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Debian Celebrates Its 24th Birthday

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Debian

Yesterday marked GNOME turning 20 while today Debian developers and users have its 24th birthday of the project to celebrate.

It was this day in 1993 that the late Ian Murdock founded the Debian Project. It's on 16 August each year that the birthday is celebrated, also known as Debian Day or Debian Appreciation Day by its creators and fans.

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GNOME and Debian: Debian Turning 24, GNOME Turning 20

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GNOME
Debian
  • Debian Celebrates Its 24th Birthday

    Yesterday marked GNOME turning 20 while today Debian developers and users have its 24th birthday of the project to celebrate.

  • GNOME desktop environment for Linux and BSD is 20 years old today

    When many people think of Linux, they incorrectly assume it is an operating system. Actually, Linux is merely the kernel which many operating systems leverage. An actual operating system is compromised of many things, including a user interface -- after all, users need to interface with their computer!

    Most computer users will obviously want a graphical UI nowadays, and for BSD and Linux-based operating systems there are many such desktop environments from which to choose. One of the most popular environments is GNOME. Not only is GNOME a DE, but it has evolved into much more, such as a collection of apps and design rules (Human Interface Guidelines). Today, GNOME is celebrating a very important milestone -- it is an impressive 20 years old!

  • Happy birthday, GNOME!

    The GNOME desktop turns 20 today, and I'm so excited! Twenty years is a major milestone for any open source software project, especially a graphical desktop environment like GNOME that has to appeal to many different users. The 20th anniversary is definitely something to celebrate!

  • Linux desktop GUI GNOME celebrates its 20th birthday

    By 1997, there had long been graphical Unix and Linux graphical user interface (GUI) desktops, but none of them had gathered much support. KDE, which was destined to become a major desktop, had started in 1996, but it was still facing opposition for its use of the Qt license. The GNOME Project, founded by Miguel de Icaza and Federico Mena Quintero on August 15, 1997, was created to build a GUI without the use of any non-General Public License (GPL) software. Thus, a struggle began between the two Linux desktops, which continues to this day.

Debian: Debconf17 and Reproducible Builds

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Debian
  • Consensually doing things together?

    I’d like to explore what motivates one to start a project and what motivates one to keep maintaining it. What are the energy levels required to manage bits of Debian as the project keeps growing. How easy it is to say no. Whether we have roles in Debian that require irreplaceable heroes to keep them going. What could be done to make life easier for heroes, easy enough that mere mortals can help, or take their place.

  • @DebConf17: Ad-hoc BoF: Debian for the Remote Desktop

    On Thursday at DebConf17, all people interested in using this or that Remote Desktop solution on Debian (as a server, as a client, as both) came together for a BoF.

  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #119

    29 package reviews have been added, 72 have been updated and 151 have been removed in this week, adding to our knowledge about identified issues.

  • "packages should build reproducibly" - after 4 years this work of many is in debian-policy now

    Four years ago Lunar held a BoF at DebConf13 which started the initiative in Debian. I only got involved in September 2014 with setting up continuous tests, rebuilding each package twice with some variations and then comparing the results using diffoscope, which back then was still called debbindiff and which we renamed as part of our efforts to make Reproducible Builds the norm in Free Software.

  • Debconf17

    I gave a talk entitled “Patterns for Testing Debian Packages”, in which I presented a collection of 7 patterns I documented while pushing the Debian Continuous Integration project, and were published in a 2016 paper. Video recording and a copy of the slides are available.

DebConf and Debian: DebConf17, DebConf18, Commons of Innovation, and DebCamp

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Debian
  • DebConf17 closes in Montreal and DebConf18 dates announced

    Next year, DebConf18 will be held in Hsinchu, Taiwan, from 29 July 2018 until 5 August 2018. It will be the first DebConf held in Asia. For the days before DebConf the local organisers will again set up DebCamp (21 July - 27 July), a session for some intense work on improving the distribution, and organise the Open Day on 28 July 2018, aimed at the general public.

    [...]

    Next year, DebConf18 will be held in Hsinchu, Taiwan, from 29 July 2018 until 5 August 2018. It will be the first DebConf held in Asia. For the days before DebConf the local organisers will again set up DebCamp (21 July - 27 July), a session for some intense work on improving the distribution, and organise the Open Day on 28 July 2018, aimed at the general public.

  • Debian: a Commons of Innovation

    I recently returned from Debconf. This year at Debconf, Matthew Garrett gave a talk about the next twenty years in free software. In his talk he raised concerns that Debian might not be relevant in that ecosystem and talked about some of the trends that contribute to his concerns.
    I was talking to Marga after the talk and she said that Debian used to be a lot more innovative than it is today.
    My initial reaction was doubt; what she said didn't feel right to me. At the time I didn't have a good answer. Since then I've been pondering the issue, and I think I have a partial answer to both Marga and Matthew and so I'll share it here.

  • Work for Debian and FLOSS I got done during DebCamp and DebConf... and Beyond...

Open-spec audio streaming SBC runs Linux on a 996MHz i.MX6 ULL

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OS
Linux
Debian

PolyVection’s “VoltaStream Zero” is an audio streaming SBC that runs Linux on a 996MHz i.MX6 ULL, and offers a TI PCM5121 DAC, TOSLINK, USB, and WiFi.

