Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

BSD

Audiocasts/Shows: Choose Linux, BSD Now and TLLTS

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD

NetBSD 9.0 available!

Filed under
BSD

Sixth months after the start of the release engineering process, NetBSD 9.0 is now available.

Since the start of the release process a lot of improvements went into the branch - over 700 pullups were processed!

This includes usbnet (a common framework for usb ethernet drivers), aarch64 stability enhancements and lots of new hardware support, installer/sysinst fixes and changes to the NVMM (hardware virtualization) interface.

We hope this will lead to the best NetBSD release ever (only to be topped by NetBSD 10 - hopefully later this year).

Read more

Also: NetBSD 9.0 Debuts As The "Best NetBSD Release Ever"

OpenSSH 8.2 was released on 2020-02-14.

Filed under
Security
BSD

It is now possible[1] to perform chosen-prefix attacks against the SHA-1 hash algorithm for less than USD$50K. For this reason, we will be disabling the "ssh-rsa" public key signature algorithm that depends on SHA-1 by default in a near-future release.

This algorithm is unfortunately still used widely despite the existence of better alternatives, being the only remaining public key signature algorithm specified by the original SSH RFCs.

Read more

Also: DragonFlyBSD Improves Its TMPFS Implementation For Better Throughput Performance

Audiocasts/Shows: Command Line Heroes, BSD Now and Linux Headlines

Filed under
GNU
Linux
BSD
  • Command Line Heroes season 4 episode 2: Mainframes

    The story of a small team of rebel employees at General Electric who built a mainframe that pushed computing from a niche market to the mainstream.

  • Kubernetes on bhyve | BSD Now 337

    Happinesses and stresses of full-time FOSS work, building a FreeBSD fileserver, Kubernetes on FreeBSD bhyve, NetBSD 9 RC1 available, OPNSense 20.1 is here, HardenedBSD’s idealistic future, and more.

  • 2020-02-13 | Linux Headlines

    IBM brings Kubernetes to the mainframe, PeerTube 2.1 is packed with polish, lazy image loading is slowly coming to Firefox, and find out which podcast was awarded Podcast of the Year.

Second (final) release candidate for NetBSD 9.0 available!

Filed under
BSD

Sixth months after the start of the release engineering process for 9.0, the second (and most likely final) release candidate is now available.

Shortly after the first release candidate had been published and feedback came it, it became clear that this was not going to be the final state of 9.0. In the end a lot of fixes were done, but we used the opportunity to also incorporate more hardware support (Pinebook Pro) and update a few components (dhcpcd, openssl).

We will be very restrictive with further changes and expect a quick and smooth release from this point on. Tentative release date is February 14, 2020.

Since the start of the release process a lot of improvements went into the branch - nearly 700 pullups were processed!

This includes usbnet (a common framework for usb ethernet drivers), aarch64 stability enhancements and lots of new hardware support, installer/sysinst fixes and changes to the NVMM (hardware virtualization) interface.

We hope this will lead to the best NetBSD release ever (only to be topped by NetBSD 10 - hopefully later this year).

Read more

Also: NetBSD 9.0 Coming Soon With 64-bit ARM, Updated ZFS, Hardware-Accelerated Virtualization

GhostBSD 20 - When there's something wrong with your Tux

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

In the Linux world, Arch is the great noob equalizer. But there's an ever more frightening beast in the forest. It's BSD, and even invoking its name can send the lesser man into despair. The simple truth of the matter is, throughout the nerdy circles of the world, BSD holds a respectable place as a stable, reliable workhorse. But it's never distinguished itself as a viable desktop alternative.

Over the years, I've dabbled in BSD quite some - you can check my UNIX reviews to figure out what gives. Sometimes, there would be this or that BSD flavor that surprised with its simplicity, but things would usually unravel at some point, whether it's hardware compatibility, disk-greedy partitioning, or perhaps the ease of everyday use. Then, recently, I came across GhostBSD, and it looks pretty and inviting. So let's see what gives.

Read more

BSD: HardenedBSD and AsiaBSDCon

Filed under
BSD
  • HardenedBSD Tor Onion Service v3 Nodes

    I've been working today on deploying Tor Onion Service v3 nodes across our build infrastructure. I'm happy to announce that the public portion of this is now completed. Below you will find various onion service hostnames and their match to our infrastructure.

  • The MWL 2020 Asia Tour

    Why do this trip, when I loathe travel? Over the last twenty years, I’ve promised several folks that I would one day attend AsiaBSDCon. I keep my promises. I’m looking forward to being there, but not to getting there. The Bangalore trip is serendipitous. Presenting technology is how I built my career. Bangalore is a technology center and obviously a place I should present in. HasGeek asked if I would be interested, I said “if you could put an event by AsiaBSDCon,” and those folks actually went and did it. I’m simultaneously amazed and honored that they’ve gone to such trouble.

