Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Reviews

Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu Edition review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

IT'S NOT EVERY DAY that a smartphone crosses our desk running Canonical's open source Ubuntu operating system.

The Linux-based OS already commands millions of installations across desktops and tablets the world over, and makes a welcome change from the endless run of Android-based devices. Anticipation levels were therefore high and, on first impressions, we believed we were in the presence of a truly desirable smartphone.

Read more

Ubuntu bq Aquaris M10 Review Part 2: Software

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

In part one of our rather lengthy review, we took a look at the bq Aquaris M10 Ubuntu tablet's hardware. Suffice it to say, it perfectly played the role of a mid-range tablet. While the device had a few ups, like its lightweight design, bright display, and substantial battery, it would have been easily passed for a mediocre slab if not for the software running on it. In this round, we take a deeper look into what makes this tablet truly one of a kind, and almost literally too. This time, we take a dive into the alien world of Ubuntu Touch.

Read more

Kicking the Tires on Arch Based Antergos

Filed under
Reviews

We decided to take the Arch Linux based distribution Antergos out for a test drive. Here’s how it handled, out in traffic and on the track.

A few months back, a fellow tech writer mentioned in an email exchange that I might try using the Arch Linux based Antergos distro as a way to grab the latest and greatest versions of popular software titles for review. Mainly because of Arch’s community repositories, in which users suggest and vote on packages to be included, many popular software titles are available within days after a new release. And since Antergos is a simple install compared to Arch, it would be easy to quickly throw up an installation on a test machine just to look at the latest and greatest from LibreOffice, GIMP and the like.

Read more

Kubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus - Not meant to be

Filed under
KDE
Reviews

There's one thing that is consistent with the Xenial family of spring disappointments. The disappointment. When one goes bad, you know they all do, and in this regard, Ubuntu LTS delivers badly across its entire range. 16.04 was meant to be sweet hope, salvation and joy, it is just a string of rushed, badly QA-ed images.

Kubuntu Xerus does not have any redeeming factors. It's pretty all right, but it's buggy, Samba support is weak, smartphone support is sub-par, package management is atrocious, battery life is just average but still much worse than the spectacularly useless Werewolf release, and there are lots of other small problems everywhere. Nothing about this particular edition oozes confidence, quality or long-term vision. Really sad. 2/10. My weekend has been ruined again, thank you. Don't bother. Bye.

Read more

Ubuntu BQ Aquaris M10 Review – Part 1: Hardware

Filed under
Reviews

The mobile market today has practically been what former Microsoft-then-Nokia-then-Microsoft-again exec Stephen Elop loved to refer to as a two-horse race. Android and iOS have been butting heads quarter after quarter, year after year. Despite their popularity and ubiquity, neither is truly perfect and neither can really meet everyone's needs and preferences. Which leaves a little wiggle room for other platforms (that includes Windows 10) to try and fill in the gaps. This time around we are going to take a closer look at one the newer challengers, Ubuntu Touch, as it is embodied in the recent bq Aquaris M10 tablet. How does it fare against the bevy of Android, iOS, and even Windows tablets scattered throughout the market? And does it have what it takes to not only stand tall and proud but also to survive? Read on to find our verdict.

Read more

Hands on: What's new and noteworthy with Android N

Filed under
Reviews

With Google's I/O developers' conference behind us, it's time to start looking forward to what's next in the world of Android.

The most prominent thing is Google's rapidly approaching Android release, currently known only as Android "N." (The company has yet to reveal the full name or version number.) While the software itself isn't expected to arrive until sometime this summer, we're getting an increasingly clear picture of the fresh features and improvements it'll provide.

Read more

Meizu Pro 5 Ubuntu Edition review

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

The Meizu Pro 5 is the latest flagship smartphone to run on Canonical’s Ubuntu operating system. Ubuntu is designed to work across all device types – including mobile, tablets, convertibles and desktops – using a common core code. This is similar to Microsoft Windows 10 Mobile.

However, unlike Microsoft’s code, Ubuntu is totally open source and has largely been developed and improved by the desktop OS’s millions-strong user base. This means the OS is capable of evolving and changing at a great pace and has update cycles that would make most sysadmins weep.

