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IBM/Red Hat: DevNation, Education and Matrix for Fedora

  • Cloud-native modernization or death? A false dichotomy - Red Hat Developer

    DevNation Tech Talks are hosted by the Red Hat technologists who create our products. These sessions include real solutions plus code and sample projects to help you get started. In this talk, you’ll learn about cloud-native modernization from Daniel Oh and Burr Sutter. Are you familiar with the tight coupling of applications with their underlying platform that makes change hard? Or, coupling that creates a lack of scalability, performance, and flexibility for existing applications built with legacy technology? How about the fact that re-architecting applications cannot be done overnight? If you say yes to any of these, you probably think that you have “cloud-native modernization or death.” But what if there is another way that shows you the incremental steps to refactor the application to microservices and make use of Kubernetes or Red Hat OpenShift to effectively deploy and manage it at scale on the cloud?

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  • Red Hat : Emerging Trends of Using Open Source Software in Education

    Traditionally, software has been classified into application system software and operating systems software. Application software facilitate users' work in executing routine processes while operating systems software is designed to make all the different hardware components, as well as all the peripherals, work together and operate as an integrated machine. Examples of modern operating systems software are various flavors of Microsoft Windows, and Red Hat Linux. The Microsoft Office Suite (with MS Word, MS Excel, MS PowerPoint, MS Access, and MS Publisher) are good examples of application software. Fact is, for almost every thinkable task under the sun, there exist an application software that can execute the task. Most software are proprietary and owned by somebody. To use it, one has to purchase it from the developer or a distribution point. Also, a user cannot modify the software code if it is proprietary. Software that fall in this category is classified as closed. A good example is Microsoft's products.

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  • Kevin Fenzi: Matrix and Fedora

    Recently the Fedora Council has been floating the idea of modernizing the Fedora community real-time chat platform (currently IRC hosted at freenode.net). The front runner is matrix. I last looked at matrix 4 or so years ago, so I thought it would be a good time to revisit it and see how it looks today. TLDR: I suspect we will have IRC and Matrix bridged together for a long time to come, if you are new user, use Matrix, if not keep using IRC. First a few words about IRC (Internet Relay Chat). IRC is a 30+ year old chat protocol. There’s tons of clients. There’s tons of bots and add-ons. There’s tons of gateways and aggregators. So, whats not to like? Well, everything is a add-on mish mash that can be very confusing and frustrating for new users. For example, IRC has no persistance, you only see messages while your client is connected. So, folks invented irc “bouncers” to connect for you to the IRC networks you care about and when you reconnect play back all the messages you missed. Authentication is via messaging various services bots. Encryption is via plugins or other add ons (and often not setup). So, most old timers have a client they have carefully tuned, a bouncer and a bunch of custom bots, which is fine, but new users (not surprisingly) find this all a hassle and frustrating. IRC also has it’s own culture and rituals, some of which still make sense to me, but others that don’t. Matrix on the other hand is pretty new (6 years). You can interact with it as a guest or have an account on a particular homeserver. If you have an account all your history is saved, and can be synced to your client on login. You can send pictures and moves and fancy gifs. You can (somewhat) have end to end encryption (see clients below) with encrypted rooms where the server can’t know what was said in the room. You can have ‘reactions’ to things people say. You can redact something you said in the past. You can have a nice avatar and a Real Name (if you like). You can join rooms/conversations with other matrix servers (for example the kde, mozilla and others are running servers). You can get read receipts to see who read your message and notifications when someone is typing (also client dependent see below). [...] The real question is how long should we keep the current situation with Matrix and IRC bridged? What advantages would be dropping the irc bridges bring? Right now, not too much. End to end encryption isn’t that interesting for an open source project. Reactions are interesting (think about using them to vote up or down proposals in meetings?), but we have done without them so far. I think migration from IRC is going to be a long process, nor is there great advantage to pushing things to go faster. I hope that over coming years matrix clients continue to get better and implement more features. Someday (probably years down the road) more Fedora users will be on Matrix than IRC, then sometime after that things will have shifted enough that the community will start assuming you are on Matrix.

RADV Vulkan Drive and Vulkan Improvements

  • RADV Vulkan Driver Enables NGG For AMD VanGogh APUs - Phoronix

    Up to now the Mesa Radeon Vulkan driver "RADV" has only enabled Next-Gen Geometry (NGG) support by default for discrete graphics cards. But now that requirement is lifted for supporting NGG on forthcoming GFX10.3 (RDNA 2) APUs. The forthcoming and very exciting VanGogh APUs will now see NGG enabled when running on the RADV Vulkan driver, similar to a previous change made for the RadeonSI Gallium3D OpenGL driver.

