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Debian

Testing openSUSE, Manjaro, Debian, Fedora, and Mint Linux distributions on my new laptop

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Linux
Red Hat
Debian
SUSE

Due to the recent unfortunate demise of a couple of my computers I found myself in need of a new laptop on rather short notice. I found an Acer Aspire 5 on sale at about half price here in Switzerland, so I picked one up. I have been installing a number of Linux distributions on it, with mostly positive results.

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Debian and Ubuntu Leftovers

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Debian
Ubuntu
  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, December 2018

    Like each month, here comes a report about the work of paid contributors to Debian LTS.

  • CasparCG Server for TV broadcast playout in Debian

    The layered video playout server created by Sveriges Television, CasparCG Server, entered Debian today. This completes many months of work to get the source ready to go into Debian. The first upload to the Debian NEW queue happened a month ago, but the work upstream to prepare it for Debian started more than two and a half month ago. So far the casparcg-server package is only available for amd64, but I hope this can be improved. The package is in contrib because it depend on the non-free fdk-aac library. The Debian package lack support for streaming web pages because Debian is missing CEF, Chromium Embedded Framework. CEF is wanted by several packages in Debian. But because the Chromium source is not available as a build dependency, it is not yet possible to upload CEF to Debian. I hope this will change in the future.

  • Participate in Fedora Test Day Today, Netrunner Announces Netrunner 19.01 Blackbird, Security Patch for GNOME Bluetooth Tools in Ubuntu 18.04, New Giant Board SBC from Groboard and Linspire Posts Development Roadmap for 2019-2020

    Canonical yesterday released a security patch for the GNOME Bluetooth tools to address a security vulnerability with Ubuntu 18.04. Softpedia News reports that security researcher Chris Marchesi discovered the vulnerability in the BlueZ Linux Bluetooth stack, "which made it incorrectly handle disabling Bluetooth visibility, allowing a remote attacker to possibly pair to Bluetooth devices." All Ubuntu 18.04 LTS users should update immediately to the gnome-bluetooth 3.28.0-2ubuntu0.1 and libgnome-bluetooth13 3.28.0-2ubuntu0.1 packages from the official repos. See the wiki for detailed instructions.

  • Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 561

Debian-Based Netrunner 19.01 "Blackbird" Officially Released with New Dark Look

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Debian

Dubbed Blackbird, Netrunner 19.01 comes ten months after the Netrunner 18.03 "Idolon" release with a fresh, dark new look and feel with a more 3D-looking design, which was created using the Kvantum theme engine and the Alpha-Black Plasma theme. The new theme comes with some bling too as there's now a light glow for the "Minimize all Windows to show Desktop" function.

"Around this time of the year, we thought we could try something more vivid and colorful to lighten up the shortened days. So instead of going with the previously used “material look”, we thought of something different. Blackbird ships with a new Look and Feel Theme called “Netrunner Black” that is based on a dark, yet not too harsh contrasting visual," reads today's announcement.

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Also: Netrunner 19.01 – Blackbird released

Here's the Default Theme and Artwork for Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster"

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Debian

Created by Alex Makas, the "futurePrototype" artwork set was selected the winner of the artwork proposals for Debian GNU/Linux 10 "Buster" and will be used as the default theme for the upcoming operating system. The "futurePrototype" artwork set consists of a wallpaper, login theme with the Debian Buster logo, as well as a theme for the GRUB bootloader.

"After the Debian Desktop Team made the call for proposing themes, a total of eleven choices have been submitted, and any Debian contributor has received the opportunity to vote on them in a survey," said the Debian team in an announcement. "We received 3,646 responses ranking the different choices, and futurePrototype has been the winner among them."

