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Reviews

MKVToolNix Review - Powerful Tool to Split, Merge, and Convert MKV Files

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Reviews

MKVToolNix is a set of tools that can be used on MKV files, which is a video format that grows ever more present in our daily lives. The application falls into a very crowded niche, and there is not much competition for it. Nonetheless, it's a useful app, and it would be nice to take a closer look at it.

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HP ProBook 455 G2: A low-cost business notebook for Ubuntu lovers [Review]

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Most of the laptops you can buy come with Windows pre-installed. Obviously the latest batch have Windows 10 on them, with more being announced daily. If you prefer Linux you can either replace Microsoft's operating system with your distro of choice, or set up a dual boot configuration.

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3 Twitter Clients For Linux That You Don't Want To Miss

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Linux
Reviews
Ubuntu
HowTos


3 twitter clients for linux and more

Do you use Twitter? Ofcourse. Do you access twitter through web browser to get notifications? Yes. Then you are missing out some great apps that can provide you the same features as web twitter client. There are numerous of twitter clients for Linux that notify on the desktopwhenever something happens on twitter. I'm compiling a list of 3 twitter clients for Linux that you will find very useful. So let's get started!

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Review: Ubuntu 15.04

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Reviews
Ubuntu

Perhaps that’s a sign that it’s time for Canonical to take the opposite tack to Microsoft and move to less frequent releases, or at least less arbitrarily timetabled ones. Ubuntu is stable enough now not to need constant updating, and in this case waiting on the Linux 4 kernel would have made for a much more compelling release. Canonical’s engineers, meanwhile, could benefit from spending more time working on long-promised upgrades, and less time patching and polishing half-baked versions of things for a biannual release.
If you’re looking for a free, friendly and powerful OS for desktops and servers, Ubuntu is still an easy Linux distribution to recommend. But even for established Ubuntu users this update is neither practically nor emotionally compelling. If Canonical seriously wants Ubuntu to make more of a mainstream impact, Ubuntu 15.04 – a barely necessary update rolled out to serve a timetable rather than a strategy – is precisely the sort of thing it needs to stop releasing.

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An Everyday Linux User Review Of Android x86 - Release 4.4 r3

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Android
Reviews

This review might not be very long but I have spent a long time playing and experimenting with Android x86 and if you stick with it and are willing to play with settings then you may get something close to desirable.

Those who will get the most out of Android x86 will be using a computer with a touchscreen.

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BackBox 4.3 review: Not just for penetration tests and security assessments

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Reviews
Ubuntu

BackBox is a Linux distribution that’s based on Ubuntu and designed for conducting “penetration tests and security assessments”.

If you’re not familiar with the distribution, this brief review will give you an idea what else it can be used for other than being an OS for pentesters.

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POLL - 5 Best Linux Desktop Environments With Pros & Cons

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Linux
Reviews


favorite linux desktop environment

I am sure all of you remember the 7/7/2015 post 5 Best Linux Desktop Environments With Pros & Cons. We all discussed the post in the comments and I really appreciate that LinuxAndUbuntu readers took part in discussion, mentioned their favorite(s) DE and also took poll. Today I'm going to reveal the poll taken by our readers and also the most liked DE in Comments.

Read At LinuxAndUbuntu

Linux Mint 17.2: tried and tested is never bested

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Reviews

When I booted into Linux Mint, I immediately saw how mature and smooth the distribution was. It was a breeze to open files, switch between windows and even type, with a GUI which didn’t look like it was designed in the 1990s. The high level of theme customisability and the gorgeous wallpaper selection enthralled me, and impressed me enough to make it the sole operating system on my old laptop.

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Android auto review: A beautiful, but beta alternative to awful OEM solutions

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Android
Reviews

Infotainment systems are actually the worst part of a modern car. In fact, a study by Nielsen and SBD Consultancy found the systems in new cars to be the biggest cause of customer complaints. Much like during the beginnings of the modern smartphone, the car infotainment trend takes a bunch of manufacturers that traditionally have only made hardware and asks them to create software. It should be no surprise that they are terrible at it. (And that says nothing of their typical sloth-ish product cycles.)

