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4 Best Practices for Web Browser Security on Your Linux Workstation

Filed under
Linux
Security
Web

There is no question that the web browser will be the piece of software with the largest and the most exposed attack surface on your Linux workstation. It is a tool written specifically to download and execute untrusted, frequently hostile code.

It attempts to shield you from this danger by employing multiple mechanisms such as sandboxes and code sanitization, but they have all been previously defeated on multiple occasions. System administrators should learn to approach browsing websites as the most insecure activity you’ll engage in on any given day.

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Chrome 58 Released

Filed under
Google
Web
  • Stable Channel Update for Desktop

    The Chrome team is delighted to announce the promotion of Chrome 58 to the stable channel for Windows, Mac and Linux. This will roll out over the coming days/weeks.

  • Chrome 58 Makes Its Debut

    Not long after the Firefox 53 release, Google has promoted Chrome 58 to stable.

    Chrome 58 is now available with a number of fixes, new features, and a number of security fixes too. A list of the CVE fixes can be found in the release announcement.

  • Google Promotes Chrome 58 to Stable Channel with 29 Security Fixes, Improvements

    Google announced a few moments ago the promotion of the Chrome 58 web browser to the stable channel for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.

Web/Browsers

Filed under
Web
  • Weblate 2.13.1

    Weblate 2.13.1 has been released quickly after 2.13. It fixes few minor issues and possible upgrade problem.

  • Vivaldi 1.9 Development Continues, Web Browser Now Based on Chromium 58

    We told you last week that development of the Vivaldi 1.9 web browser kicked off in style with the first snapshot, which brought numerous improvements to existing features, as well as some new ones.

    At the request of many users, Vivaldi 1.9 will let you shuffle the order of your extensions, and today's Vivaldi 1.9.811.13 snapshot is here to make it easier to fine tune screenshots taken with the built-in screenshot tool, but also to improve the URL autocomplete functionality and the Chromecasting Tab.

  • Google deprecates Octane JavaScript benchmark, because everyone is basically cheating

    Google has announced that its widely used Octane JavaScript benchmark is being retired, with Google saying that it's no longer a useful way for browser developers to determine how best to optimize their JavaScript engines.

    Octane was developed for and by the developers of V8, the JavaScript engine used in Chrome. It was intended to address flaws in the earlier SunSpider benchmark, developed by Apple's Safari team. SunSpider's tests were all microbenchmarks, sometimes testing something as small as a single operation performed thousands of times. It wasn't very representative of real-world code, and it was arguably being gamed, with browser vendors introducing optimizations that were aimed primarily, albeit not exclusively, at boosting SunSpider scores. This was being done even when those optimizations were detrimental to real-world performance, because having a good score carried so much prestige.

  • Chrome 59 To Support Headless Mode

    Chrome 59 stable isn't expected until early June, but when this release comes it will bring with it an interesting feature: a headless mode.

    Chrome's headless mode is made for headless/server environments, such as where you may automatically want to be capturing screenshots of rendered pages, etc. This is very practical for automated testing. Or there's the use-case of just wanting to interact with the DOM but not caring about presenting the contents on any connected physical display.

3 open source boilerplate web design templates

Filed under
OSS
Web

In the olden days, creating a website from scratch was easy.

With a basic understanding of HTML, and maybe a little CSS, you could put together a pretty functional web page with very little effort. Throw it onto your web server, and you were good to go.

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Vivaldi and Opera Web Browsers

Filed under
Web

Vivaldi 1.8

Filed under
OSS
Web

Plesk teams with Kolab for open source groupware

Filed under
OSS
Web

Plesk, one of the major providers of website management solutions, has chosen Kolab Systems’ groupware solution for its millions of users.

"You can now deploy Kolab in your Plesk installation with the Premium Email powered by Kolab extension. this extension is a step forward in the field of turn key groupware and online collaboration software. This package is easy and convenient to deploy — it can literally be installed in a few clicks, and it provides full Kolab functionality without the inconveniences and potential pitfalls of having to install Kolab from the ground up," said Kolab Systems in a press release.

This deal shows us why smart companies put their eggs in the open source basket instead of relying on proprietary solutions.

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Chromium and Chrome

Filed under
Google
OSS
Web
  • Chromium Rolls Out Enhanced GTK3 Theme Support

    Chromium is sporting greater GTK3 support in its latest daily development snapshots. Developers have begun building the browser with proper GTK3 theme integration enabled by default. I know: hardly ground breaking, but as Chromium (and its more popular sibling, Google Chrome) are widely used by Ubuntu users, it’s a change worth a note.