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Upgrading Debian From Stable To Testing

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Debian

I reckon you've been a long time user of Debian stable and now wants to change some few aspects of your computer....oh wait! I mean huge aspects of your computer operating system. Now you want to upgrade to Debian testing because you'd like new features, get access to cool software, and importantly test that newly updated software too Wink Well, in that case, lucky you! I am happy to guide you on how to accomplish that on your computer. Moreover, if you are a total newbie to Debian operating system, don't worry, I've made sure to explain about basic stuff first so you can get a clear perspective on what the content of this topic is.

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Also: DocKnot 2.00

Debian: Freexian's Debian LTS, FreeRDP and SEPTOR Linux

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Debian

Debian: New Debian Developers and Maintainers, DebConf19 and More

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Debian
  • New Debian Developers and Maintainers (November and December 2018)

    The following contributors got their Debian Developer accounts in the last two months:

    Abhijith PA (abhijith)
    Philippe Thierry (philou)
    Kai-Chung Yan (seamlik)
    Simon Qhuigley (tsimonq2)
    Daniele Tricoli (eriol)
    Molly de Blanc (mollydb)
    The following contributors were added as Debian Maintainers in the last two months:

    Nicolas Mora
    Wolfgang Silbermayr
    Marcos Fouces
    kpcyrd
    Scott Martin Leggett

  • DebConf19 is looking for sponsors!

    DebConf19 will be held in Curitiba, Brazil from July 21th to 28th, 2019. It will be preceded by DebCamp, July 14th to 19th, and Open Day on the 20th.

    DebConf, Debian's annual developers conference, is an amazing event where Debian contributors from all around the world gather to present, discuss and work in teams around the Debian operating system. It is a great opportunity to get to know people responsible for the success of the project and to witness a respectful and functional distributed community in action.

    The DebConf team aims to organize the Debian Conference as a self-sustaining event, despite its size and complexity. The financial contributions and support by individuals, companies and organizations are pivotal to our success.

  • Nonce sense paper online

    When you create a cryptographic signatures using ECDSA (the elliptic curve digital signature algorithm), you need to come up with the nonce, a 256 bit random number. It is really important to use a different nonce every time, otherwise it is easy for someone else to take your signatures (which might be stored for everyone to read on the Bitcoin blockchain) and calculate your private key using relatively simple math, and with your private key they can spend all your Bitcoins. In fact, there is evidence that people out there continuously monitor the blockchains for signatures with such repeated nonces and immediately extract the money from compromised keys.

    Less well known, but still nothing new to the crypto (as in cryptopgraphy) community is the that an attacker can calculate the key from signature that use different, but similar nonces: For example if they are close by each other (only the low bits differ), or if they differ by exactly a large power of two (only the high bits differ). This uses a fancy and powerful technique based on lattices. Our main contribution here is to bridge crypto (as in cryptopgraphy) and crypto (as in cryptocurrency) and see if such vulnerabilities actually exist out there.

    And indeed, there are some. Not many (which is good), but they do exist, and clearly due to more than one source. Unfortunately, it is really hard to find out who made these signatures, and with which code, so we can only guess about the causes of these bugs. A large number of affected signatures are related to multisig transactions, so we believe that maybe hardware tokens could be the cause here.

  • Jonathan Dowland: Amiga floppy recovery project, part 3: preliminaries

    The first step for my Amiga project was to recover the hardware from my loft and check it all worked.

    When we originally bought the A500 (in, I think, 1991) we bought a RAM expansion at the same time. The base model had a whole 512KiB of RAM, but it was common for people to buy a RAM expander that doubled the amount of memory to a whopping 1 MiB. The official RAM expander was the Amiga 501, which fit into a slot on the underside of the Amiga, behind a trapdoor.

    The 501 also featured a real-time clock (RTC), which was powered by a backup NiCad battery soldered onto the circuit board. These batteries are notorious for leaking over a long enough time-frame, and our Amiga had been in a loft for at least 20 years. I had heard about this problem when I first dug the machine back out in 2015, and had a vague memory that I checked the board at the time and could find no sign of leakage, but reading around the subject more recently made me nervous, so I double-checked.

