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More in Tux Machines

Liberating PCs and "Mac"-branded PCs

  • Reviving Old Macs Using Linux
    All Macintosh computers from about 2006 onwards were made using Intel CPUs and installing Linux on these computers is a breeze. You don’t need to download any Mac specific distro — just choose your favorite distro and install away. About 95 percent of the time you’ll be able to use the 64-bit version of the distro. On CoreDuo Macs, from 2006, you’ll need to use a 32-bit version. Here is a screencast video I made on a revived Macbook that came into my hands recently. I downloaded Linux Mint 18 Xfce 64-bit ISO, burned it to DVD, inserted it into the Macbook (after the Macbook was turned on) and then booted the Macbook from DVD by holding the the letter “C” (which tells the Mac to boot from the optical drive).
  • Linux breathes new life into old Mac computers
    Apple is known for its planned obsolescence strategy that encourages customers to upgrade their Macs every so often. This can result in older Macs that can't update to the latest version of macOS, but are still perfectly functional computers that can perform many everyday computing tasks such as web browsing, word processing, image editing, etc. So what can you do with an older Mac that no longer gets macOS updates? You can install Linux and breathe new life into that old Mac computer. Distributions such as Ubuntu, Linux Mint, Fedora and others offer a way to continue using an older Mac that would otherwise be cast aside.
  • The EFF Calls Out Microsoft's Ongoing Bullshit On Windows 10 Privacy Concerns
    While Windows 10 is generally well-liked by reviewers and users, it's relatively clear that it's not the OS to choose if you actually want to control how much babbling your OS does over the network. While a lot of complaints about Windows 10 have been proven to be hyperbole or just plain wrong (like it delivers your BitTorrent behavior to Hollywood or it makes use of menacing keyloggers), Windows 10 is annoyingly chatty, sending numerous reports back to Microsoft even when the operating system is configured to be as quiet and private as possible. While Microsoft has been criticized for this behavior for some time now, the general response out of Redmond has been to tap dance over, under and around most of the key complaints. Enter the Electronic Freedom Foundation, which last week effectively called on Microsoft to stop bullshitting everybody in terms of what gets collected and why. The EFF does a good job reiterating how Microsoft used malware-esque tactics to get users to upgrade, then once installed, Windows 10 collects user location data, text input, voice input, touch input, web browsing history, and general computing telemetry data, including which programs you run and for how long -- which would be arguably less of an issue if you had full control over how much of this data was collected and funneled back to the Redmond mothership.

Games for GNU/Linux

LinuxCon and Linux at 25

GNOME News

  • Wayland ♡ drawing tablets
    So this is finally happening. The result of much work all through the stack from several dedicated individuals (You know who you are!) started lining up during the past few months and now is hitting master. Early in the cycle I blogged about stylus support being merged, based on the first version of the tablet protocols. Now I have the pleasure to declare GTK+ tablet support on Wayland feature complete.
  • GNOME/GTK Support For Drawing Tablets On Wayland Is Feature Complete
    In time for next month's GNOME 3.22 release, the drawing tablet support for GNOME on Wayland is getting into shape. GNOME developer Carlos Garnacho wrote today how it's "finally happening" that good support for drawing tablets when running GNOME on Wayland is becoming a reality. Carlos declares that the GTK+ tablet support on Wayland is considered feature complete.
  • Mutter Window Manager Updated for GNOME 3.22 with Virtual Input Device Support
    GNOME Project's Florian Müllner announced the release of the Beta build of the upcoming Mutter window and compositing manager for the GNOME 3.22 desktop environment. As reported by us earlier today, the GNOME 3.22 desktop environment entered Beta stages of development, which means that most of its core components and applications have been updated to this Beta release, including Mutter, which is in charge of displaying and managing your GNOME desktop via OpenGL (accelerated 3D graphics).