  • Chrome 58 Beta: IndexedDB 2.0, an improvement to iframe navigation, and immersive full screen for PWAs

    The IndexedDB 2.0 standard is now fully supported in Chrome, making it simpler to work with large data sets in the browser. IDB 2.0 features new schema management, bulk action methods, and more standardized handling of failures.

  • Chrome 58 Beta Supports IndexedDB 2.0, New Developer Features

    Google developers are busy today not only with the Android O Developer Preview but the Chrome team has delivered the first public beta for the upcoming Chrome 58.0.

    The Chrome 58 beta adds full support for IndexedDB 2.0, improvements to iframe navigation by adding a new sandbox keyword to control iframe top navigation behavior, immersive full-screen support for Progressive Web Apps (PWAs), and various other developer changes.

Chrome and Firefox

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF
Web

Tor Browser 6.5 Gets First Point Release to Support Tor 0.2.9.10, OpenSSL 1.0.2k

Filed under
OSS
Web

The Tor Project announced the immediate availability of the first point release of the Tor Browser 6.5 stable branch of the open-source, Firefox-based anonymity web browser with enhanced security and privacy features based on Tor.

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More in Tux Machines

Bloomberg's big move on machine learning and open source

With its orange text on black interface and colour coded keyboard, the Bloomberg professional services terminal – known simply as ‘The Terminal’ – doesn’t appear to have changed much since it was launched in the early ’80s. But behind the retro (Bloomberg prefers ‘modern icon’) stylings, its delivery of financial markets data news, and trading tools has advanced rapidly. The terminal’s 315,000 subscribers globally are now able to leverage on machine learning, deep learning, and natural language processing techniques developed by the company, as they seek an edge in their investment decisions. Bloomberg is also applying those same techniques to its internal processes. Leading the company’s efforts in the area is Bloomberg’s head of data science Gideon Mann, who spoke with CIO Australia earlier this month. [...] Behind much of Bloomberg’s recent builds has been an open source ethic. Mann says there has been a sea change within the company about open source. "When the company started in 1981 and there really wasn't a whole lot of open source. And so there was a mentality of you know if it's not invented here we're not interested,” Mann says. [...] The organisation took some convincing, but, championed by the CTO, there has been a “huge culture change” towards open source. “There are two groups you got to convince: you’ve got to convince management that using open source is going to be safe and lead to better software, and then you also have to convince engineers that using open source is going to increase their skillset, will lead to software that’s easier to maintain and is less buggy and it's going to be a more beautiful system. Once you can kind of convince those two then you're set,” Mann says. The company is an active contributor to projects including Solr, Hadoop, Apache Spark and Open Stack. Read more Also: Uber Open Sources AthenaX, Its Streaming Analytics Platform

Firefox 57 - Trick or Treat?

The best way to describe Firefox 57 is too little, too late, but better later than never. In a way, it's a pointless release, because it brings us back roughly where Firefox was and should have been years ago. Only all this time in between was wasted losing user base. WebExtensions will be the thing that makes or breaks the browser, and with insufficient quality in the available replacements for those that don't make the culling list, there will be no real incentive for people to stay around. Firefox 57 is better than earlier versions in terms of looks and performance, but that's like saying you get 50% discount on a price that is twice what it should be. Ultimately unnecessary, just like graduating from university by the age of 68. There aren't any major advantages over Chrome. This is essentially a Firefox that sucks less. So yes, on the positive side, if you do want to continue using Firefox, version 57 makes much more sense than the previous 53 releases. It has an almost normal look, some of the sorely needed security & privacy addons are available, and it offers a passable user experience in terms of speed and responsiveness. Bottom line, I will stick with Firefox for now. As long as my extensions keep working. Take care. Read more

Android Leftovers

The origin and evolution of FreeDOS

Over the years, developers have shared with me how they use FreeDOS to run embedded systems. My all-time favorite example is a developer who used FreeDOS to power a pinball machine. FreeDOS ran an application that controlled the board, tallied the score, and updated the back display. I don't know exactly how it was built, but one way such a system could work is to have every bumper register a "key" on a keyboard bus and the application simply read from that input. I thought it was cool. People sometimes forget about legacy software, but it pops up in unexpected places. I used to be campus CIO of a small university, and once a faculty member brought in some floppy disks with old research data on them. The data wasn't stored in plaintext files, rather as DOS application data. None of our modern systems would read the old data files, so we booted a spare PC with FreeDOS, downloaded a shareware DOS program that could read the application data, and exported the data to plaintext. Read more