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Android TV Review: Just What Your TV Doesn't Need

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Android
Reviews

The latest Android-based smart TV platform – cunningly called Android TV – is by my reckoning Google’s third stab at becoming a force to be reckoned with in the smart TV world. Actually its fourth if you also include the early and little-seen Android 4.2 Jelly Bean effort introduced on a few high-end Philips TVs in a handful of European territories last year.

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Open spec SBC dual boots Android and Ubuntu on hexa-core RK3399

T-Firefly is Kickstartering the first hacker SBC with Rockchip’s Cortex-A72/-A53 RK3399. The Firefly-RK3399 has up to 4GB DDR3, M.2, and USB 3.0 Type-C. T-Firefly, which offers Linux- and Android-ready open source boards like the Firefly-RK3288 and sandwich-style Firefly-RK3288 Reload, both of which are based on the quad-core, Cortex-A17 Rockchip RK3288, has advanced to a more powerful Rockchip SoC for its new open spec Firefly-RK3399. The hexa-core Rockchip RK3399 features two server-class Cortex-A72 cores clocked to up to 2.0GHz, as well as four Cortex-A53 at up to 1.42GHz. This appears to be the first RK3399 SBC and the first SBC to include Cortex-A72 cores. Read more

Leftovers: Software

  • Manuskript is a Promising Open-Source Scrivener Alternative
    Whether you plan to work on a book, a screenplay, or better structure your dissertation, you’ll probably see apps like Scrivener recommended. If you’re running Windows, macOS or even Android then you’re spoilt for choice, with various competing proprietary apps at varying price points readily available. On Linux the choices are somewhat limited.
  • Tor 0.2.9 Is Just Around the Corner As 0.2.8.10 Fixes Memory Leak in OpenSSL 1.1
    The past weekend brought us new stable and development builds of the Tor anonymity network project, versioned 0.2.8.10, as the most advanced version out there, and 0.2.9.6 RC (Release Candidate).
  • Pitivi 0.98 Linux Video Editor Adds Customizable Keyboard Shortcuts
    Version 0.98 of the GNOME-aligned GStreamer-powered Pitivi non-linear video editor was tagged today as the newest development milestone. The main feature addition of Pitivi 0.98 is now supporting customizable keyboard supports! Aside from finally supporting customizable keyboard shortcuts for this open-source video editor, a lot of warnings were fixed from GTK 3.22, and there has been a lot of other bug fixing. Bugs around Pitivi's timeline were primarily targeted by this release.
  • Phoronix Test Suite 6.8-Tana Officially Released
    Phoronix Test Suite 6.8.0 is now available as the latest version of our open-source, fully-automated, reproducible benchmarking software for Linux, BSD, Solaris, macOS, Windows, and other operating systems. Phoronix Test Suite 6.8 is the latest stable release now of our GPL-licensed benchmarking software updated on its regular quarterly release cadence. Phoronix Test Suite 6.8 development focused on a number of low-level improvements to particularly benefit Phoromatic and the Phodevi (Phoronix Device Interface) software/hardware library abstraction layer.
  • iPerf As Another Network Benchmark Is Now Available Via The Phoronix Test Suite
  • Chromium-Based Vivaldi 1.6 Browser Enters Development, Brings Tab Stack Renaming
    Vivaldi's Ruarí Ødegaard informs us about the availability of a new snapshot for the cross-platform, Chromium-based Vivaldi web browser, which promises to let users name tab stacks. Vivaldi Snapshot 1.6.682.3 marks the beginning of the development of Vivaldi 1.6, the next major version of the popular web browser, and it looks like it has been rebased on Chromium 55.0.2883.64. Besides fixing a bunch of regressions, the new development release implements an option under Settings -> Tabs -> Tab Features -> Tab stacking -> Allow Tab Stack Renaming, which lets you rename or name tab stacks.

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