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BSD

FreeBSD 11.0 Comes Up Short In Ubuntu 16.04 vs. macOS Sierra Benchmarks

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks
BSD
Ubuntu

Yesterday I published some macOS 10.2 vs. Ubuntu 16.04 LTS benchmarks from a Mac Mini and MacBook Air systems. For those curious if BSDs can outperform macOS Sierra on Apple hardware, I tested the MacBook Air with FreeBSD 11.0 compared to the Linux and macOS results on that Core i5 system. Here are those results.

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FreeBSD Delaaays and OpenBSD Founder Theo de Raadt Upset

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BSD
  • FreeBSD 11.0-RELEASE Needs To Be Respun Due To Security Issues

    The delayed FreeBSD 11.0 release just suffered another last-minute set-back. While "FreeBSD 11.0-RELEASE images" were distributed to FTP mirrors and the official announcement expected today, these images need to be re-spun to contain some security fixes and thus pushing back the official release.

    Glen Barber noted today on the mailing list, "Although the FreeBSD 11.0-RELEASE has not yet been officially announced, many have found images on the Project FTP mirrors. However, please be aware the final 11.0-RELEASE will be rebuilt and republished on the Project mirrors as a result of a few last-minute security fixes we feel are imperative to include in the final release."

  • FreeBSD 11.0 Operating System Lands October 5 Due to Last-Minute Security Issues

    A few minutes ago, Glen Barber informed the FreeBSD community that they should not hurry and install the ISO images of the FreeBSD 11.0 operating system made available a few days ago on the official FTP mirrors.

    These images aren't safe to use and contain various security vulnerabilities that need to be fixed before the FreeBSD Project will officially unveil the final release of the FreeBSD 11.0 operating system in the coming days. According to the release schedule, FreeBSD 11.0 should hit the streets later today, September 29, 2016.

    However, until then the FreeBSD development team is hard at work patching those nasty security issues and rebuilding the final ISO images, which will be made available on the respective FTP mirrors later today as FreeBSD 11.0-RELEASE-p1. If you're already running FreeBSD 11.0-RELEASE, you will soon be provided with instructions to safely update your system

  • OpenBSD Founder Calling For LLVM To Face A Cataclysm Over Its Re-Licensing

    For over one year there's been talk of LLVM pursuing a mass relicensing from its University of Illinois/NCSA Open Source License, which is similar to the three-clause BSD license, to the Apache 2.0 license with explicit mention of GPLv2 compatibility. As mentioned in that aforelinked article, this re-licensing is moving ahead.

FreeBSD 11.0 Final Release ISO Images Available For Download

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BSD

The Final Release of FreeBSD 11.0 is scheduled for Wednesday, September 28, 2016. However, the release builds have started to appear on FreeBSD’s FTP mirrors and you can download the final ISO right now.

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FreeBSD 11.0 Gets One Last Release Candidate Build, Final Version Is Coming Soon

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BSD

FreeBSD's Glen Barber announced the other day that the third, and hopefully the last Released Candidate (RC) build of the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 operating system is now available for public testing.

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FreeBSD 11.0 RC3

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BSD

BSD Leftovers

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BSD

Trying Out Eight BSDs On A Modern PC: Some Are Smooth, Others Troublesome

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BSD

Following the seven-way Linux distribution benchmark comparison published earlier this week, on the same system I set out to test a variety of BSD distributions on the same system and ultimately benchmark their out-of-the-box performance too. Those performance benchmark results will be published later this week while today were a few remarks I wanted to share when trying out TrueOS, DragonFlyBSD, GhostBSD, FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, MidnightBSD, and PacBSD (Arch BSD) on this modern Intel Xeon system.

All of my testing was done on an Intel Xeon E5-2509 v4 Broadwell-EP system with MSI X99A WORKSTATION motherboard, NVIDIA GeForce GTX TITAN X, 16GB of DDR4 memory, and an OCZ TRION 150 120GB SATA 3.0 SSD. With the seven Linux distributions tested in recent days they all worked fine on the system: Ubuntu, Clear Linux, Scientific Linux, openSUSE Tumbleweed, Fedora, Antergos, and Sabayon Linux.

Below are my various brief remarks when testing the different BSDs on this Intel Xeon system. These are my thoughts with admittedly being a Linux enthusiast while just touching BSD, Solaris, and others only on a semi-frequent basis. I am by no means a diehard "Linux fan boy" and have no fundamental objections to BSD, I simply prefer the operating system that best fits my needs and for benchmarking where I can get my tests done in a reliable, reproducible, and timely manner. I at least prefer my operating systems have a clean and quick install process with sane defaults; working generally ~100 hour weeks, I don't have time in 2016 if an OS cannot easily install and boot properly on a modern PC. I enjoy testing out the various BSDs and have no strong bias to any of them. This is the largest BSD testing comparison I've done in the past 12 years on Phoronix at the same time and on the same hardware.

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FreeBSD Now Has A Port For CentOS 7 Binary Support

Filed under
Red Hat
BSD

We've known for a while that FreeBSD has been working on a CentOS 7 compatibility layer while now that work has finally landed in FreeBSD ports.

