Chris Lamb: Salsa ribbons

    Salsa is the name of the collaborative development server for Debian GNU/Linux and is the replacement for the now-deprecated Alioth service.

    To make it easier to show the world that you use Salsa, I've created a number of Github-esque ribbons that you can overlay on your projects' sites by copying & pasting the appropriate snippet into your HTML.

  • Raphaël Hertzog: Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, September 2018

Raspberry Pi lookalike offers HDMI 2.0 and optional M.2

Filed under
Android
Debian
Ubuntu

Geniatech’s “XPI-S905X” is a new Raspberry Pi pseudo clone with a quad -A53 Amlogic S905X plus 2GB RAM, up to 16GB eMMC, 4K-ready HDMI 2.0, LAN, 4x USB, touch-enabled LVDS, and optional M.2.

Geniatech, which is known for Qualcomm based SBCs such as the Snapdragon 410 based, 96Boards-like Development Board IV and Snapdragon 820E based Development Board 8, has posted specs for a Raspberry Pi form factor board with a quad -A53, Amlogic S905X with 1/6GHz to 2GHz performance. No pricing is available for the XPI-S905X, which appears to be aimed at the OEM market.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Samsung Linux on DeX beta hands-on: do almost everything on your phone

Among the various Linux on Android implementations, Samsung’s Linux on DeX definitely looks the most polished ready to use solution, even if it’s still in beta form. Although it uses a two-year-old version of Ubuntu, there is already a lot that can be done from that. Plus, just like Android users, Linux users can be pretty creative and only time will tell if they’ll be able to use Linux on DeX to make almost any Linux distro work. Read more

Android Leftovers

A Look At The GCC 9 Performance On Intel Skylake Against GCC 8, LLVM Clang 7/8

With GCC 9 embarking upon its third stage of development where the focus ships to working on bug/regression fixes in preparation for releasing the GCC 9.1 stable compiler likely around the end of Q1'2019, here is a fresh look at the GCC 9 performance with its latest development code as of this week compared to GCC 8.2.0 stable while using an Intel Core i9 7980XE test system running Ubuntu Linux. For good measure are also fresh results from LLVM Clang 7.0 stable as well as LLVM Clang 8.0 SVN for the latest development state of that competing C/C++ open-source compiler. Read more

This under-$6 SBC runs Linux on RISC-V based C-SKY chip

Hangzhou C-SKY has launched a “C-SKY Linux Development Board” for $5.60 and up, featuring a RISC-V derived, 574MHz C-SKY GX6605S CK610M SoC, 64MB DDR2, an HDMI port, and 2x USB 2.0 ports. Last month, Hangzhou C-SKY Microsystems Co. announced Linux 4.20~5.0 kernel support for its new RISC-V based C-SKY CK810 SoC design. Now, Hangzhou C-SKY has launched a development board that runs Linux on a similar CK610M SoC. The C-SKY Linux Development Board sells for 39-40 Yuan ($5.60 to $7.05) on Taobao and $19.50 to $21.50 on AliExpress. Read more