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BSD

Videos/Shows: Command Line Heroes, New in Invidious (YouTube), BSDNow, and Ubuntu Podcast

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GNU
Linux
BSD
  • Command Line Heroes: Season 8: Robot as Servant

    The 1980s promised robotic servants were in reach. They’d clean up our houses. Bring us drinks. Usher in an era of leisure. We didn’t get robot butlers. But if we look around, we’ll find an army of robotic servants already automating away domestic drudgery.

  • No The Steam Deck Won't Play Every Game - Invidious

    Due to some early information floating around some outlets reported that the Steam Deck will play every single game out there but anyone who has played games on Linux knows that would be impossible, proton is frankly not at this state.

  • JC's Linux Notes - Invidious

    A screencast in which we take a look at notes about Linux I have saved over the last few years.

  • GNOME redesign, Manjaro Cinnamon goes Vivaldi, and Steam Deck hype deflation - Linux news - Invidious
  • BSDNow 420: OpenBSD makes life better

    Choosing The Right ZFS Pool Layout, changes in OpenBSD that make life better, GhostBSD 21.09.06 ISO's now available, Fair Internet bandwidth management with OpenBSD, NetBSD wifi router project update, NetBSD on the Apple M1, HardenedBSD August Status Report, FreeBSD Journal on Wireless and Desktop, and more.

  • Ubuntu Podcast from the UK LoCo: S14E28 – Tanks Rewarding Gender [Ed: Ubuntu Podcast will end soon. So they decided to push proprietary software like Windows and DRM like Steam.]

    This week we’ve been playing with Steam and the Windows Terminal. We look back at how Ubuntu and evolved over the years, bring you some command line love and go over all your feedback.

    It’s Season 14 Episode 28 of the Ubuntu Podcast! Alan Pope, Mark Johnson and Martin Wimpress are connected and speaking to your brain.

GhostBSD 21.09.06 ISO's now available

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BSD

I am happy to announce the new ISO 21.09.06. This new ISO contains the switch from OpenRC to FreeBSD rc.d and numerous fixes and improvements.

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Audiocasts/Shows: BSDNow, TLLTS, and Bad Voltage

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GNU
Linux
BSD

NetBSD wifi project status update

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BSD
  • wifi project status update

    After initial work on the wifi renewal branch went quite fast and smooth, things have slowed down a bit in the last few months.

    Most of the slow down was due to me not being available for this type of work for unexpectedly long times - a problem that should be fixed now.

  • NetBSD Continues Long Overdue Push To Modernize Their WiFi Drivers - Phoronix

    Started back in 2018 was an effort by the NetBSD project to update their operating system WiFi drivers by re-syncing more code from FreeBSD and making various improvements. Three years later the work has yet to be merged but after stalling for some time is back to being worked on by interested developers.

    The WiFi renewal effort by NetBSD has been working to support newer WiFi standards, provide better SMP support, and handling other wireless networking features. The WiFi renewal effort was restarted last year though developer Martin Husemann noted the progress has slowed down a bit in recent months.

OpenSSH 8.7 released

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BSD

OpenSSH 8.7 has been released. Changes include steps toward deprecating scp and using the SFTP protocol for file transfers instead, changes to remote-to-remote copies (they go through the local host by default now), a stricter configuration-file parser, and more.

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NetBSD Explained: The Unix System That Can Run on Anything

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BSD

NetBSD is an open-source operating system. Like Linux, NetBSD aims for broad compatibility with Unix, offering similar utilities and behavior.

NetBSD is based on the Berkeley Software Distribution version of Unix, hence the "BSD" in the name. It's a branch off of the 386/BSD release that supported PCs in the early 1990s.

Where FreeBSD focuses on the PC platform and OpenBSD focuses on security, NetBSD focuses on portability to different platforms. While NetBSD might look like another Linux distribution, the entire system, including the kernel and user utilities, is developed together as a whole. This contrasts with the way Linux distributions cobble together components from multiple sources.

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OPNsense 21.7

Filed under
Security
BSD
  • OPNsense 21.7 released

    For more than 6 and a half years, OPNsense is driving innovation through
    modularising and hardening the open source firewall, with simple and reliable
    firmware upgrades, multi-language support, fast adoption of upstream software
    updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing.

    21.7, nicknamed "Noble Nightingale", is one of the largest iterations of
    code changes in our recent history. It will also be the last release on
    HardenedBSD 12.1. We are planning to start the work on FreeBSD 13 as soon
    as next week for the 22.1 series.