As of yesterday, linux_base-c7 landed in ports for installing the CentOS 7 base packages. This will allow running newer Linux binaries built for modern CentOS/RHEL 7 era systems on FreeBSD, assuming the source isn't available or isn't compatible natively with FreeBSD. Previously CentOS 6 was the default port used for this Linux binary compatibility with FreeBSD.

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BSD Leftovers

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BSD
  • Revisiting W^X with OpenBSD 6.0

    OpenBSD 6.0 was released today, and with it some exciting new security features. From my perspective, the chief among them is the technical enforcement of W^X in user-land. Since moving to a technical control rather than a policy statement for enforcing executable space protection was a result of discussions caused by my last blog post on the situation, I’m very excited about this development and thought that giving a demonstration and discussion would be in order. (In the spirit of not putting the headline on Page 1 and the retraction on Page 11, hopefully BSDNow will cover this as well).

  • OpenBSD 6.0 : why and how

    The only operating system I use on my computers is not Mac, not Windows, and not even Linux. It's OpenBSD, and I love it so much.

    Since OpenBSD 6.0 was released today, I figured I should say a little something about why I love it, and how you can try it.

  • PC-BSD Evolves into TrueOS

    We are proud to announce that the PC-BSD project has evolved into TrueOS: a modern, cutting-edge distribution of FreeBSD focused on security, simplicity, and stability for desktops, servers, and beyond! TrueOS harnesses the best elements of PC-BSD, combines it with security technologies from OpenBSD, and layers it on top of FreeBSD to provide a complete system for modern machines.

Leftovers: BSD

Filed under
BSD
  • OpenBSD 6.0 lands

    OpenBSD developers might be keen on the 1980s in their artwork, but not in their operating system: Version 6.0 has just landed, and the maintainers have killed off VAX support.

    Apart from a logo that pays homage to the cover art for the iconic album The Wall, there's a fair amount of new stuff landing in OpenBSD 6.0.

  • LLVM 3.9 Officially Released

    As expected, LLVM 3.9 was released today as the newest version of this widely-used and innovative compiler stack.

  • LLVM 3.9 Release

    This release is the result of the LLVM community's work over the past
    six months, including ThinLTO, new libstdc++ ABI compatibility, support for all OpenCL 2.0 and all non-offloading OpenMP 4.5 features, clang-include-fixer, many new clang-tidy checks, significantly improved ELF linking with lld, identical code folding and initial LTO support in lld, as well as improved optimization, many bug fixes and more.

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More in Tux Machines

Parrot Security 3.10 Ethical Hacking OS Adds Full Firejail/AppArmor Sandboxing

ParrotSec devs released today a new stable version of their Debian-based Parrot Security OS ethical hacking and penetration testing GNU/Linux distribution. There are many enhancements implemented in the Parrot Security OS 3.10 release, but the biggest new feature is the introduction of a full Firejail and AppArmor sandboxing system that should proactively protect the operating system from attacks by isolating its components with the combination of various security techniques. "The first experiments were already introduced in Parrot 3.9 with the inclusion of Firejail, but we took almost a month of hard work to make it even better with the improvement of many profiles, the introduction of the AppArmor support and enough time to make all the tests," reads today's announcement. Read more Also: Parrot 3.10 is out

GNOME 3.27.3 Released

  • GNOME 3.27.3 released
    GNOME 3.27.3, the third development snapshot in the 3.28 development cycle, is now available. A few more modules have been ported to meson, and lots of development is happening across all modules. To point out a few highlights, dconf-editor is seeing significant work, and evolution has had many bug fixes.
  • GNOME 3.27.3 Brings More Meson Ports, Redesign To DConf Editor
    Matthias Clasen of Red Hat announced the release of GNOME 3.27.3 this weekend. GNOME 3.27.3 is the latest in a string of development releases leading up to the stable GNOME 3.28 debut in March.
  • GNOME 3.28 Desktop Environment Gets Third Development Snapshot, More Meson Ports
    GNOME leader Matthias Clasen announced a few moments ago the availability of the third development snapshot towards the GNOME 3.28 desktop environment for GNU/Linux distributions. The development cycle of the upcoming GNOME 3.28 desktop environment continues today with the GNOME 3.27.3 milestone, which ports more components to the Meson build system and adds various improvements to various apps and tools, including the Evolution email and calendar client, NetworkManager network connection manager, and dconf-editor.

Review: OnePlus 5T

Have you ever arrived at a party, looked around, and realized you’re totally underdressed? It’s a panic-inducing moment. This nightmare scenario happened to OnePlus earlier this year. Its OnePlus 5 had the brains to match any competing Android device, but next to phones like the Galaxy S8, LG G6, iPhone X, it looked, well, dowdy. With thick, squared off bezels and an eyesore of a home button, it was so last season. For four years, OnePlus has pinned its entire identity to the idea that it sells the phone with the highest specs at the lowest price. Instead of paying $850+ for a fancy phone from the likes of Google or Samsung, you can buy a nearly identical, slightly off-brand OnePlus for $500 or less. It was the phone those in the know would recommend to save a few hundred bucks and still have a brag-worthy device. But you couldn’t brag about the OnePlus 5, especially after some bugs plagued the device. Read more

Android Leftovers