BSD: HAMMER2 and First FreeBSD Conference in Australia

Filed under
BSD
  • HAMMER2 questions

    Still, my recommendation is that for anything that fits on one drive no mirroring or RAID should be used. Make discrete backups to another drive on a regular schedule instead. RAIDs are not actually any more reliable than non-RAID on small systems in terms of machine uptime. For larger many-drive arrays HAMMER2 just isn't the right solution (not yet) and I would recommend running ZFS on FreeBSD instead. But for any single-drive solution (even a large one), HAMMER2 gives premium performance and has a number of extremely useful features built-in such as automatic de-duplication (when copying a large file or tree), and compression. I use HAMMER2 on a bunch of 4TB HDDs and SSDs myself and it works flawlessly.

  • The first FreeBSD conference in Australia

    While there are many prominant Australian FreeBSD contributers, sysadmins, and users, we’ve always had to venture overseas for conferences. We’re always told Australians are among the most ardent travellers, but I always wondered if we could do a domestic event as well.

    And on Tuesday, we did! Deb Goodkin and the FreeBSD Foundation graciously organised and chaired a dedicated FreeBSD miniconf at the long-running linux.conf.au event held each year in a different city in Australia and New Zealand.

OPNsense 20.1 “Keen Kingfisher” and OPNsense 19.7.10 Released

Filed under
OS
Security
BSD

  • OPNsense 20.1 “Keen Kingfisher” released

    For over 5 years now, OPNsense is driving innovation through modularising and hardening the open source firewall, with simple and reliable firmware upgrades, multi-language support, HardenedBSD security, fast adoption of upstream software updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing.

    20.1, nicknamed "Keen Kingfisher", is a subtle improvement on sustainable firewall experience. This release adds VXLAN and additional loopback device support, IPsec public key authentication and elliptic curve TLS certificate creation amongst others. Third party software has been updated to their latest versions. The logging frontend was rewritten for MVC with seamless API support. On the far side the documentation increased in quality as well as quantity and now presents itself in a familiar menu layout.

    Download links, an installation guide[1] and the checksums for the images can be found below as well.

  • OPNsense 19.7.10 released

    Hey hey,

    As Thursday nears the last preparations for 20.1 are underway. As a quick
    relief here is the End-Of-Life release of the 19.7 series with a tiny number
    of updates.

    Remember that when 20.1 is available it will take up to a day before we
    release the hotfix with the major upgrade path enabled. Please be patient
    as we simply want to ensure that upgrades will not be bumpy affair.

    Here are the full patch notes:

    o firewall: fix a typo in CARP validation
    o firmware: revoke 19.1 fingerprint
    o ipsec: add configurable dpdaction (contributed by Marcel Menzel)
    o mvc: BaseListField ignoring empty selected field
    o plugins: os-haproxy 2.20[1]
    o plugins: os-mail-backup 1.1[2]
    o plugins: os-nrpe 1.0 (contributed by Michael Muenz)
    o plugins: os-theme-rebellion 1.8.3 (contributed by Team Rebellion)
    o plugins: os-vnstat 1.2[3]
    o plugins: zabbix4-proxy 1.2[4]
    o ports: ca_root_nss 3.49.1
    o ports: curl 7.68.0[5]
    o ports: urllib3 1.27.7[6]
    o ports: isc-dhcp 4.4.2[7]

    Stay safe,
    Your OPNsense team

FreeBSD Quarterly Report

Filed under
BSD
  • FreeBSD quarterly report for the period October 2019 - December 2019

    Here is the last quarterly status report for 2019. As you might remember from last report, we changed our timeline: now we collect reports the last month of each quarter and we edit and publish the full document the next month. Thus, we cover here the period October 2019 - December 2019.

    If you thought that the FreeBSD community was less active in the Christmas' quarter you will be glad to be proven wrong: a quick glance at the summary will be sufficient to see that much work has been done in the last months.

  • FreeBSD Had A Very Busy End Of Year 2019 With Numerous Advancements

    The FreeBSD project has issued their last quarterly status update for 2019.

    During Q4-2019 were many improvements to the FreeBSD project itself and related BSD ecosystem. Some of their happenings for Q4 included:

    - Delivering the successful FreeBSD 12.1-RELEASE in early November.

