Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Reviews

Rejection report 3: Knoppix and Q4OS

Filed under
Reviews

I should be angry, but I'm not, because I'm resigned to the situation, and I can still write an article based on these negative findings. It ain't all lost. And out of wilderness, there cometh salvation. Or something.

Anyhow, some distros still don't like my G50 box, even in 2017. It's about time this changed permanently. But not all is lost. At the very least, Q4OS looks quite lovely, so there's something to do after this little fiasco. I may still be entertained, and in turn, you as well. For now though, if you're aiming for an UEFI setup, these two distros, plus the bunch listed in the previous two reports are probably less likely to give you love. Of course, there are workarounds, but that's not the point. And we are done here.

Read more

LibreOffice 5.3 – Freedom Meets Functionality

Filed under
LibO
Reviews

Freedom to create with code is not the same as the freedom to create a specific product. Sometimes the freedom offered in the open source community makes it easier for me to be more productive. Other times, not so much. The biggest excuses I have to grab one of my machines with a closed source operating system consists of the following photo editing (Adobe CC), video editing (Final Cut Pro), and Civilization IV. Yes, I’m still playing Civ IV. It’s my favorite. I don’t need to upgrade. I’d love to find a tutorial that worked to get it working under Neon, but sadly the community that would write such a post appears to have moved on.

I used to think that I couldn’t create documents under Linux but LibreOffice 5.3 has really been a game changer. Everyone else beat me to the flashy reviews, so this isn’t a review that exposes the new features. This is a commentary of my experience.

Read more

A Short Review of Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 Beta 1

Filed under
GNOME
Reviews
Ubuntu

If you curious about GNOME 3.22 and later, and about the next-release of Ubuntu GNOME, then it's good to see what's inside Ubuntu GNOME 17.04 "Zesty Zapus" pre-release. Here I write an overview of its Beta 1 release and showing some interesting aspects such as memory usage, new additions (Flatpak & Snappy), new features (Night Light etc.), and its default apps (LibreOffice 5.3 etc.). This Beta 1 is already very nice and exciting to use. I hope you enjoy Ubuntu GNOME 17.04.

Read more

A Short Review of deepin 15.4 GNU/Linux Beta

Filed under
Reviews

deepin 15.4 GNU/Linux will be released in April 2017. Here is a review of its Beta Version showing some interesting aspects: memory usage, new appearances, new programs, and more. This new 15.4 has big improvements in its user interface, making it more beautiful, plus a new program called Deepin Screen Recorder. It's very interesting for any GNU/Linux user to take a look. This review is a continuation of our previous review in 2016 for Deepin 15.3 GNU/Linux.

Read more

Gimp 2.8 Reviewed: Open-Source Photo Editor

Filed under
GNU
OSS
Reviews

Although its learning curve is too steep for novices, GIMP is free and has a nice set of photo editing tools within an open-source program that should appeal to geek photographers who like to control their editing environment.

Read more

antiX A Fast And Lightweight Linux Distribution

Filed under
Reviews

antiX is a fast and lightweight Linux distribution. It is based on Debian stable. antiX is a very different distro, it isn’t like Debian or Ubuntu. It doesn’t use systemd. Actually, most Linux distros are using systemd to manage the system processes, but antiX doesn’t like systemd.
I don’t have any problem with systemd, but time after analyze systemd, I realized that it is not the best way to replace SysVinit, because it doesn’t follow the UNIX philosophy. I think that systemd is very complex, maybe this is the reason for why antiX doesn’t use it.

Read more

Also: Chakra 2017.03 Goedel is released

Slackel Openbox Plays Hard to Get

Filed under
Reviews

Slackel's Openbox edition is a lightweight operating system that offers reliable performance once you get the box open. It is not an ideal OS for every user, though.

Slackel 6.0.8 Openbox, the latest version of the Greece-based project's lightweight distribution, was released by developer Dimitris Tzemos last fall.

Slackel is a Linux distro that offers several benefits for users who step away from the typical mainstream Debian-based Linux distros. Based on both Slackware and Salix, it offers a few advantages not usually found with the Slackware Linux lineup.

For example, Slackel is fully compatible with both Slackware and Salix software packages. The main difference is it includes the current version of Slackware and the latest version of KDE in the repository.

Read more

The Opening of the First KDE Slimbook

Filed under
KDE
Reviews
  • The Opening of the First KDE Slimbook

    Fresh off the production line from 101’s factory in València is the first KDE Slimbook which I opened today at FLOSS UK conference here in Manchester.

  • The First KDE Slimbook Unboxing Video Appears Online

    If you’ve been itching to see more of the KDE Slimbook, the ultra-thin laptop announced by Spanish company Slimbook back in January, then you’re in luck.

