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BSD: Capsicum Project in FreeBSD and Elisa in FreeBSD

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BSD
  • Capsicum

    I spent a couple of years evangelizing about Capsicum. I wrote many articles about it. So, it is very natural that I would also like to update you on this blog about the progress of the Capsicum project in FreeBSD, because this is what I’m doing in my free time. That said I feel that this blog wouldn’t be completed without some introduction to what Capsicum is. This post should fill this gap. Over the next weeks and months we will extend this topic and discuss different parts of Capsicum. Without further introduction let’s jump into the topic

  • Elisa in FreeBSD

    Elisa (product page, release announcements blog) is a music player designer for excellent integration into the KDE Plasma desktop (but of course it runs everywhere, including some non-Free platforms). I had used it a few times, but had not gotten around to packaging it. So today I threw together a FreeBSD port of Elisa, and you’ll be able to install it from official packages whenever the package cluster gets around to it.

FreeBSD 12.0 Beta 4 Released, Allows NVIDIA Driver To Work With 64-bit Linux Emulation

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BSD

One change catching our attention are to FreeBSD's linux/linux64 kernel modules for its Linux compatibility code. With changes that had been sought since early 2016, the FreeBSD NVIDIA proprietary driver should now play nicely with the linux64 module. This is necessary for FreeBSD 64-bit CUDA support with NVIDIA's driver. Previously the FreeBSD CUDA support played nicely with 32-bit, but that was dropped in CUDA 9.0. This should help too for other 64-bit Linux emulation code for working with NVIDIA's binary graphics driver.

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FreeBSD 12.0 Faces A Minor Setback But Still Should Be Out Ahead Of Christmas

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BSD

The big FreeBSD 12.0 release still is expected to happen in December but will be a bit later than originally planned.

The FreeBSD release engineering team has decided that a fourth beta is warranted before branching the FreeBSD 12 code and moving onto the release candidate phase. There already has been a number of alpha releases and three betas, but due to a boot time issue and allowing more time for ARM/ARM64 builds to complete, a fourth beta has been penciled into the schedule.

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Also: malloc.conf replaced with a sysctl

FreeBSD 12.0-BETA3 Now Available

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BSD
  • FreeBSD 12.0-BETA3 Now Available

    The third BETA build of the 12.0-RELEASE release cycle is now available.

  • FreeBSD 12.0 Beta 3 Brings Bhyve Update, NUMA Disabling Via sysctl

    Another weekly beta release of FreeBSD 12 is now available for testing with the official release still being several weeks out.

    FreeBSD 12.0 Beta 3 now allows NUMA support to be disabled via a new vm.numa.disabled sysctl tunable, the Bhyve hypervisor can now allow the VNC server to listen for incoming IPv6 connections, various hardware driver updates, and SPE exception handling for PowerPCSPE architecture.

OpenBSD on a Laptop

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BSD
HowTos

It's been almost a year since I've posted any articles, and I'm afraid I have a confession to make...I've joined the dark side! Most people know my site from the How to Run a Mail Server post, which targeted FreeBSD. A few months ago, I converted all that infrastructure to an automated OpenBSD platform. Turns out OpenBSD was so much easier, I decided to run it as a desktop too.

You won't find nearly as many online resources about setting up OpenBSD, because honestly, you really don't need any. Unlike much of Linux and FreeBSD, the included manuals are high quality, coherent, and filled with practical examples. You also need very little third party software to do basic tasks—almost everything you need is well-integrated into the base system.

You'll notice that many features that require toil to achieve on FreeBSD, such as suspend on lid close, working volume buttons, and decent battery life, work out of the box on OpenBSD. You can tell the developers actually use this thing on their personal devices.

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GhostBSD 18.10 Now Available

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BSD

GhostBSD 18.10 is our first official release of GhostBSD with TrueOS under the hood, and the official desktop is MATE. However, in the future, there might be some community release, but for now, there is no community released yet.

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Also: GhostBSD 18.10 Released, Built Off FreeBSD-Based TrueOS With MATE Desktop

BSD: Review of 'Absolute FreeBSD', Introducing the OpenBSD Virtualization FAQ

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BSD
  • Book Review: Absolute FreeBSD (3rd Edition)

    FreeBSD is a free and open source operating system for many different kinds of computers. FreeBSD's based upon BSD, the version of UNIX developed at the University of California, Berkeley. FreeBSD is an alternative to Linux or Windows-based system. You can run almost all apps written in Perl, Python, PHP and other programming languages. FreeBSD heavily used by Netflix, EMC, IBM, Juniper, NetApp, Apple, Sony, and others. Absolute FreeBSD (3rd ed) book aims to be the complete guide to FreeBSD. Let us see why Michael W. Lucas' FreeBSD system administration books so favorite among Unix lovers.

