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HHVM 3.27 Released

Programming/Development: C++, 'Agile', and Pronghorn, a Java framework

  • What's all the C Plus Fuss? Bjarne Stroustrup warns of dangerous future plans for his C++
    Earlier this year, Bjarne Stroustrup, creator of C++, managing director in the technology division of Morgan Stanley, and a visiting professor of computer science at Columbia University in the US, wrote a letter inviting those overseeing the evolution of the programming language to “Remember the Vasa!” Easy for a Dane to understand no doubt, but perhaps more of a stretch for those with a few gaps in their knowledge of 17th century Scandinavian history. The Vasa was a Swedish warship, commissioned by King Gustavus Adolphus. It was the most powerful warship in the Baltic Sea from its maiden voyage on the August 10, 1628, until a few minutes later when it sank.
  • Has Agile Programming Lost its Way?
    Programmers are passionate about which development methodology is the best. Is it Agile? Waterfall? Feature Driven Development? Scrum? So everyone took notice when one of the 17 authors of the seminal Agile Manifesto wrote a blog post last month headlined “Developers Should Abandon Agile.” Further down in his post, Ron Jeffries made a clear distinction between Manifesto Agile — “the core ideas from the Manifesto, in which I still believe” — and its usurping follower, “Faux Agile” (or, in extreme cases, “Dark Agile”). Jeffries ultimately urged developers to learn useful development methods — including but not limited to Extreme Programming — that are true to the Manifesto’s original principles, while also detaching their thinking from particular methodologies with an Agile name.
  • Write fast apps with Pronghorn, a Java framework
    In 1973, Carl Hewitt had an idea inspired by quantum mechanics. He wanted to develop computing machines that were capable of parallel execution of tasks, communicating with each other seamlessly while containing their own local memory and processors. Born was the actor model, and with that, a very simple concept: Everything is an actor. This allows for some great benefits: Separating business and other logic is made vastly easier. Security is easily gained because each core component of your application is separate and independent. Prototyping is accelerated due to the nature of actors and their interconnectivity.
  • Systems Languages: An Experience Report
    Recently, there’s been a lot of turmoil in the systems language community. We have the Rust Evangelism Strikeforce nudging us towards rewriting everything in Rust. We have the C++17 folks who promise the safety and ease of use of modern programming languages with the performance and power of C. And then there’s a long tail of other “systems” programming languages, like Nim, Reason / OCaml, Crystal, Go, and Pony. Personally, I’m super excited we’re seeing some interesting work in the programming language theory space. This got me excited to learn more about what’s out there. A lot of the problems I solve are usually solved in C. Recently, Go has begun to encroach on C’s territory. I enjoy C and Go as much as the next person — They’re good languages for getting shit done. Often times, they leave a lot to be desired, and leave me envious of other programmers with tools like Flow, Typescript, and Dialyzer. Coming from developing in Erlang, even with its rudimentary type system, functional programming just came far more easily to me.

Software: Brackets, WebArchives, KDE Plasma Vault, Bustle and Linux Instant Messaging Clients

  • Open Source Web Design Editor Brackets 1.13 Released
    The latest Brackets 1.13 release brings new features, like the ability to opening remote files, drag and drop support for the FileTreeFiew, an option to automatically update Brackets, and bug fixes. Brackets is a free, open source editor focused on web development / design, created by Adobe. The editor is available on Mac, Windows and Linux, and what makes it special is its live HTML, CSS and JS editing / preview.
  • Browse Wikipedia Offline With WebArchives For Linux
    WebArchives is a web archive reader for Linux desktops which provides the ability to browse articles offline from websites such as Wikipedia or Wikisource, in multiple languages. The application is useful for those without a permanent Internet connection or those using metered connections - the offline sources can be downloaded at a friend's house, copied on a USB stick, and imported into WebArchives. Or maybe you want to do some research somewhere up in the mountains where there's no Internet. No problem, install WebArchives and download the Wikipedia source on your laptop before you go. After downloading a source, no Internet connection is needed to read, search and browse Wikipedia. The software supports reading ZIM files, an open file format that stores wiki content for offline usage, and it offers download links for a large number of sources, including Wikipedia, Stack Exchange sites (including Code Review, Super User, AskUbuntu, Bitcoin, etc.), ArchWiki, RationalWiki, TED talks, Vikidia, WikiMed Medical Encyclopedia, Wikinews, Wikisource, and many others.
  • Testing KDE Plasma Vault on openSUSE Leap 15
    KDE Plasma Vault is a wonderful application. It works as advertised and is another killer feature for the KDE Plasma desktop environment. I highly encourage you to give it a try on openSUSE Leap 15.
  • Bustle 0.7.1: jumping the ticket barrier
    Bustle 0.7.1 is out now and supports monitoring the system bus, without requiring any prior system configuration. It also lets you monitor any other bus by providing its address, which I’ve already used to spy on ibus traffic.
  • Best Free Linux Instant Messaging Clients
    Instant messaging (IM) is a form of real-time communication between two or more individuals based on typed text. The text is conveyed via devices connected over a network such as the Internet. There are so many different instant messaging clients available, some software supports multiple protocols, others confine themselves to supporting a single protocol only. To provide an insight into the quality of software that is available, we have compiled a list of 13 high quality open source Linux IM clients. Hopefully, there will be something of interest here for anyone who wants to converse with their family, friends, colleagues, and clients.

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