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BSD

BSD Leftovers (mostly Phoronix)

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BSD

GhostBSD 10.1 Finally Available

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BSD

After a year of development, testing and debugging we are pleased to announce the release of GhostBSD 10.1 MATE & XFCE which is available on SourceForge and torrents for the amd64 and i386 architectures.

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GhostBSD 10.1 BETA2 now available

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BSD

We are pleased to announce the availability GhostBSD 10.1 BETA2 MATE & XFCE which is available on SourceForge for the amd64 and i386 architectures.

Before going further I will like to say a special thanks Ovidiu who recently join back the project and Andrea who join the project, they have help to make GhostBSD better, add up new feature and fixed issue.

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Leftovers: BSD

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BSD
  • Coming Soon to OpenBSD/amd64: A Native Hypervisor

    Earlier today, Mike Larkin (mlarkin@) published a teaser for something he's been working on for a while.

  • the peculiar libretunnel situation

    The author of stunnel has (once, twice) asserted that stunnel may not be used with LibreSSL, only with OpenSSL. This is perhaps a strange thing for free software to do, and it creates the potential for some very weird consequences.

    First, some background. The OpenSSL license and the GPL are both free software licenses, but they are different flavors of freedom, meaning you can’t mix them. It would be like mixing savory and sweet. Can’t do it. Alright, so maybe technically you can do it, but you’re not supposed to. The flavor, er, freedom police will come get you. One workaround is for the GPL software to say, oh, but maybe wait, here’s an exception. (Does this make the software more or less free?) Here’s a longer explanation with sample exception.

  • FreeBSD on Beagle Bone Black (with X11)

    X11 clients on the Beagle Bone Black .. that’s X11 over the network, with the X Server elsewhere. No display as yet. The FreeBSD wiki notes that there’s no (mini) HDMI driver yet. So I built some X11 programs, xauth(1) and xmessage(1), and installed them on the Bone. Since I bought a blue case for the Bone, and it is the smallest computer in the house (discounting phones .. let’s call it the smallest hackable computer in the house) the kids decided to call it smurf. Here’s a screenshot of poudriere’s text console as it builds packages.

OpenBSD Is Getting Its Own Native Hypervisor

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BSD

The OpenBSD Foundation has been funding work on a project to provide OpenBSD with its own, native hypervisor.

The hypervisor's VMM is so far able to launch a kernel and ask for a root file-system, but beyond that, it's been laying most of the hypervisor foundation up to this point.

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FreeBSD on Beagle Bone Black, HAMMER2, and LLVM

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BSD

DragonFlyBSD's Intel DRM Code Up To Linux 3.17 Match

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BSD

François Tigeot has landed his i915 Intel DRM driver update that brings the DragonFlyBSD's Intel graphics driver up to parity with the Linux 3.17 kernel.

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NeXTBSD Is Creating Lots Of BSD Excitement

Why FreeBSD should not adopt launchd

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BSD

I have been keeping an eye on NextBSD for some time, when it was initially just openlaunchd, an effort initially started by R. Tyler as a GSoC student in 2005 to, unsurprisingly, port the launchd system and service manager to FreeBSD. It was stalled for a long time until its revival in late 2013, but again moving very slowly.

Around November of 2014 at the MeetBSD conference, Jordan Hubbard delivered a talk entitled “FreeBSD: The Next 10 Years,” which outlined a general desire for a more “event-driven” and unified configuration approach to FreeBSD, strongly implying the use of launchd as system bootstrap and service daemon, as well as other parts of the OS X low-level userspace.

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OpenSSH 7.1 Fixes Root Access Authentication Issue, Adds Better Support for WinSCP

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OSS
BSD

OpenBSD, through Dave Wreski, announced the immediate availability for download of the first point release of the OpenSSH 7 and Portable OpenSSH 7 open-source SSH (Secure Shell) protocol 2.0 implementations.

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More in Tux Machines

Canonical Joins The Document Foundation's LibreOffice Project Advisory Board

Today, July 26, 2016, Canonical and The Document Foundation (TDF) announced that the company behind the popular Ubuntu operating system had joined the LibreOffice project Advisory Board. If you're using the Ubuntu Linux OS on your personal computer, you are aware of the fact that the award-winning LibreOffice office suite is installed by default. Canonical chose to use LibreOffice as the default office suite for its widely-used GNU/Linux operating system since the first release of the open-source software in early 2011. Now that Canonical announced the availability of Snaps as universal binary packages for Ubuntu and other supported GNU/Linux distributions, many application developers decided to offer their software in the Snap package format, and it looks like The Document Foundation is among the first to adopt the latest Snappy technologies for LibreOffice. Read more

Linux Filesystems Explained — EXT2/3/4, XFS, Btrfs, ZFS

The first time I installed Ubuntu on my computer, when I was sixteen, I was astonished by the number of filesystems that were available for the system installation. There were so many that I was left overwhelmed and confused. I was worried that if I picked the wrong one my system might run too slow or that it might be more problematic than another. I wanted to know which was the best. Since then, things have changed quite a bit. Many Linux distributions offer a ‘standard’ filesystem that an installation will default to unless otherwise specified. I think this was a very good move because it assists newcomers in making a decision and being comfortable with it. But, for those that are still unsure of some of the contemporary offerings, we’ll be going through them today. Read more

Today in Techrights

KDE Plasma 5.7.2 Introduces Lots of Plasma Workspace Improvements, KWin Fixes

KDE released the second maintenance update for the KDE Plasma 5.7 desktop environment series, which has already been adopted by several popular GNU/Linux operating systems. Read more