Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Debian

Debian and Ubuntu News

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu

Second Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" Preview Out Now with Linux Kernel 4.4.35 LTS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Today, December 7, 2016, the development team behind the Debian-based Parsix GNU/Linux operating system have announced the release of the second preview version of the upcoming Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" distribution.

Still based on the Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" repositories, Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" Test2 is here one and a half months after the previous development release, and ships with more recent technologies and Open Source software projects, including the latest GNOME 3.22.2 desktop environment and Linux 4.4.35 LTS kernel.

Read more

Also: Welcome to Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15-TEST-2 Release Notes

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • My Free Software Activities in November 2016

    This was my ninth month as a paid contributor and I have been paid to work 11 hours on Debian LTS, a project started by Raphaël Hertzog.

  • Debian/TeX Live 2016.20161130-1

    As we are moving closer to the Debian release freeze, I am shipping out a new set of packages. Nothing spectacular here, just the regular updates and a security fix that was only reported internally. Add sugar and a few minor bug fixes.

  • Canonical yells at European cloud provider

    Open saucy outfit Canonical is in the middle of a legal dispute with an unnamed “a European cloud provider” over the use of its own homespun version of Ubuntu on their cloud servers.

    Canonical is worried that the implementation disables even the most basic of security features and Canonical fears that when something bad happens, the great unwashed will not blame the cloud provider but will instead blame Ubuntu.

    Writing in the company bog, Canonical said that it has spent months trying to get the unnamed provider to use the standard Ubuntu as delivered to other commercial operations to no avail. It said that Red Hat and Microsoft wouldn’t be treated like this.

  • Should Linux Mint be discontinued?

    Linux Mint has been quite popular with many users for a very long time. But changes to Linux Mint in recent years have one redditor wondering exactly what the point of using it is these days. Distributions like Fedora, Ubuntu and others have also stolen some of Linux Mint's thunder with notable improvements and popular spins.

Debian News

Filed under
Debian
  • My Debian Activities in November 2016

    This month I marked 377 packages for accept and rejected 36 packages. I also sent 13 emails to maintainers asking questions.

  • Debian LTS report for November 2016

    Noevember 2016 was my third month as a Debian LTS team member. I was allocated 11 hours and had 1,75 hours left from October. This makes a total of 12,75 hours. In November I spent all 12,75 hours (and even a bit more) preparing security updates for spip, memcached and monit.

  • Free software activities in November 2016

    Whilst anyone can inspect the source code of free software for malicious flaws, most software is distributed pre-compiled to end users.

    The motivation behind the Reproducible Builds effort is to permit verification that no flaws have been introduced — either maliciously or accidentally — during this compilation process by promising identical results are always generated from a given source, thus allowing multiple third-parties to come to a consensus on whether a build was compromised.

Devuan GNU/Linux Continues Its Vision of Providing Debian Without Systemd

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

It appears that the developers behind the Debian-based Devuan GNU/Linux operating system continue to pursue their vision of providing a libre Debian fork without the systemd init system.

Read more

Also: Devuan 1.0 Jessie beta 2: That’s Debian Jessie minus systemd

Devuan and Ubuntu

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • New Devuan Beta, Sharket Mare, 2016 Predictions

    Not even 24 hours after my saying there hasn't been a new Devuan release since April, the project released Beta 2 for 32 and 64-bit machines. Elsewhere, Jeremy Garcia celebrates 16 years of LinuxQuestions.org and writer-blogger Bruce Byfield today said that Linux and its application are commercial grade despite what some may think. The Ubuntu 17.04 release schedule was posted and Canonical has approved Snaps sans dependencies.

  • Systemd-Free Debian Fork Devuan Releases Its Second Beta
  • Docker and Canonical partner on CS Docker Engine for millions of Ubuntu users
  • Docker, Canonical Team Up on CS Docker Engine for Ubuntu

    When it comes to containers, Canonical has been early to make many of the right moves. The company was one one of the first to weave in platform support for Docker, which is partly significant because the majority of OpenStack deployments are built on Ubuntu.