  • Vulkan Improvements & Fixes Land In FFmpeg - Phoronix

    Landing in FFmpeg this week were the first batch of Vulkan improvements since the prior big push in May. There are various fixes, changes to allow custom Vulkan device contexts, possible segmentation fault fixes, optionally enabling more Vulkan extensions for usage, supporting more pixel formats, improving the download/upload paths, and other work. Recent Vulkan changes to FFmpeg can be found via this GitHub search with the recent contributions by developer Lynne.

Minder – mind-mapping tool

Structured thinking is a process of setting a framework to an unstructured problem. Having a structure not only helps to understand a particular problem, it also helps to identify areas which need more understanding. Structured thinking allows us to map ideas in structured fashion, thereby enabling the identification of areas which require the most thought. Mind mapping is a fairly free flowing concept. This means you need software that is versatile, and can adapt to your requirements. Your idea of a neat and tidy mind map might be another person’s idea of bamboozling. A map can concentrate very complex content in a small space such as a piece of paper. It helps to use both sides of your brain: the logical side and also the creative side. It’s a technique to help organize the way you think and stimulate your creativity: It can help you by developing, sorting and helping to memorize your ideas. Mind mapping software therefore offers an excellent way of capturing your thoughts in a structured way, brainstorming new ideas. Move away from simple lists, and use this software to link ideas in different ways. By thinking creatively, not linearly, we can seize on our big ideas. Read more

Games: Godot Engine, Rail Route, MangoHud, Cube 2: Sauerbraten and Minigalaxy

  • Godot Engine getting plenty of major 2D advancements for the 4.0 release | GamingOnLinux

    Vulkan support is coming with Godot Engine 4.0 and with it plenty of modern 3D rendering features, however the 2D side of Godot is also seeing plenty of love. In a fresh blog post, lead developer Juan Linietsky went over some of the big stuff that will be coming and it all sounds quite impressive for this free and open source game engine. Performance is going to be improved, partly as a result of Vulkan with Linietsky mentioned as it has a "lower draw-call cost than OpenGL". However, that's not the only reason as they've done some dedicated improvements to optimize the 2D side including changes to enable "thousands of draw() functions from a node's _draw() callback" which will speed up both the GLES3 and GLES2 back-ends.

  • Rail Route is an upcoming train dispatcher simulator with a demo up | GamingOnLinux

    Think you have what it takes to control complex train routes? The train dispatcher simulator Rail Route looks thoroughly interesting, and you can even try an early demo. In the game you will be tasked with negotiating contracts, building railroads, setting up routes for trains and controlling the traffic. As you go you will unlock more features of the dispatcher interface, upgrade the railway network itself and add in a little automation.

  • Linux gaming overlay MangoHud gets fancy with new graphs in the latest release | GamingOnLinux

    Have a love of graphs? You will like the latest release of the Linux gaming overlay and benchmark tool MangoHud, as it's giving you even more details and control. MangoHud is a a Vulkan and OpenGL overlay for monitoring FPS, temperatures, CPU/GPU load and quite a lot more. It's quickly become the go-to for displaying and monitoring almost anything you need for Linux gaming and the 0.6.0 / 0.6.1 release that just went out has expanded what it can do even further. One of the major new features is the ability to reorder the HUD so you can have it in whatever order you like. So if you want the FPS and frame timing info first before your system readout, you can do that.

  • Classic FOSS FPS 'Cube 2: Sauerbraten' sees the first release since 2013 | GamingOnLinux

    Cube 2: Sauerbraten lives again it seems! The classic free and open source first-person shooter, which combines old school gameplay with in-game map editing returns. For newer players: this is not another game based on old open source id Software tech though, as the engine supporting it is original and open source under the ZLIB license. Going by their release history the 2020_11_29 edition is the first since early 2013. That is a long time for fans to wait for a new release. Pretty amazing to see it come back in such a huge way too, as this is not a small release. Oh no, it's a big one. Bringing with it tons of new maps (nearly 200!), it also has plenty of technical changes too. It now uses the modern SDL 2, masses of bug fixes due to the time since the last release, chat names are now team coloured, there's optional HUDs for score / game clock and an ammobar, there's health bars for teammates, support for JPEG screenshots, lots of new textures and skyboxes, a revamped and more intelligent spawn system, various new server and user options you can tweak, improved water quality and the list goes on.

  • Minigalaxy the simple GOG client for Linux has a big 1.0 release | GamingOnLinux

    Need help managing your GOG games on Linux since GOG Galaxy is not supported? Minigalaxy is an option that focuses entirely on GOG and it has a new release out. While there's also Lutris which had a big upgrade recently too, it's quite a lot more complicated compared with Minigalaxy. The idea behind it is simple: to just get you up and running on Linux with your GOG games. It doesn't really need to be any more complicated and for that - it works really well.