  • Debian Bug Squash Party Tokyo 2019-01
  • Mario Lang: Please delete me from Planet

    Wow. Hi Debian. Apparently, you've changed even more in a direction I personally never really liked. As a member of a minority group, I feel the need to explain that I highly dislike the way you are currently handling minority groups. And no, I dont feel you are ignoring them. You are giving a select view far too much attention for a technically focused project.

Understanding Debian GNU/Linux Releases

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GNU
Linux
Debian

The universe of the Debian GNU/Linux distribution comes with its own odds and ends. In this article we explain what a release of Debian is, how it is named, and what are the basic criteria for a software package to become part of a regular release.

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Debian: UEFI 'Secure' Boot, Netatalk, 64-bit arm64 and ZDBSP

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Debian
  • Debian 10 "Buster" Working To Have UEFI SecureBoot In Good Shape

    While most major Linux distributions have been supporting UEFI SecureBoot for years already in order to work nicely on modern locked-down (generally Windows pre-loaded) PCs, Debian stable releases have yet to properly support SecureBoot but that should be changing with this year's release of 10.0 Buster.

    Debian 9 "Stretch" ended up not having Secure Boot support in time while now for the Debian 10.0 release that's beginning its initial soft freeze, UEFI SecureBoot has fortunately been worked out.

  • Apple Time Machine backups on Debian 9 (Stretch)

    Netatalk 3.1.12 has been released which fixes an 18 year old RCE bug. The Medium write up on CVE-2018-1160 by Jacob Baines is quite an entertaining read.

    The full release notes for 3.1.12 are unfortunately not even half as interesting.

  • Steve McIntyre: Rebuilding the entire Debian archive twice on arm64 hardware for fun and profit

    This has taken a while in coming, for which I apologise. There's a lot of work involved in rebuilding the whole Debian archive, and many days spent analysing the results. You learn quite a lot, too! Smile

    I promised way back before DebConf 18 last August that I'd publish the results of the rebuilds that I'd just started. Here they are, after a few false starts. I've been rebuilding the archive specifically to check if we would have any problems building our 32-bit Arm ports (armel and armhf) using 64-bit arm64 hardware. I might have found other issues too, but that was my goal.

  • ZDBSP

    A Debian package of ZDBSP is now available in the unstable distribution.

Daniel Pocock: Debian's human rights paradox

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Debian

It all started with a non-native-English speaker choosing the wrong pronoun in reference to a developer who identifies as non-binary. What, then, is the basis for this concern? Why do we give a damn about it?

Is it because Sage Sharp is a great friend of Debian? Or is it because we would have the same concern for all LGBTQ+ people? In other words, is it about egos or is it about principles?

I suspect and hope most people would agree it is about principles. We would expect the same respect to be shown referring to any person from a minority even if they have no relation to Debian whatsoever.

If it is about principles, then, do we need to identify the principles that guide us, to ensure consistency in decision making? Recent posts on debian-project suggested human rights may not apply in Debian as we are not a Government, the same attitude has been repeated more strongly in a private email of the Debian account managers (DAM)...

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Also: Thorsten Alteholz: My Debian Activities in December 2018

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More in Tux Machines

Pseudo-Open Source (Openwashing)

