Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Debian

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Filed under
Debian

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely.

Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers.

You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember.

Read more

antiX 17 Linux Operating System Gets New Alpha Build, Now Uses Kernel 4.9.6

Filed under
Linux
Debian

Debian-based antiX 17 Linux has recently entered development, and it today received a new Alpha build, the second in the upcoming series based on the soon-to-be-released Debian GNU/Linux 9 "Stretch" operating system.

Read more

Debian-Based Elive 2.8.0 Beta Distro Is Out with Performance Improvements, More

Filed under
Debian

Four months have passed since the release of Elive 2.7.8 Beta, and the developers of the Debian-based GNU/Linux distribution have announced today the availability of a new Beta version.

Read more

Univention Corporate Server 4.2 Enters Development Based on Debian 8 & Linux 4.9

Filed under
Linux
Debian

Univention's Maren Abatielos is informing Softpedia today, February 7, 2017, about the general availability of the first milestone towards the major Univention Corporate Server (UCS) 4.2 operating system.

Read more

Debian 9.0 Freeze and Outreachy Interns

Filed under
Debian
  • Bits from the Release Team: stretch is frozen
  • Debian GNU/Linux 9.0 "Stretch" Has Entered the Final Phase of Development

    Debian developer Jonathan Wiltshire announced earlier that the forthcoming Debian GNU/Linux 9.0 "Stretch" operating system has entered the final phase of development and is now officially frozen, as of February 5, 2017.

    Debian GNU/Linux 9.0 "Stretch" will be the next major release of the acclaimed Debian GNU/Linux operating system, and it is currently being developed under the Debian Testing umbrella, which users can easily deploy on their systems if they want to become early adopters or just help with the testing.

  • Debian 9.0 Stretch Is Now Frozen

    Debian 9.0 "Stretch" is now frozen for its anticipated release later this year.

    Under Debian's freeze policy, packages still allowed to land are those with targeted fixes, fixes for important bugs, and translation updates and documentation fixes.

  • Debian welcomes its Outreachy interns

    Better late than never, we'd like to welcome our three Outreachy interns for this round, lasting from the 6th of December 2016 to the 6th of March 2017.

Debian Developmnt News

Filed under
Debian
  • The stretch freeze is coming

    The soft freeze has been on going for almost a month now and the full stretch freeze will start tomorrow night (UTC). It has definitely been visible in the number of unblock requests that we have received so far. Fortunately, we are no where near the rate of the jessie freeze. At the moment, all unblock requests are waiting for the submitter (either for a clarification or an upload).

  • My Monthly Update for January 2017

    It has been a quiet start to the year due to work keeping me very busy. Most of my spare time (when not sitting shattered on the sofa) was spent resurrecting my old website from backups. My son had plenty of visitors coming to visit as well, which prompted me to restart work on my model railway in the basement. Last year I received a whole heap of track, and also a tunnel formation from a friend at work. I managed to finish the supporting structure for the tunnel, and connect one end of it to the existing track layout. The next step (which will be a bit harder) is to connect the other end of the tunnel into the existing layout. The basement is one of the favourite things for me to keep my son and his friends occupied when there is a visit. The railway and music studio are very popular with the little guests.

  • My Free Software Activities in January 2017

    Welcome to gambaru.de. Here is my monthly report that covers what I have been doing for Debian. If you’re interested in Java, Games and LTS topics, this might be interesting for you.

Leftovers: Debian, Ubuntu and Derivatives

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Tails 3.0 will require a 64-bit processor

    Tails 3.0 will require a 64-bit x86-64 compatible processor. As opposed to older versions of Tails, it will not work on 32-bit processors.

    We have waited for years until we felt it was the right time to do this switch. Still, this was a hard decision for us to make. Today, we want to explain why we eventually made this decision, how it will affect users, and when.

  • [Video] Ubuntu Testing Day - Ubuntu Core and QEMU
  • [Video] Ubuntu Unity 8 - Phone, Tablet, Desktop
  • Conky Alternative Weather Widget "Cumulus" Available For Ubuntu/Linux Mint

    We have many conky versions with super easy installation, you can check conky collection. Cumulus is a free, open source and elegant weather widget for Ubuntu, based on Stormcloud, It was formerly known as 'Typhoon', it stays on the desktop just like conky. Unlike conky it offers customization which includes weather metrics 'Celsius' 'Fahrenheit' 'Kelvin' and 'mph' 'kph' 'm/s', and widget color can be changed directly from settings, depending on user needs. It can be setup to show in all Workspaces, we will show you below how to setup.

  • Looking for Swami Control Panel Testers

    Last time I really talked about our control panel rewrite for Moksha, Swami, was over a year ago. Because last year was a new major release, most of my Bodhi team went into preparing that and making sure it was functional (we are just volunteers after all). This year however, not only do we not have a major release to work on, but I am traveling less for work. This gives me a bit more time to work on Bodhi related things. Today I am happy to share there is a new version of Swami in the repositories ready for some testing. It contains four modules:

Tails and 64-bit Processors

Filed under
Security
Debian
  • Next major Tails release will require a 64-bit processor

    The popular Linux distribution, Tails OS, carries the following slogan on its website “privacy for anyone anywhere”. It seems, though, following some of the latest news from the project, this slogan isn’t exactly true. Beginning with Tails 3.0, users will need a 64-bit processor powering their computer.

