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BSD

You should be running a pfSense firewall

Filed under
Security
BSD

Those of us who work in the depths of high technology are not immune to the age-old adage of the shoemaker’s children having no shoes. We probably have the most technologically advanced homes of anyone we know, but we also tend to leave various items alone if they’re not causing problems. After all, that’s what we deal with at work. Who needs to saddle themselves with network upgrade projects at home when nothing’s broken?

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Get started with FreeBSD: A brief intro for Linux users

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BSD

Among the legions of Linux users and admins, there seems to be a sort of passive curiosity about FreeBSD and other *BSDs. Like commuters on a packed train, they gaze out at a less crowded, vaguely mysterious train heading in a slightly different direction and wonder what traveling on that train might be like -- for a moment. The few who cross over find themselves in a place that is equal parts familiar and foreign. And the strange parts can be scary.

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OpenBSD Laptop

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BSD

I have been meaning to give OpenBSD a try for a while now. What has been attracting me to this operating system was: the big emphasis on security while still being functional, the urge to try another unix-like operating system that is not Linux, and of course Puffy. Here I will be going through the steps I took towards learning about OpenBSD and getting it running on my laptop. I hope that you can take bits and pieces out of this post to help you with your learning experience when you decide it is your time to venture off into the BSD world.

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LibreSSL 2.1.2 released

Filed under
Security
BSD

We have released LibreSSL 2.1.2, which will be arriving in the LibreSSL directory of your local OpenBSD mirror soon.

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FreeNAS 9.3 Released

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BSD

Here’s an early Christmas present for you all: FreeNAS 9.3!

This FreeNAS update is a significant evolutionary step from previous FreeNAS releases, featuring a simplified and reorganized Web User Interface, support for Microsoft ODX and Windows 2012 clustering, better VMWare integration, including VAAI support, a new and more secure update system with roll-back functionality, and hundreds of other technology enhancements. We’re quite proud of it and excited to make it publicly available.

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Video: FreeBSD - The Next 10 Years

Filed under
Movies
BSD

Jordan Hubbard... should need no introduction but if you don't know who he is, look him up... anyway, Mr. Hubbard spoke recently at the MeetBSD 2014 conference giving a presentation entitled, "FreeBSD: The next 10 years".

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Nzega’s Digital Library Becomes a Reality

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BSD

We installed the FreeBSD operating system on each of the workstations. FreeBSD is an open source derivative of Unix that is renowned for its speed, customizability and rock-solid stability. We also installed a variety of open source software packages from a repository that we created on the Mini. The second Mini serves as a backup and content mirror, which we aim to sync once per year with new material and as needed.

For both teachers it was their very first exposure to FreeBSD. They enjoyed the control and customizability of the installation process, as well as the wide availability of open source software packages in the repository (more than 20,000).

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64-bit ARM FreeBSD Support Is Taking Shape

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BSD

While Linux/Android on AArch64 is what's usually talked about, FreeBSD developers continue making progress on porting their kernel to 64-bit ARM.

For months FreeBSD developers have been eying 64-bit ARM and the kernel code is taking shape. In a status update posted on Monday, FreeBSD/ARM64 is now booting up into single-user mode on ARM's reference simulator. Work is still underway on porting the remaining kernel drivers and getting the 64-bit ARM userland support in shape.

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DragonFlyBSD 4.0 Drops i386 Support, Improves Graphics

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BSD

The much anticipated release of DragonFlyBSD 4.0 is now available.

The biggest "big ticket item" of DragonFlyBSD 4.0 include improving graphics support with the Linux-ported Intel DRM driver now handling Intel "Haswell" graphics complete with OpenGL support, well more than one year after it's been optimized for Linux users. DragonFlyBSD 4.0 is also significant in that it drops 32-bit i386 support in making it 64-bit only for x86 systems. While the DRM driver porting takes a while across all BSD distributions right now, at least DragonFlyBSD developers can take a stand for pushing forward and focusing on 64-bit support rather than 32-bit.

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PC-BSD 10.1 review

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Reviews
BSD

The last PC-BSD release I reviewed was the 9.1 edition, and that was back in December 2012 (see PC-BSD 9.1 preview). That’s almost two years ago, But that’s because I’ve been very disappointed with subsequent releases after that, so I never bothered to write another review, though I was each testing each release privately.

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More in Tux Machines

2014: A Banner Year for Open Source

Open source was initially adopted for low cost and lack of vendor lock-in, but customers have found that it also results in better innovation and more flexibility. Now it is pervasive, and it is challenging proprietary incumbents across technology categories. It is not only mainstream, open source is truly leading innovation in areas like cloud, mobile, big data, the Internet of Things, and beyond. As we embark on a new year, I cannot help but reflect on the speed with which technology is changing. Rapidly delivering technology is about much more than just the technology – it is about people and culture. More than ever, this is why executives are looking at key technology companies – including Red Hat – as their partner instead of as a vendor. Read more

IsoHunt releases roll-your-own Pirate Bay

Open Source Meritocracy Is More Than a Joke

In January 2014, Github removed the rug in its office's waiting room in response to criticism of its slogan, "United Meritocracy of Github." Since then, the criticism of the idea of meritocracy has spread in free software circles. "Meritocracy is a joke," has become a slogan seen on T-shirts and constantly proclaimed, especially by feminists. Such commentary is true — so far as it goes, but it ignores the potential benefits of meritocracy as an ethos. Anyone who bothers to look can see that meritocracy is more of an ideal than a standard practice in free software. The idea that people should be valued for their contributions may seem to be a way to promote fairness, but the practice is frequently more complicated. Read more Also: Unmanagement and unleadership

Linux Kernel Developers Consider Live Kernel Patching Solution

kPatch and kGraph may soon enable live kernel updates on all Linux distributions, making it possible to apply security and other patches on the open source operating system without rebooting. Read more