    - Support for newer Intel WiFi chipsets. As part of that, WiFi now works on the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon 7th Gen laptop which is the laptop FreeBSD Foundation is aiming for good BSD support.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Programming: LLVM, Rust, Python and More

  • LLVM Adds MLIR-Vulkan-Runner To Run MLIR On Vulkan-Enabled GPUs

    For those out of the loop, MLIR is a new intermediate representation (IR) in the LLVM ecosystem that has grown immensely in popularity since Google developers announced it last year. MLIR was designed as a machine learning IR for the likes of TensorFlow and has seen significant adoption by the LLVM ecosystem in working out well for heterogeneous hardware among other advantages over the traditional LLVM IR. The mlir-vulkan-runner added to the LLVM source tree today is an execution driver for executing MLIR files on Vulkan by translating MLIR modules into SPIR-V for execution on GPUs while the host portion is converted to LLVM IR and JIT'ed on the system. This is similar to the MLIR CUDA runner that has already existed for NVIDIA platforms.

  • LLVM Clang 11 Adds -std=c++20 Support

    With C++20 now being deemed complete from the recent ISO C++ meeting in Prague, the GNU Compiler Collection went ahead and added the -std=c++20 flag where as up until that change this weekend relied upon the -std=c++2a switch. LLVM's Clang compiler now has similar treatment on its codebase. Like GCC, the LLVM Clang C++20 support isn't yet complete but it's working towards that milestone. But with C++20 now deemed complete and set to formally be out in the coming months during the 2020 year, the developers are comfortable exposing it now as -std=c++20 as the target. Additionally, LLVM Clang has shifted its C++2A references in their code-base to C++20. The old C++2A switch will still be an accepted argument for compatibility purposes.

  • Daily life with the offline laptop

    I will go fast on this. My set up is an old Apple Powerbook G4 with a 1024x768 screen (I love that 4:3 ratio) running OpenBSD.

    The system firewall pf is configured to prevent any incoming connections, and only allow TCP on the network to port 22, because when I need to copy files, I use ssh / sftp. The /home partition is encrypted using the softraid crypto device, full disk encryption is not supported on powerpc.

    The experience is even more enjoyable with a warm cup of tea on hand.

  • The Computer Scientist Responsible for Cut, Copy, and Paste, Has Passed Away

    Born in 1945 in New York, Tesler went on to study computer science at Stanford University, and after graduation he dabbled in artificial intelligence research (long before it became a deeply concerning tool) and became involved in the anti-war and anti-corporate monopoly movements, with companies like IBM as one of his deserving targets. In 1973 Tesler took a job at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) where he worked until 1980. Xerox PARC is famously known for developing the mouse-driven graphical user interface we now all take for granted, and during his time at the lab Tesler worked with Tim Mott to create a word processor called Gypsy that is best known for coining the terms “cut,” “copy,” and “paste” when it comes to commands for removing, duplicating, or repositioning chunks of text.

  • This Week In Rust: This Week in Rust 326
  • Using Python and GNU Octave to plot data

    Data science is a domain of knowledge that spans programming languages. Some are well-known for solving problems in this space, while others are lesser-known. This article will help you become familiar with doing data science with some popular languages.

  • Python while Loop

    Loops are one of the fundamental concepts of programming languages. Loops are handy when you want to repeat a specific block of code a number of times until a given condition is met. There are two basic loop constructs in Python, for and while loops. This tutorial covers the basics of while loops in Python. We’ll also show you how to use the else clause and the break and continue statements.

  • Stop Installing Python Packages Globally — Use Virtual Environments

    Python virtual environments allow you to install Python packages in an isolated location for a particular application, instead of installing them globally. Let’s explore what the advantages are and how you can quickly get started.

Proprietary Software Leftovers

  • GOWIN Semiconductor Adds Ubuntu Support to their GOWIN EDA FPGA Software for Improved Artificial Intelligence and IoT Development Toolchain Integration

    Traditional FPGAs have had a long history of development tool support for Windows and Red Hat, but in many cases lacked universal Linux support for other distributions such as Ubuntu. This has caused development burdens as Ubuntu has matured and become the most commonly supported operating system for Artificial Intelligence solution development. Neural network model development software such as Caffe, Tensorflow and Keras have found Ubuntu as the preferred operating system due to its open source support and scripting capabilities. As a result, having GOWIN’s FPGA EDA in the same operating system allows developers to seamlessly integrate FPGA synthesis, place and route and bitstream generation into their AI design and script work flows.

  • Kentucky official: Foreign actors, including Russians, North Koreans, target election system

    Previous attacks on election systems by foreign actors in the 2016 election focused on state-level systems, which have since beefed up security, though Dearing told legislators that "we’re now seeing those bad actors target the county level.”

