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Debian

Review: Debian 10 "Buster"

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Debian

Debian is one of the world's oldest Linux distributions and, in terms of the number of developers involved, also one of the largest. Around 1,300 contributors worked on Debian 10, which was released on July 6th.

Debian 10 offers package upgrades across the entire operating system, but the main changes for this release include enabling AppArmor by default and running GNOME Shell on Wayland. (GNOME running on X.Org is available as an alternative desktop session.) The project's release announcement also mentions nftables can be used to manage the operating system's firewall and Secure Boot is enabled for some architectures. This version of Debian will receive a total of five years of support, thanks to the project's long-term support team.

The new version of Debian, codenamed "Buster", runs on over half a dozen CPU architectures and is available in net-install, full DVD install, and seven live desktop editions. This gives users many install options and avenues for trying the distribution. Though not mentioned in the distribution's release announcement Debian's media does not include non-free firmware which is often required to connect with wireless networks. People who need wireless networking have the option of downloading unofficial live images with non-free firmware.

Some more experimental users may be interested in knowing that Debian not only has a Linux flavour, but also offers builds with alternative kernels. The Debian GNU/Hurd team published new install media alongside the main Linux editions.

I ended up downloading the DVD install media, which is 3.6GB in size. I also downloaded the official live GNOME edition which is 2.3GB. My observations in this review come from installing and running Debian based on the install DVD media, unless otherwise specified.

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Septor Linux For Surfing Internet Anonymously

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Debian

Septor Linux is based on Debian, and uses Tor technologies to make users anonymous online. Septor 2019.4 has Linux kernel 4.19 and customized version of KDE Plasma 5.14.3.

If you do not know what Tor is, you can read this guide to know Tor in detail. But in short, Tor network transfers users requests through different other Tor clients used by people in other parts of the World which makes users completely anonymous. Due to this nature of transferring requests through many clients, it is also called the onion network.

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Debian Linux 10 'Buster' Places Stability Ahead of Excitement

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Linux
Reviews
Debian

If you are relatively new to using Linux, Debian's design decisions will not pose obstacles to using it. If you insist on speedier application updates, you might spend excessive time grabbing newer versions from .deb repositories that are outside Buster's reach.

Get Debian 10 Buster ISO downloads here.

You will have plenty of time to resolve those issues. The developers have a long slog to the release of Debian 11, aka "Bullseye."

I can only hope that the next Debian upgrade comes a lot closer to hitting an improved bull's-eye that is less boring.

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My Debian 10 (buster) Report

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Debian

In the early hours of Sunday morning (my time), Debian 10 (buster) was released. It’s amazing to be a part of an organisation where so many people work so hard to pull together and make something like this happen. Creating and supporting a stable release can be tedious work, but it’s essential for any kind of large-scale or long-term deployments. I feel honored to have had a small part in this release

My primary focus area for this release was to get Debian live images in a good shape. It’s not perfect yet, but I think we made some headway. The out of box experiences for the desktop environments on live images are better, and we added a new graphical installer that makes Debian easier to install for the average laptop/desktop user. For the bullseye release I intend to ramp up quality efforts and have a bunch of ideas to make that happen, but more on that another time.

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Tails 3.15 is out

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GNU
Linux
Security
Debian

This release fixes many security vulnerabilities. You should upgrade as soon as possible.

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Tiny compute modules crank up Snapdragon 845 and Snapdragon 660

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Android
Linux
Debian

Inforce announced two Micro SoMs with Android (and soon, Debian) BSPs running on octa-core Qualcomm SoCs. The Inforce 6701 showcases the high-end Snapdragon 845 while the Inforce 6502 taps the Snapdragon 660.

Inforce Computing unveiled a pair of Qualcomm Snapdragon based compute modules using the same 50 x 28mm Micro SoM form factor used in earlier products such as its Snapdragon 600-based Inforce 6401 and Snapdragon 820-based Inforce 6601. The new, Snapdragon 845-driven Inforce 6701 and Snapdragon 660-powered Inforce 6502 ship with BSPs for Android 9.0 Pie and Android 8.0 Oreo, respectively. Debian Linux BSPs are said to be “coming soon.”

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Debian vs. Ubuntu: The Similarities, Differences and Which One You Should Use

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Debian
Ubuntu

Ubuntu received a lot of love in its earlier releases. It made many seemingly complicated operations, easier for beginners just coming into the world of Linux-based distributions. But around the time the Unity interface was launched, it started to get some hate, too.

Objectively speaking, the interface was not good or bad, it did its job well. But it did it differently than what most people were used to. Then, some other changes, like inserting ads in the launch menu and changing the interface once again to Gnome, made some users dislike the distro even more and people began to look for alternatives, with one of them being Debian. Since Ubuntu is created from Debian, the two are very similar at the core. However, with the changes Canonical made to Debian to create Ubuntu, there are also a lot of differences, some of them subtle.

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Debian Edu / Skolelinux Buster — a complete Linux solution for your school

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GNU
Linux
Debian

Do you have to administrate a computer lab or a whole school network? Would you like to install servers, workstations and laptops which will then work together? Do you want the stability of Debian with network services already preconfigured? Do you wish to have a web-based tool to manage systems and several hundred or even more user accounts? Have you asked yourself if and how older computers could be used?

Then Debian Edu is for you. The teachers themselves or their technical support can roll out a complete multi-user multi-machine study environment within a few days. Debian Edu comes with hundreds of applications pre-installed, but you can always add more packages from Debian.

The Debian Edu developer team is happy to announce Debian Edu 10 Buster, the Debian Edu / Skolelinux release based on the Debian 10 Buster release. Please consider testing it and reporting back to help us to improve it further.

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Also: Debian GSoC Kotlin project blog: Week 4 & 5 Update

Debian 10 buster released

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Debian

After 25 months of development the Debian project is proud to present its new stable version 10 (code name buster), which will be supported for the next 5 years thanks to the combined work of the Debian Security team and of the Debian Long Term Support team.

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Also: Debian 10.0 "Buster" Now Available - Powered By Linux 4.19, GNOME + Wayland

Jonathan Wiltshire: What to expect on buster release day

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Debian

The ‘buster’ release day is today! This is mostly a re-hash of previous checklists, since we’ve done this a few times now and we have a pretty good rhythm.

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Android Leftovers

SysAdmin Day Sale: Get 60% off on Linux Foundation Certification & Training

To celebrate the Sysadmin day, the Linux Foundation is giving 60% off on its training courses on sysadmin, Kubernetes, Hyperledger etc. Advance your career with these certifications. Read more

Raspberry Pi 4 and Raspbian Buster: Hands-On

In my previous two posts I looked at the Raspberry Pi 4 hardware and at the procedure for installing and booting the new Raspbian Buster Operating System on the Pi 4. With those basic steps out of the way, now it's time to look at both the hardware and software in more detail. The first thing I want to mention is that when I wrote the previous post about Raspbian, I had not noticed that there is an updated version of Raspbian Buster (2019-07-10) available. This version was released sort of quietly (without the usual blog post announcing and explaining it), although there are release notes for it if you are interested. This release is extremely good news, because it fixes some of the biggest problems that I mentioned in my previous post... Read more