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Reviews

Google Nexus 6P review: Android M and camera steal the show

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Reviews

So should you shell out your hard-earned money for the Nexus 6P? If you call yourself an Android lover, I would say the new Nexus 6P is worth the upgrade.

It’s got a premium body, a stunning camera, one that is perfect for snapping memories of your get togethers without any low-light worries and yes it comes with latest version of Android. As far as premium goes, the Nexus 6P offers the entire experience, and unlike other premium devices, does not cost a bomb.

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Plasma 5 — a review

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KDE
Reviews

I have been using opensuse Leap 42.1 on my main desktop for a little over a week. So I now have a better feel for Plasma 5, than I had from periodic testing. So it’s time for me to give my opinion on Plasma 5.

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Purism's Librem 13 Linux Laptop Is Sleek, Private and Secure

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Linux
Reviews

Purism began shipping the Librem 13 laptop last month. The Librem 15 started shipping this month November. Both laptops run a specially developed Linux OS with a kernel free of non-free software components.

That homegrown refined Linux OS, dubbed PureOS, is designed to address user concerns about identity theft, Internet privacy, security and digital rights. It is the first high-end Linux laptop built on tailor-made hardware to ensure privacy and compliance with the Free Software Foundation's endorsement, according to Todd Weaver, CEO of Purism Computer.

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BlackBerry Priv review: Android fixes the OS, but the hardware can’t compete

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Android
Reviews

From BlackBerry's perspective, the company is in way better shape with the Priv than it was with any of its BB10 devices. It can't stand up to the competitive Android smartphone market, but it is at least a livable smartphone that you could make do with. Maybe BlackBerry will convince some enterprise customers to buy a few Privs for their business, but for normal consumers, there is nothing compelling here. The Nexus 6P has better specs, a better camera, an aluminum body, and stock Android with updates direct from Google. It's also $200 less than the Priv. There is still no reason to buy a BlackBerry.

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Android Wear Review: 4G-Support FINALLY Confirmed

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Android
Reviews

Many were hoping that Android Wear would signal the true start of the smartwatch revolution, and while Google's effort is easily the best we've seen so far in this particular field, there are issues that could prevent it from catching on in the way some have predicted.

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Fedora 23 (GNOME) Review: Well, it’s Little Complicated

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GNOME
Reviews

Fedora 23 arrived a week later than originally planned, just like Fedora 22. While there are couple of Fedora spins, featuring popular desktop environments, for the past couple of days, I’ve been using the main release which is based on GNOME Shell (3.18).

It’s true that GNOME 3.18 comes with many subtle refinements and features, but one of these features (a major one unfortunately) looked confusing to me, just like I find it difficult to cope with the default desktop layout of GNOME3, which is why I only use the ‘Classic Desktop Session’ as it resembles the old GNOME2 desktop (well, to a certain degree). Fedora 22 also had let go of one majorly useful utility (systemd’s ‘readahead’ component) and unfortunately, Fedora 23 too comes without it.

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Also: Schedule of Fedora 24 published

Rolling and tumbling

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GNU
Linux
Reviews

Recently I realized that it has been over 5 years I’ve been using Arch Linux continuously, one one or two of my computers. I have been using it in professional environment on my laptop and my workstation; I have been using it as a “home entertainment platform”, as it were, and as a family computer. This makes Arch Linux the distribution I’ve been using the most and for the longest period of time. Only Debian comes close with four years. I have also used Fedora, OpenSuse, Mandriva (OpenMandriva, Mageia and Mandrake/driva Linux as well), Ubuntu, Elementary, and I’ve tested several others, from the rather exotic ones to the most common distros.

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Reviewing Ubuntu 15.10, Fedora 23, and openSUSE Leap 42.1...at the same time!

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Reviews

So, instead of writing a review of each of these new releases, I am simply writing one article comparing all three of them as desktop workstations (I won't be reviewing them as servers in this article). A battle royale. A no-holds-barred cage match. A Linux Distro Thunderdome. Or a friendly tea amongst three friends. Call it what you will…it means I only need to write one article instead of three. So I like the idea.

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openSUSE Leap 42.1 Review: The Most Mature Linux Distribution

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Reviews
SUSE

What makes this release even more important is that with Leap, SUSE and openSUSE have finally come together. With this release openSUSE will start using the same code which is being used in SLE. So technically you are running the 'community' version of SLE.

Leap 42.1 is based on the Service Pack 1 (SP1) of SLE 12, which will be released soon. Leap will follow SLE’s release cycle so there won’t be the regular 9-month release, instead a new version of openSUSE Leap will be released when the new version of SLE is due.

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Android Wear Review: Coming Along Nicely...

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Android
Reviews

Many were hoping that Android Wear would signal the true start of the smartwatch revolution, and while Google's effort is easily the best we've seen so far in this particular field, there are issues that could prevent it from catching on in the way some have predicted.

The reliance on voice commands is arguably the biggest sticking point. Despite the hype behind products such as Google Now, Siri and Cortana, very few people feel comfortable using speech to control their phones when in public – and it often doesn't take that much longer to access the information you need using your touchscreen anyway.

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