  • New Workload Automation Platform Available on Linux and Windows Servers
  • War With Netflix and Disney Looms for India’s Top Local Streamer

    As global streaming giants Netflix Inc. and Walt Disney Co. spend millions of dollars to grab viewers in India, a country that could become their biggest overseas market, a homegrown rival is preparing to defend its turf.

    Zee5, the top domestic streaming platform set up by India’s biggest television broadcaster, is betting on local content to fend off big-spending rivals, Chief Executive Officer Tarun Katial said in an interview. The over-the-top, or OTT, service is playing to its advantage by adding more local-language shows and lower-price options to gain market share, he said.

  • DHS’s cyber wing responds to ransomware attack on pipeline operator [iophk: Windows TCO]

    The Department of Homeland Security’s cybersecurity agency recently responded to a ransomware attack on a natural gas compression facility that led the organization to shut down its operations for two days, the agency said Tuesday.

    The [attackers] were able to encrypt data on the organization’s IT and “operational technology” network, a broad term for a network that oversees industrial processes. No longer able to read data coming from across its enterprise, the facility shut down its various assets, including its pipelines, for two days.

  • Alert (AA20-049A): Ransomware Impacting Pipeline Operations [iophk: Windows TCO]

    CISA responded to a cyberattack affecting control and communication assets on the operational technology (OT) network of a natural gas compression facility. A cyber threat actor used a Spearphishing Link [T1192] to obtain initial access to the organization’s information technology (IT) network before pivoting to its OT network. The threat actor then deployed commodity ransomware to Encrypt Data for Impact [T1486] on both networks. Specific assets experiencing a Loss of Availability [T826] on the OT network included human machine interfaces (HMIs), data historians, and polling servers. Impacted assets were no longer able to read and aggregate real-time operational data reported from low-level OT devices, resulting in a partial Loss of View [T829] for human operators. The attack did not impact any programmable logic controllers (PLCs) and at no point did the victim lose control of operations. Although the victim’s emergency response plan did not specifically consider cyberattacks, the decision was made to implement a deliberate and controlled shutdown to operations. This lasted approximately two days, resulting in a Loss of Productivity and Revenue [T828], after which normal operations resumed. CISA is providing this Alert to help administrators and network defenders protect their organizations against this and similar ransomware attacks.

  • Chinese-linked [cracking] group using Windows backdoors to go after gambling industry targets

    A nation-state actor that has links with Chinese [attackers] is exploiting two new backdoors to run a cyber-espionage campaign against gambling entities in Southeast Asia, according to Trend Micro research.

    The new activity, which is also reportedly occurring in Europe and the Middle East, was first unearthed last year when cybersecurity consultancy Talent-Jump Technologies found a Microsoft Windows backdoor and contacted Trend Micro while conducting incident response for a company based in the Philippines.

New ISOs for Slackware Live (liveslak 1.3.5)

I have uploaded a set of fresh Slackware Live Edition ISO images. They are based on the liveslak scripts version 1.3.5. The ISOs are variants of Slackware-current “Tue Feb 18 05:20:50 UTC 2020” with the 5.4.20 kernel but without PAM. The PLASMA5 variant is my february release of ‘ktown‘ aka KDE-5_20.02 . Download these ISO files preferably via rsync://slackware.nl/mirrors/slackware-live/ (or its mirror rsync://slackware.uk/people/alien-slacklive/ but allow that 24 to sync up) because that allows easy resume if you cannot download the file in one go. Read more

LibreOffice 6.3.5 Released and LibreOffice 7 on the Way

  • LibreOffice 6.3.5 available for download

    The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 6.3.5, the 5th minor release of the LibreOffice 6.3 family, targeted at individuals using the software for production purposes, who are invited to update their current version. The new release provides bug and regression fixes, and improvements to document compatibility.

  • LibreOffice 6.3.5 Is Now Available for Download with 84 Bug Fixes

    LibreOffice 6.3.5 comes more than two months after the LibreOffice 6.3.4 update and it’s here to improve the overall stability, security and compatibility of the open-source and cross-platform office suite. A total of 84 bug and regression fixes are included in this maintenance update, which is still recommended to power users and technology enthusiasts, improving LibreOffice’s core components. The full changelogs are available for tech-savvy users here and here.

  • LibreOffice 7 Continues Plumbing Its Vulkan Rendering Support

    Landing last November in the LibreOffice development code was Skia drawing support to replace Cairo and in turn that opens up for Vulkan rendering of this cross-platform, open-source office suite. Skia+Vulkan is working out for LibreOffice and in fact the debut version that was going to be LibreOffice 6.5 was renamed to LibreOffice 7.0 as the current version now under development following the recent LibreOffice 6.4 release.