In 2013, Berlin based software developer Philip Voigt decided to build his own music streaming system. As detailed in this blog entry, Voight started with a Raspberry Pi, but decided it lacked the features he needed. He then tried working with a BeagleBone design, but found the board too complex and expensive — especially the prospect of duplicating the 6-layer PCB. Voight also evaluated several computer-on-module based designs, but after playing around with a vastly improved KiCAD PCB design and layout package, he decided to build an SBC from scratch.

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Debian-Based GParted Live 0.29.0-1 Adds Support for UDF File System, Linux 4.11

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Debian

GParted maintainer Curtis Gedak announced the release and immediate availability for download of GParted 0.29.0 open-source disk partitioning tool, as well as the corresponding GParted Live 0.29.0-1 distribution.

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Debian: DebConf 17 Coverage and New Tails

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Debian
  • unifying OS installation and configuration management

    Three years ago, I realized that propellor (my configuration management system that is configured using haskell) could be used as an installer for Debian (or other versions of Linux). In propellor is d-i 2.0, I guessed it would take "a month and adding a few thousand lines of code".

    I've now taken that month, and written that code, and I presented the result at DebConf yesterday. I demoed propellor building a live Debian installation image, and then handed it off to a volenteer from the audience to play with its visual user interface and perform the installation. The whole demo took around 20 minutes, and ended with a standard Debian desktop installation.

  • DebConf 17: Flatpak and Debian

    On Monday I gave a talk entitled “A Debian maintainer's guide to Flatpak”, aiming to introduce Debian developers to Flatpak, and show how Flatpak and Debian (and Debian derivatives like SteamOS) can help each other. It seems to have been quite well received, with people generally positive about the idea of using Flatpak to deliver backports and faster-moving leaf packages (games!) onto the stable base platform that Debian is so good at providing.

  • Urgent: Upgrade to Tails 3.1 ASAP! Serious security holes found in the Linux distro

    Apple recently removed some VPN clients from the App Store in China at the request of the Chinese Government. Why? That country is largely anti-privacy, and it does not want its citizens bypassing its censorship of the web. If you live in China, the government can decide what you can and can't view online. If you get caught circumventing these controls, the government can harshly punish you. Sad, right? This is why it is imperative that Linux-based privacy-centric open source operating systems such as Tails continue their development -- you never know when it might be needed (including in the USA).

Debian-Based Tails 3.1 Anonymous OS Debuts with Tor Browser 7.0.4, Linux 4.9.30

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Debian

Tails, the amnesic incognito live system, also known as the anonymous live operating system, has been updated today to version 3.1, a point release that fixes many security issues and updates important components.

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Debian and Ubuntu: DebConf17 Videos, From Unity to GNOME Shell, Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • DebConf17 first videos published

    Due to some technical issues, it took a slight bit longer than I'd originally expected; but the first four videos of the currently running DebConf 17 conference are available. Filenames are based on the talk title, so that should be reasonably easy to understand. I will probably add an RSS feed (like we've done for DebConf 16) to that place some time soon as well, but code for that still needs to be written.

  • A Small Unity Feature Missing in GNOME Shell [Video]

    A world of change is headed to Ubuntu as the distro switches from Unity to GNOME Shell. Long time Unity users accustomed to the workflow, feature set and quirks of Ubuntu’s incumbent releases will need to adapt to different ways of doing familiar things in its upcoming ones.

  • The Fridge: Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 515

    Welcome to the Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter. This is issue #515 for the week of August 1 – 7, 2017, and the full version is available here.

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GNOME and Debian: Debian Turning 24, GNOME Turning 20

  • Debian Celebrates Its 24th Birthday
    Yesterday marked GNOME turning 20 while today Debian developers and users have its 24th birthday of the project to celebrate.
  • GNOME desktop environment for Linux and BSD is 20 years old today
    When many people think of Linux, they incorrectly assume it is an operating system. Actually, Linux is merely the kernel which many operating systems leverage. An actual operating system is compromised of many things, including a user interface -- after all, users need to interface with their computer! Most computer users will obviously want a graphical UI nowadays, and for BSD and Linux-based operating systems there are many such desktop environments from which to choose. One of the most popular environments is GNOME. Not only is GNOME a DE, but it has evolved into much more, such as a collection of apps and design rules (Human Interface Guidelines). Today, GNOME is celebrating a very important milestone -- it is an impressive 20 years old!
  • Happy birthday, GNOME!
    The GNOME desktop turns 20 today, and I'm so excited! Twenty years is a major milestone for any open source software project, especially a graphical desktop environment like GNOME that has to appeal to many different users. The 20th anniversary is definitely something to celebrate!
  • Linux desktop GUI GNOME celebrates its 20th birthday
    By 1997, there had long been graphical Unix and Linux graphical user interface (GUI) desktops, but none of them had gathered much support. KDE, which was destined to become a major desktop, had started in 1996, but it was still facing opposition for its use of the Qt license. The GNOME Project, founded by Miguel de Icaza and Federico Mena Quintero on August 15, 1997, was created to build a GUI without the use of any non-General Public License (GPL) software. Thus, a struggle began between the two Linux desktops, which continues to this day.