    The installer was replaced to offer native ZFS installations and prevent
    glitches in virtual machines using UEFI. Firmware updates were partially
    redesigned and the UI layout consolidated between static and MVC pages.
    The live log now contains the actual rule ID to avoid mismatches after
    adjusting your ruleset and the firewall aliases now also support wildcard
    netmasks. For a complete list of changes see below.

  • OPNsense 21.7 Released With New Installer Offering Better ZFS Support - Phoronix

    OPNsense as the FreeBSD/HardenedBSD-based firewall and routing platform long ago forked from pfSense is out with its newest major release.

    OPNsense 21.7 is "one of the largest iterations of code changes" in their recent history but is still based on HardenedBSD 12.1, the BSD effort around further security hardening of FreeBSD 12.1. OPNsense developers now following this release are beginning to transition to FreeBSD 13 for their OPNsense 22.1 release due out early next year.

  • OPNsense® 21.7 "Noble Nightingale" released

    With over 1000 commits in its core and plugin repository since the last major, this 14th major release is again packed with improvements, new and updated plugins as well as new drivers such as the new AMD XGBE driver.

    Amongst the improvements are the newly designed - API enabled - firewall states diagnostics, firewall live log template support and a full firmware update revamp.

BSD: FreeBSD and OpenBSD

Filed under
BSD
  • Migrating from Apache to Nginx on FreeBSD

    In this article I will tell you how I’ve migrated my servers running Apache+PHP to Nginx+PHP-fpm without diying the process.

  • Signify

    We look at OpenBSD’s Signify. You can use Signify as an alternative to GnuPG or Minisign for signing and verifying files.

    Signify uses Ed25519 for cryptographic signing and verification. OpenBSD developers use Signify extensively for signing. Actually, Ted Unangst developed the tool to sign and verify OpenBSD’s files. Besides, some other projects rely on Signify, like Wireguard, radare2, or LibreSSL.

    The current version of Signify is v30, released on September 24, 2020.

  • Introducing dhcpleased(8)

    Now enabled by default on OpenBSD -current is dhcpleased(8), a dynamic host configuration protocol daemon written by florian@ (Florian Obser), who spoke with us about his work: [...]

My Fanless OpenBSD Desktop

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BSD

After the disappointment of my X1 Nano and learning that all future Intel “Evo”-branded laptops would lack S3 suspend, I started thinking about returning to my M1 MacBook full-time or building an OpenBSD desktop. I chose the latter, building my first desktop machine in many years.

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NVMM Ported To DragonFlyBSD For Virtualization

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BSD

DragonFlyBSD has integrated the NetBSD Virtual Machine Monitor (NVMM) hypervisor that can be used with QEMU.

As of yesterday the initial NVMM port has landed within the DragonFlyBSD source tree for supporting NVMM for virtualization on this operating system long ago forked from FreeBSD. NVMM currently supports making use of AMD SVM and Intel VT/VMX for hardware accelerated virtualization.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • Steam Next Fest gets a fresh trailer ahead of the event on October 1 | GamingOnLinux

    Steam Next Fest is fast approaching with it set to go live on October 1 so Valve has made a fresh trailer to give a little tease on what to expect from it.

  • Repurposing the VFD unit from an old Epson POS display using Arduino | Arduino Blog

    For many makers, it’s always fun to take some piece of old technology and give it a new lease on life, especially when the item in question was destined for the landfill. This is what prompted Alastair Aitchison — better known on YouTube as Playful Technology — to grab a deprecated vacuum fluorescent display (VFD) module from an Epson point-of-sale device and interface it with an Arduino Nano as a real-time display. VFDs can be thought of as character LCDs, but rather than having many dot-matrix units that use the alignments of suspended crystals to block light, tiny phosphor crystals light up when a current is applied. The module isn’t driven directly by the Arduino Nano since it requires a far higher voltage so a special display controller chip is integrated, which receives commands/data over an RS-232 port and manipulates the onscreen graphics accordingly. This meant a MAX232 had to be used to convert the Nano’s 5V TTL voltage into the -15V to 15 range.

  • Unique Clock Doubles as a Development Board

    Most clocks these days have ditched the round face and instead prefer to tell time through the medium of 7-segment displays. [mihai.cuciuc] is bringing the round face to digital clocks with his time-keeping piece, MakeTime.