Read more

CentOS 7 KDE: not for home users

Filed under
OS
Linux
Reviews

Whom can I recommend CentOS to? Probably to people I mentioned in the very beginning of this article: students who want to dedicate their life to system administration. You need to learn how to search for the answers, how to do things manually. That is your profession. That is your bread. CentOS gives you a brilliant opportunity to learn all of that along with learning the system itself.

But CentOS is not for home users who want things done quickly and easily, I'm afraid.

Read more

Google Nexus 6P Review: This is the Android Flagship You’re Looking For

Filed under
Android
Reviews

This is the flagship Android handset you’re looking for, and best of all it’s reasonably priced. It is unlocked and offers universal wireless carrier support (yes, including Verizon), and it starts at just $500. At that price, you have a choice of silver, graphite, frost, and matte gold finishes and 32 GB of storage. If you want to step up to 64 GB, which I recommend, the price jumps just $50 to $550. (Take that, Apple: A similarly configured iPhone 6S Plus costs $850, or $300 more than the Nexus 6P.) A 128 GB version will set you back an also-reasonable $650. These are fantastic prices for a fantastic flagship device.

And that, folks, is called the sweet spot. The Nexus 6P hits it, and while there are still some platform niceties that make me personally prefer the iPhone, the gap is now smaller than ever. The Nexus 6P is highly recommended.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

ZFS Fault Management Daemon Added To FreeBSD

The latest FreeBSD development code has integrated the zfsd daemon. ZFSD is the ZFS Fault Management Daemon. ZFSD deals with situations like drive faults in ZFS pools with hot-spares and replacements. This comes as the ZFS file-system support in FreeBSD continues to mature and is in quite a good state for ZFS outside of Oracle. Read more

ExTiX 16.3 LXQt Distro Is Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, Ships with Linux Kernel 4.6

ExTiX developer Arne Exton informs Softpedia today, May 30, 2016, about the immediate availability for download of the ExTiX 16.3 LXQt Edition computer operating system. Read more

today's leftovers

  • 6 Excellent Console Linux File Managers
    A console application is computer software which can be used with a text-only computer interface, the command line interface, or a text-based interface included within a graphical user interface operating system, such as a terminal emulator (such as GNOME Terminal or the aforementioned Terminator). Whereas a graphical user interface application generally involves using the mouse and keyboard (or touch control), with a console application the primary (and often only) input method is the keyboard. Many console applications are command line tools, but there is a wealth of software that has a text-based user interface making use of ncurses, a library which allow programmers to write text-based user interfaces.
  • PHP Tour 2016 Clermont-Ferrand
  • Enlightenment's EFL Getting New DRM Library
    Chris Michael of Samsung has been working on a new DRM library for the Enlightenment Foundation Libraries (EFL) with a number of improvements. The initial implementation of this new library, Ecore_Drm2, has been added to EFL Git.
  • Antergos 2016.05.28 Screenshot Tour
  • Gentoo Linux 20160514 Screenshot Tour
  • First coding week with openSUSE, Google Summer of Code
    Embedded below is the blog of Google Summer of Code student Martin Garcia Monterde. Martin detailed his first week coding with openSUSE and the Google Summer of Code.
  • OpenPHT 1.5.2 for Debian/sid
    I have updated the openpht repository with builds of OpenPHT 1.5.2 for Debian/sid for both amd64 and i386 architecture. For those who have forgotten it, OpenPHT is the open source fork of Plex Home Theater that is used on RasPlex, see my last post concerning OpenPHT for details.
  • vcswatch is now looking for tags
    About a week ago, I extended vcswatch to also look at tags in git repositories. Previously, it was solely paying attention to the version number in the top paragraph in debian/changelog, and would alert if that version didn't match the package version in Debian unstable or experimental. The idea is that "UNRELEASED" versions will keep nagging the maintainer (via DDPO) not to forget that some day this package needs an upload. This works for git, svn, bzr, hg, cvs, mtn, and darcs repositories (in decreasing order of actual usage numbers in Debian. I had actually tried to add arch support as well, but that VCS is so weird that it wasn't worth the trouble).

Google and Oracle