    Now, Docker and Canonical have announced an integrated Commercially Supported (CS) Docker Engine offering on Ubuntu, meant to provide Canonical customers with a single path for support of the Ubuntu operating system and CS Docker Engine in enterprise Docker operations.

  • Ubuntu devs can now build Snaps without dependencies

    To encourage app distribution advancements, Canonical is now letting Ubuntu app developers build their Snaps without bundling their dependencies. The new support comes through the ubuntu-app-platform snap that has just been reached the Ubuntu Software store.

systemd free Linux distro Devuan releases second beta

Filed under
Debian

The self-proclaimed “Veteran Unix Admins” forking Debian in the name of init freedom have released Beta 2 of their “Devuan” Linux distribution.

Devuan came about after some users felt it had become too desktop-friendly. The change the greybeards objected to most was the decision to replace sysvinit init with systemd, a move felt to betray core Unix principles of user choice and keeping bloat to a bare minimum.

Read more

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • Debian Project News - November 28th, 2016

    Welcome to this year's fourth issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community.

  • 4 Snap Apps You Can Install on Ubuntu Right Now

    In the mood to read a quick round-up of a some popular desktop Linux apps that are now available to install as Snappy apps?

    Me too, so I wrote one.

    For the purposes of this post (read: cos i’m lazy) you won’t find apps that are not intended to be distributed widely listed (i.e. apps which require an argument to be passed to install them, like Dekko, LibreOffice, and others).

    If you’re on a metered internet connection (or subsisting on a slow one) installing apps as Snaps probably isn’t the most effective use of your bandwidth. Until Snap frameworks (or whatever Canonical calls Snap dependencies) arrive most Snaps that you install are bundled with everything needed to run.

  • Ubuntu Prepping Its 16.04 "Rolling HWE Kernel"

    Similar to past Ubuntu LTS (Long Term Support) releases, Ubuntu 16.04.2 and beyond will feature hardware enablement kernels back-ported from newer Ubuntu releases in order to allow new hardware to work on these older LTS releases, but now the Xenial Xerus is switching to a concept of a "rolling HWE kernel."

    Canonical's Leann Ogasawara describes the rolling HWE kernel as, "The biggest change is that we are moving to what we refer to as a "rolling HWE kernel" model. Essentially, consumers of an HWE kernel will automatically be upgraded to the next HWE kernel offered in subsequent point releases until reaching the final HWE Kernel offered in 16.04.5." So it's really not like a true rolling Linux kernel, just that you will automatically be upgraded to future HWE kernels with future LTS point releases. It's documented more at this Wiki page.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

Filed under
Debian
Ubuntu
  • The Systemd-Free Debian Fork Celebrates Its Second Birthday

    Devuan, the Debian fork that frees the system of systemd, is now two years old.

    Yesterday marked two years since the announcement of the systemd-free Debian fork, Devuan.

    Two years going, this Linux OS that aims for "Init Freedom" isn't the most vibrant distribution out there. When's the last time you've heard of Devuan or even used it yourself? This year much of the systemd "hate" seems to have calmed down compared to prior years, although new features continue to be tacked onto systemd. Here's an interesting Google Trends comparison for those interested.

  • Debian with three monitors under low cost graphics interface

    Since 2008 I use two monitors in my desktop. Yesterday I bought a new graphics interface and a third monitor. Some time I was looking for a low cost graphics interface. Ok, I am using GeForce GT 740 which has three output ports: VGA, DVI and HDMI. In Brazil this interface card can be found around R$ 400 (US$ 117, but my card was US$ 87 in Brazilian Black Friday). In Amazon.com, it is between US$ 51 and US$ 109. The chosen manufacturer was Zotac, but all GT 740 and 750 will work fine (I tested the GT 750 too).