  • Introducing the OpenBSD Virtualization FAQ

    Now getting started with OpenBSD virtualization has become even easier: The OpenBSD FAQ has a new Virtualization section, written mainly by Solene Rapenne (solene@) and added to the site in this commit, that offers an introduction to the concepts as well as instructions on how to get started with vmm(4).

GhostBSD18.10 RC3 is Available for testing

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BSD

This third release candidate of GhostBSD 18.10 is the third official testing release of GhostBSD with TrueOS under the hood. The official desktop of GhostBSD is MATE. However, in the future, there might be an XFCE community release, but for now, there is no community release yet.

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Compilers News: GCC and LLVM

Filed under
Development
GNU
BSD
  • The D Language Front-End Finally Merged Into GCC 9

    The GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) has a new language front-end! The D language support has finally been merged.

    The D language support for GCC has long been sought after with over the past two years going through several revisions. Back in June of 2017 is when the GCC Steering Committee approved of adding the D front-end but it's taken more than a year to get the code in adequate shape for merging.

    Last month there was a renewed push for D in GCC 9 while on Sunday evening that front-end and related code was finally merged to mainline GCC.

  • Six Years After Launch, AMD Piledriver CPU Tuning Gets Reworked In LLVM Clang

    Six years after AMD introduced "Piledriver" as the successor to the original Bulldozer CPUs, the LLVM Clang compiler is seeing a revised scheduling model for these processors that can yield faster performance of generated code targeting this older class of AMD CPUs.

    Piledriver cores ended up a range of CPUs from the FX-8300 series through the FX-9590, many APUs including the A10-6800K, more than a dozen mobile parts, and also some Opteron CPUs. Piledriver as a reminder was based on a 32nm SOI process, offered better IPC over the original Bulldozer microarchitecture, bumped the clock speeds, and other incremental improvements.

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More in Tux Machines

Thunderbird version 60.3.1 now Available, Includes Fixes for Cookie Removal and Encoding Issues

Thunderbird happens to be one of the most famous Email client. It is free and an open source one which was developed by the Mozilla Foundation back in 2003, fifteen years ago. From a very basic interface, it has come a long way to be what it is today in 2018. With these updates, a recent one into the 60.x series from the 52.x series was a significant one. While the 60.x (60.3.0) update started rolling out, Mozilla was keen to push out 60.3.1. This new version of Thunderbird had a few bugs and kinks here and there which needed to be addressed which Mozilla did, most of them at least. Read more

Games: Feral Interactive, ATOM RPG, Lore Finder, UnDungeon, Humble Store Fall Sale

Another Fine Update Cycle From Microsoft

  • Windows 10 1809's new rollout: Mapped drives broken, AMD issues, Trend Micro clash
    Within days of Microsoft's first release of Windows 10 1809 at the beginning of October, IT pros noticed that Windows File Explorer indicated that mapped network drives appeared to be broken. "Testing the new 1809 update, and everything seems to be fine except all mapped drives to Windows 2012 file servers show disconnected (red x) after reboots or logoff/on," wrote one IT pro on October 5, with many others confirming the same issue on company networks.
  • Windows 10’s October 2018 Update Breaks Mapped Network Drives
    Microsoft’s October 2018 Update drama is largely over, but there are still a few lingering bugs. Microsoft has confirmed an issue where mapped network drives are broken after a PC restarts. This will not be fixed until 2019.

Linux 4.20 Showing Some Performance Slowdowns

Being well past the Linux 4.20 merge window I have moved onto benchmarking more of this development version of the Linux kernel. Unfortunately, there are some clear performance regressions. This week I got to firing off some Linux 4.20 kernel benchmarks... I started with the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX and Intel Core i9 7980XE for being the interesting HEDT CPUs in my possession at the moment. On the 7980XE I spotted several performance regressions with this Linux 4.20 development kernel compared to Linux 4.19 and 4.18, so then I fired up the completely separate Intel Core i9 7960X box to carry out the same tests. Sure enough, with that different hardware, there is further confirmation of slowdowns with Linux 4.20. The common trait of these systems was Ubuntu 18.10 x86_64 and using the Linux 4.18.18, 4.19.1, and 4.20 Git kernel packages provided by the Ubuntu Mainline Kernel PPA. With the differing hardware the intention is not to compare the performance between the systems but in looking at the direction of the Linux kernel performance. Read more