    KDE developer (and all-round awesome chap) Jonathan Riddell snagged some one-on-one time with the bespoke KDE-branded laptop at the FLOSS Spring 2017 conference taking place in Manchester.

    “Fresh off the production line from 101’s factory in València is the first KDE Slimbook which I opened today at FLOSS UK conference here in Manchester,” he writes in a short blog post.

Orion Ubuntu Laptop Review: The Powerful MacBook Pro Alternative

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

The choice of a new laptop for many consumers is still seen as the head-to-head comparison of Microsoft’s Windows 10 or Apple’s macOS. The third option of moving to a Linux-powered machine has always been a much trickier prospect. A dizzying range of Linux "flavors" coupled with the mysteries of hardware support stops many adept users from making the switch. What if you had an off-the-shelf approach to Linux hardware that just worked?

Read more

RunIQ review: New Balance goes after runners with Android Wear and Strava

Filed under
Android
Reviews

New Balance and Intel have teamed up to release one of the first new Android Wear watches of the year. The RunIQ fitness watch is a runner's companion that features built-in support for Strava, as well as New Balance's own running app. Since it has every necessary sensor you'd need to track a workout, it's also competing with the most equipped smartwatches on the market, including the Apple Watch Series 2, the LG Watch Sport, and even the Garmin Fenix 3 HR.

Stuffed with a GPS, optical heart-rate monitor, and more, the $299 RunIQ wants to be the smartwatch that runners choose to wear both on the trail and at the office. But just because it was developed by one of the biggest athletic apparel companies in the country doesn't mean it's the most valuable tool a runner could have.

Read more

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Linux Devices

Koozali SME Server 8.2 Reaches End of Life on March 31, Upgrade to Koozali SME 9

Koozali Foundation, through Terry Fage, announced the availability of a final set of updates for the Koozali SME Server 8.2 operating system, which will reach end of life this week. Patching some of the reported bugs, the new packages released today for Koozali SME Server 8.2 are e-smith-ibays-2.2.0-16.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, e-smith-manager-2.2.0-14.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-clamav-2.2.0-15.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-locale-*-2.2.0-56.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, and smeserver-yum-2.2.0-26.el5.sme.noarch.rpm. Read more

Development News

  • GCC for New Contributors
    I’m a relative newcomer to GCC, so I thought it was worth documenting some of the hurdles I ran into when I started working on GCC, to try to make it easier for others to start hacking on GCC. Hence this guide.
  • #1: Easy Package Registration
    Last month, Brian Ripley announced on r-devel that registration of routines would now be tested for by R CMD check in r-devel (which by next month will become R 3.4.0). A NOTE will be issued now, this will presumably turn into a WARNING at some point. Writing R Extensions has an updated introduction) of the topic.
  • Emacs as C IDE and JHBuild
    Although Builder clearly is The Future as GNOME IDE, I still all my coding in Emacs, mostly because I have been using it for such a long time that my brain is to all the shortcuts and workflows. But Emacs can be a good IDE too. The most obvious everyday features that I want from an IDE are good source code navigation and active assistance while editing. In the first category are tasks like jumping to symbol's definition, find all callers of a function and such things. For editing, auto-completion, immediate warnings and error reporting, semantic-aware re-factoring are a must. Specifically for GNOME related development, I need all this to also work with JHBuild.

Security News

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Cisco learned from Wikileaks that the CIA had hacked its systems
    When WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange disclosed earlier this month that his anti-secrecy group had obtained CIA tools for hacking into technology products made by U.S. companies, security engineers at Cisco Systems swung into action. The Wikileaks documents described how the Central Intelligence Agency had learned more than a year ago how to exploit flaws in Cisco's widely used Internet switches, which direct electronic traffic, to enable eavesdropping.
  • Exposed files on Microsoft's document-sharing site
    Confidential documents, passwords and health data have been inadvertently shared by firms using Microsoft's Office 365 service, say researchers. The sensitive information was found via a publicly available search engine that is part of Office 365. Security researchers said many firms mistakenly thought documents would only be shared with colleagues not globally. Microsoft said it would "take steps" to change the service and remove the sensitive data.
  • Russian Hacker Pleads Guilty for Role in Infamous Linux Ebury Malware
    The US Department of Justice announced yesterday that Maxim Senakh, 41, of Velikii Novgorod, Russia, pleaded guilty for his role in the creation of the Ebury malware and for maintaining its infamous botnet. US authorities indicted Senakh in January 2015, and the law enforcement detained the hacker in Finland in August of the same year.
  • Changes coming to TLS: Part One
    Transport layer Security version 1.3 (TLS 1.3) is the latest version of the SSL/TLS protocol which is currently under development by the IETF. It offers several security and performance improvements as compared to the previous versions. While there are several technical resouces which discuss the finer aspects of this new protocol, this two-part article is a quick reference to new features and major changes in the TLS protocol.