  • Canonical Announces the Availability of Ubuntu Advantage VG on AWS Marketplace

    Canonical, through Udi Nachmany, head of the Ubuntu Certified Public Cloud program, was proud to announce the availability for purchase of Ubuntu Advantage Virtual Guests on the AWS marketplace.

  • Mir is not only about Unity8

    Mir is a project to support the management applications on the display(s) of a computer. It can be compared to the more familiar X-Windows used on the current Ubuntu desktop (and many others). I’ll discuss some of the motivation for Mir below, but the point of this post is to clarify the relationship between Mir and Unity8.

  • Mir/Ubuntu Developer Talks Up Mir Outside Of Unity 8

    Most talk these days of Ubuntu's Unity 8 next-gen desktop experience and their Mir display server goes hand-in-hand since the change-over is planned in-step before Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, but there's a new Ubuntu Insights blog post up working to promote Mir as more than just tech for the Unity 8 desktop.

    Canonical engineer Alan Griffith has written a blog post today about Mir outside of Unity 8. Mir's abstraction layer is providing libmiral.so as a stable library to Mir providing window manager, the miral-shell providing both traditional and tiling window manager, and miral-kiosk as a sample "kiosk" with basic window management.

  • What’s New in Ubuntu 17.04 (Zesty Zapus) – Overview

    Ubuntu 17.04, code named Zesty Zapus, is the future release that will succeed Ubuntu 16.10, and even though it’s End of life date has been scheduled for January 2018, the development team aims to bring a lot of upgrades, fixes, and additions in this release.

Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 (Nev) and 8.10 (Erik) Get New Security Updates from Debian

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Debian

Today, November 27, 2016, the developers of the Debian-based Parsix GNU/Linux distribution announced the availability of new security updates for the Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" and 8.15 "Nev" releases.

While the upcoming Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" release is still in the works, it gets the same security update as Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik," which are being ported from the upstream repositories of Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie" (a.k.a. Debian Stable) to Parsix GNU/Linux's own repos.

It's been a week since our previous report on the security updates pushed to the stable Parsix GNU/Linux repositories, and we're seeing updated versions of the Vim text editor, Apache Tomcat 7 and 8 Java Servlet Containers, as well as Wireshark network protocol analyzer.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices

Open Source Software A Core Competency For Effective Tech M&A

Imagine your company just acquired its competitor for $100 million. Now imagine the company’s most important asset – its proprietary software – is subject to third-party license conditions that require the proprietary software to be distributed free of charge or in source code form. Or, imagine these license conditions are discovered late in the diligence process, and the cost to replace the offending third-party software will costs tens of thousands of dollars and take months to remediate. Both scenarios exemplify the acute, distinct and often overlooked risks inherent to the commercial use of open source software. An effective tech M&A attorney must appreciate these risks and be prepared to take the steps necessary to mitigate or eliminate them. Over the past decade, open source software has become a mainstay in the technology community. Since its beginnings, open source software has always been viewed as a way to save money and jumpstart development projects, but it is increasingly being looked to for its quality solutions and operational advantages. Today, only a fraction of technology companies do not use open source software in any way. For most of the rest, it is mission critical. Read more

AMD Graphics

SUSE Leftovers

  • Git, Kernels, LightDM, More update in Tumbleweed
    Topping the list of updates for snapshot 20161129 was the update to Light Display Manager 1.21.1, which added an Application Programming Interface (API) version to the greeter-daemon protocol for future enhancements. Other updates in the snapshot include openVPN, which added a recommended utility for network and traffic protocols, and subpackages for systemd relevant for 32-bit users. Desktop manager xfdesktop updated to version 4.12.3 and introduced rotating wallpaper images if the images contain rotation information. The programming language vala, which aims to bring modern programming language features to GNOME developers without imposing any additional runtime requirements, updated in the 20161129 and 20161201 snapshots.
  • openSUSE Leap 42.1 upgrade to Leap 42.2
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/49
    I’m sure nobody doubted it, but Tumbleweed is back on the roll! And in fact, we did the impossible and released 8 snapshots in a week. This review will cover {1201..1208}.