  • [IBM's IWB:] Why Our Judgements Are Often Flawed and What to Do About It

    A few weeks ago I listened to a very interesting Freakonomics podcast hosted by University of Chicago economist Steven Levitt. In the podcast, Why Our Judgment is Flawed — and What to Do About It, Levitt interviewed Daniel Kahneman about his recent book, Noise: A Flow in Human Judgement, co-authored with Olivier Sibony and Cass Sunstein. Kahneman is Professor of Psychology and Public Affairs Emeritus at Princeton University. In 2002, he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics “for having integrated insights from psychological research into economic science, especially concerning human judgment and decision-making under uncertainty.” Thinking, Fast and Slow, Kahneman’s 2011 bestseller, was about the major discoveries by psychologists and cognitive scientists that have led to our current understanding of judgement and decision-making over the past several decades. Up to the 1970s, the prevailing view among social scientists was that people are generally rational and in control of the way they think and make decisions. It was thought that people only departed from rational behaviors because powerful emotions like fear, hatred or love distorted their judgement. These assumptions were challenged by the pioneering research of Kahneman and his long time collaborator Amos Tversky, who died in 1996. In a series of experiments, they demonstrated that human behavior often deviated from the predictions of the previous rational models, and that these deviations were due to the machinery of cognition, that is, to the biases and mental shortcuts or heuristics that we use for making everyday decisions, rather than to our emotional state.

  • redhat subscription alternative | Local Repo

    we need to know although redhat provide open source software products for enterprises but it have payment subscription to install packages and updates in RedHat Enterprise Linux distribution and that supports diverse workloads in physical, virtualized and cloud environments , RHEL editions are available for servers, mainframe, SAP applications, desktops and OpenStack.

  • Running the AWSY benchmark in the Firefox profiler — Paul Bone

    The are we slim yet (AWSY) benchmark measures memory usage. Recently when I made a simple change to firefox and expected it might save a bit of memory, it actually increased memory usage on the AWSY benchmark. We have lots of tools to hunt down memory usage problems. But to see an almost "log" of when garbage collection and cycle collection occurs, the Firefox profiler is amazing. I wanted to profile the AWSY benchmark to try and understand what was happening with GC scheduling. But it didn’t work out-of-the-box. This is one of those blog posts that I’m writing down so next time this happens, to me or anyone else, although I am selfish. And I websearch for "AWSY and Firefox Profiler" I want this to be the number 1 result and help me (or someone else) out. The normal instructions

  • World Free Software Day: why it is celebrated today and what are the advantages of these programs [Ed: Automated translation]

    Linux, Firefox, WordPress and even the very popular Android are, each in their own way, examples of the software free. Today is celebrating the move that involves a specific way of distributing and using computer programs: just like every third Saturday in September since the Free Software Day. The event arose in 2004 and on the occasion it was held on August 28, but around 2006 the third Saturday of the ninth month of the year was set.

  • Why the Future of Database Management Lies In Open Source
  • AllAboutApps Disclosed a List of Top Drupal Web Development Companies in 2021

Kernel: Graphics and Linux M1 Support

  • AMD + Valve Focusing On P-State / CPPC Driver With Schedutil For Better Linux Efficiency - Phoronix

    As reported at the start of August, AMD and Valve have been working on Linux CPU performance/frequency scaling improvements with the Steam Deck being one of the leading motivators. As speculated at that time, their work would likely revolve around use of ACPI CPPC found with Zen 2 CPUs and newer. Published last week was that AMD P-State driver for Linux systems indeed now leveraging CPPC information. AMD formally presented this new driver yesterday at XDC2021.

  • DRM Driver Posted For AI Processing Unit - Initially Focused On Mediatek SoCs - Phoronix

    BayLibre developer Alexandre Bailon has posted a "request for comments" of a new open-source Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) driver for AI Processing Unit (APU) functionality. Initially the driver is catering to Mediatek SoCs with an AI co-processor but this DRM "APU" driver could be adapted to other hardware too. Alexandre Bailon sums up this DRM AI Processing Unit driver as "a DRM driver that implements communication between the CPU and an APU. This uses VirtIO buffer to exchange messages. For the data, we allocate a GEM object and map it using IOMMU to make it available to the APU. The driver is relatively generic, and should work with any SoC implementing hardware accelerator for AI if they use support remoteproc and VirtIO."

  • Apple M1 USB Type-C Linux Support Code Sent Out For Testing - Phoronix

    he latest patches sent out for review/testing on the long mission for enabling Apple M1 support on Linux is the USB Type-C connectivity. Sven Peter has sent out the initial USB Type-C enablement work for the Apple ACE1/2 chips used by Apple M1 systems. In turn this Apple design is based on the TI TPS6598x IP but various differences. The Linux kernel support is being added onto the existing TIPD driver.

Proprietary Security Issues

Audiocasts/Videos: GNU World Order, Sioyek, LUTs