  • Privacy-focused Linux-based operating system Tails 3.0 will drop 32-bit processor support

    If you find yourself needing an operating system that respects your privacy, you cannot go wrong with Tails. The live Linux-distro can be run from a DVD which is read-only, meaning there is less of a chance of files being left behind. Heck, Edward Snowden famously used it to protect himself when shining a light on the overreaching US government.

    Unfortunately for some users, Tails will soon not work on their computers. The upcoming version 3.0 of the operating system is dropping 32-bit processor support. While a decline in compatibility is normally a bad thing, in this case, it is good. You see, because there are so few 32-bit Tails users, the team was wasting resources by supporting them. Not to mention, 64-bit processors are more secure too.

Debian and Ubuntu

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian Fun in January 2017
  • First Tails beta release based on Stretch

    Today, I have released the first beta for Tails 3.0, that will be the first version of Tails based on Debian 9 (Stretch).

    Our automated test suite pretends it works pretty well and matches our safety expectations. I'm inclined to trust it. But as we learned after porting Tails to Squeeze, Wheezy and Jessie: quick, exploratory testing of pre-releases will not identify all the remaining regressions.

  • Mir Display Server Lands API Changes, Relicenses Headers To LGPL

    Canonical's Mir developers are working to get Mir 1.0 released in 2017 and in preparation for that stable milestone they have just landed a number of API changes.

    Just a few days ago we were talking about the Mir 0.26 features while the latest Mir happenings is a number of API changes. Today there were a number of new APIs published for the Mir client library, the Mir render surface APIs were deprecated, and other API changes.

Tails 3.0 Anonymous Live OS Enters Beta, Ships with Linux 4.9 and GNOME 3.22

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

A week ago, we introduced our readers to the Tails 2.10 anonymous live system based on the Debian GNU/Linux operating system and designed for those who want to stay invisible online and keep their anonymity.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux Mint 18.1 Is The Best Mint Yet

The hardcore Linux geeks won’t read this article. They’ll skip right past it… They don’t like Linux Mint much. There’s a good reason for them not to; it’s not designed for them. Linux Mint is for folks who want a stable, elegant desktop operating system that they don’t want to have to constantly tinker with. Anyone who is into Linux will find Mint rather boring because it can get as close to the bleeding edge of computer technology. That said, most of those same hardcore geeks will privately tell you that they’ve put Linux Mint on their Mom’s computer and she just loves it. Linux Mint is great for Mom. It’s stable, offers everything she needs and its familiar UI is easy for Windows refugees to figure out. If you think of Arch Linux as a finicky, high-performance sports car then Linux Mint is a reliable station wagon. The kind of car your Mom would drive. Well, I have always liked station wagons myself and if you’ve read this far then I guess you do, too. A ride in a nice station wagon, loaded with creature comforts, cold blowing AC, and a good sound system can be very relaxing, indeed. Read more

Make Gnome 3 more accessible for everyday use

Gnome 3 is a desktop environment that was created to fix a problem that did not exist. Much like PulseAudio, Wayland and Systemd, it's there to give developers a job, while offering no clear benefit over the original problem. The Gnome 2 desktop was fast, lithe, simple, and elegant, and its replacement is none of that. Maybe the presentation layer is a little less busy and you can search a bit more quickly, but that's about as far as the list of advantages goes, which is a pretty grim result for five years of coding. Despite my reservation toward Gnome 3, I still find it to be a little bit more suitable for general consumption than in the past. Some of the silly early decisions have been largely reverted, and a wee bit more sane functionality added. Not enough. Which is why I'd like to take a moment or three to discuss some extra tweaks and changes you should add to this desktop environment to make it palatable. Read more

When to Use Which Debian Linux Repository

Nothing distinguishes the Debian Linux distribution so much as its system of package repositories. Originally organized into Stable, Testing, and Unstable, additional repositories have been added over the years, until today it takes more than a knowledge of a repository's name to understand how to use it efficiently and safely. Debian repositories are installed with a section called main that consists only of free software. However, by editing the file /etc/apt/sources.list, you can add contrib, which contains software that depends on proprietary software, and non-free, which contains proprietary software. Unless you choose to use only free software, contrib and non-free are especially useful for video and wireless drivers. You should also know that the three main repositories are named for characters from the Toy Story movies. Unstable is always called Sid, while the names of Testing and Stable change. When a new version of Debian is released, Testing becomes Stable, and the new version of Testing receives a name. These names are sometimes necessary for enabling a mirror site, but otherwise, ignoring these names gives you one less thing to remember. Read more

Today in Techrights