OSS Leftovers

  • The Serverless Show: The Importance of Open Source & Community Involvement
    “I’m also involved with some open source projects. I started with Node community and helping out with some node libraries a long time ago. Now I’m mostly doing serverless-related things. I joined the Claudia.js team a long time ago, almost at the beginning, and helped Gojko Adzic and Alexander Simovich to build Claudia.js. Claudia was and still is a deployment library for AWS Lambda and API gateway. At the beginning, it was really hard to deploy serverless applications. If you tried to do that manually, you need to zip everything, to set the permissions, and things like that. The idea of Claudia was to extend AWS CLI tools and to help users deploy serverless applications easier. We continued doing Claudia and a few other things. We contributed a bit to AWS SAM and we built some other applications that are open source. We’re trying to build tools that we need and that the serverless community needs.”
  • Expect to Hear More About Open Source’s Role in Security [Ed: Security implemented with proprietary software is almost always fake. The Australian back doors ("encryption") bill is a reminder of it. If something is proprietary, one must assume back doors (even mandated from above, hidden in binaries)]
    Will 2019 be the year there is a big push for consolidation between open source and cybersecurity? Yes, said Sanjay Beri, CEO of Netskope, in an email comment. IBM’s acquisition of Red Hat could prove to be the game changer in how organizations approach security.
  • Want to Save Some Money? Check out These Free Software Alternatives
    The list covers drawing and design, animation and film, website building, and others. For example, Ghost Malone presents several free alternatives to drawing, design and post-processing, such as GIMP, Krita, Fire Alpaca, Autodesk Sketchbook, MediBang Paint, and Paint.NET. Another example, for editing vector graphics, is Inkscape, which is free and open source. The list goes on with several choices depending on what you're looking for.
  • A free and open source Bitcoin trading tool has been developed by two students
    University students Jonathan Shobrook and Aaron Lichtman have created a free and open source automated trading bot to use on the Bitstamp exchange.
  • Thank Stanford researchers for Puffer, a free and open source live TV streaming service that uses AI to improve video-streaming algorithms
  • Open Source To Open Newer Avenues For CIOs In 2019
    Open source plays a crucial role in all the top strategic technology trends that are reshaping the IT world. Rajarshi Bhattacharyya, Country Head, SUSE, looks at the key trends for 2019 that organizations need to explore and in explains how open source technologies and practices open up a window of opportunities for the CIOs in the coming days.
  • The High Profile Team of Handshake Looks to Truly Open the Internet with a New Domain Name System
    Unlike other major blockchain based companies like Ethereum, they chose to avoid ICO funding altogether and went straight for private investors. They were able to obtain major private investment funding from companies such as Polychain Capital, A16Z Crypto, and Founders Fund (purchasing 7.5% coin supply of HNS between them at $10.2M) with the idea that they could be responsible for replacing entire layers of Domain Name System (DNS) layering. This removes the need for those who safeguard these layers, saving future companies large amounts of cash up front.
  • Handshake is attempting to make the Internet more open
    Handshake came out of stealth mode last August. The project, which intends to replace various levels of the Domain Name System (DNS) hierarchy, was founded by Joseph Poon (co-creator of the Lightning Network & Plasma), Andrew Lee (co-founder & CEO of Purse), Andrew Lee (co-founder & CEO of Private Internet Access), Boyma Fahnbulleh (Bcoin developer), and Christopher Jeffery (Creator of Bcoin & CTO of Purse). Sidestepping the ICO route popularized by Ethereum, Handshake raised private funding from a slew of investors including A16Z Crypto, Polychain Capital, and Founders Fund. These investors purchased 7.5% of the initial coin supply of HNS, Handshake’s native token, for $10.2M, valuing the protocol at $136M.
  • Google remains the top open-source contributor to CNCF projects
    According to the latest data from Stackalytics, a project founded by Mirantis and hosted by the OpenStack Foundation that visualizes a company’s contribution to open-source projects, Google remains the dominant force in the CNCF open-source ecosystem. Indeed, according to this data, Google is responsible for almost 53 percent of all code commits to CNCF projects. Red Hat, the second biggest contributor, is far behind, with 7.4 percent. The CNCF is the home of Kubernetes, the extremely popular container orchestration service that Google open sourced, so the fact that Google is the top contributor may not seem like a major surprise. But according to this data, Google would still be the top code contributor to all CNCF projects without even taking Kubernetes into account. In part, that’s due to the fact that Google is also the major contributor to GRPC, a queuing project the company donated to the CNCF, and Vitess, the database clustering system it developed for YouTube.
  • Google Remains Top Open-Source Contributor
    According to a scan of code contributions to projects sponsored by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), Google (NASDAQ: GOOGL) remains by far the largest contributor of code across all projects. Using a tool called Stackalytics, the survey conducted by open-source infrastructure vendor Mirantis found that Google accounted for 52.9 percent of code commits to CNCF projects.
  • Johnson Controls to Introduce Open-Source Software for Targeting Retrofits

Server Side Public License (SSPL), Red Hat and Fedora

  • Red Hat/Fedora decide MongoDB’s SSLP doesn’t fit
    MongoDB’s January blues deepened this week as the team behind the Red Hat-backed Fedora Linux distribution confirmed it had added the open source database’s Server Side Public License to its “bad”list. The move came as it emerged Red Hat – Fedora’s sponsor – had nixed MongoDB support in RHEL 8.0.
  • AWS Raised Its Hand Lest Of Open Source Platform
    Even though AWS stands by MongoDB as the best the customers find it difficult to build and vastly accessible applications on the open-source platform can range from multiple terabytes to hundreds of thousands of reads and writes per second. Thus, the company built its own document database with an Apache 2.0 open source MongoDB 3.6 API compatibility. The open-sources politics are quite difficult to grasp. AWS has been blamed for taking the top open-source projects and re-branding plus re-using it without providing the communities. The catch here is that MongoDB was the company behind putting a halt to the re-licensing of the open-source tools under a novel license that clearly stated the companies willing to do this will have to purchase a commercial license.
  • Red Hat gets heebie-jeebies over MongoDB's T&Cs squeeze: NoSQL database dropped from RHEL 8B over license
    MongoDB justified its decision last October to shift the free version of its NoSQL database software, MongoDB Community Server, from the open-source GNU Affero General Public License to the not-quite-so-open Server Side Public License (SSPL) by arguing that cloud providers sell open-source software as a service without giving back. The following month, and not widely noticed until this week, Red Hat said it would no longer include MongoDB in version 8 of Red Hat Enterprise Linux. The removal notice came in the release notes for Red Hat Enterprise Linux Beta 8.0. Under section 4.7, the release notes say, "Note that the NoSQL MongoDB database server is not included in RHEL 8.0 Beta because it uses the Server Side Public License (SSPL)."
  • Server Side Public License struggles to gain open-source support
    MongoDB first announced the release of the new software license in October as a way to protect itself and other open-source projects like it from being taken advantage of by larger companies for monetary gain. At the time, MongoDB co-founder and CTO Eliot Horowitz explained: “This should be a time of incredible opportunity for open source. The revenue generated by a service can be a great source of funding for open-source projects, far greater than what has historically been available. The reality, however, is that once an open-source project becomes interesting, it is too easy for large cloud vendors to capture most of the value while contributing little or nothing back to the community.” Other open-source businesses have developed their own licenses or adopted others in recent months, citing the same issues. However, the problem with these new licenses is that if they are not approved by the Open Source Initiative (OSI), an organization created to promote and protect the open-source ecosystem, the software behind the license is technically not considered open source, and it will have a hard time getting acceptance from members in the community.
  • Open source has a problem with monetization, not AWS
  • Why you should take notice of the open source in enterprise suckers conundrum
    In the MongoDB case, AWS is widely regarded as responding to a licensing change MongoDB made in October 2018 that has caused something of a stir among the open source cognoscenti.
  • Fedora Community Blog: FPgM report: 2019-03
    Here’s your report of what has happened in Fedora Program Management this week. I’ve set up weekly office hours in #fedora-meeting-1. Drop by if you have any questions or comments about the schedule, Changes, elections, or anything else.

How to Integrate Dropbox in Ubuntu Using Nautilus File Manager

This beginners guide will help you to install and integrate Dropbox in Ubuntu’s Nautilus file manager. Dropbox is a popular file hosting service provides users cloud storage and access to your files from any device. Dropbox provides free account upto a certain storage limit and also provides subscription based accounts. Dropbox provides native desktop apps for Linux systems. Read more