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Ubuntu Leftovers

Server: MAAS, OPNFV, 'DevOps', and Docker

  • MAAS KVM Pods
    OpenStack is the dominant solution in the IaaS space, fueled by the need for reliable, scalable and interoperable private cloud infrastructure to accommodate cloud native applications. Through OpenStack’s open APIs, tenants can easily deploy elaborate virtual (overlay) networks, integrate with a variety of storage backends, even leverage modern hypervisor-like machine containers (LXD) for bare metal performance. Although the tooling allows a full fledged OpenStack deployment on just a single machine, the intrinsic efficiencies that OpenStack’s design promises, materialize at a certain scale — typically at least 12 servers.
  • DevOps for NFV: OPNFV Infrastructure and Continuous Integration
    In this article series, we have been discussing the Understanding OPNFV book. Previously, we provided an introduction to network functions virtualization (NFV), discussed the role of OPNFV in network transformation, and looked at how OPNFV integrates and enhances upstream projects. We continue our series with in-depth insight into the OPNFV DevOps toolchain, hardware labs, continuous integration (CI) pipeline, and deployment tools (installers) from chapters 6 and 7 of the book.  
  • A Chat with Chef about the DevOps Movement and Habitat Builder
    Last week at our annual user conference, Node.js Interactive, we announced several new members to the Node.js Foundation. One of the members that joined is Chef. Chef works with more than a thousand companies around the world to deliver their vision of digital transformation. We sat down with the team at Chef to talk about how Node.js fits within the DevOps movement, why they joined the Node.js Foundation, and also about a new offering from the group called Habitat Builder.
  • Why Use Docker with R? A DevOps Perspective
    There have been several blog posts going around about why one would use Docker with R. In this post I’ll try to add a DevOps point of view and explain how containerizing R is used in the context of the OpenCPU system for building and deploying R servers.
  • Docker on Docker at DockerCon EU 17
    Docker Inc. the company behind the open-source Docker container technology doesn't just build docker, it also used the same technology to power its own services.

Software: Narabu, Network Monitors, Mailutils, Rubik’s Cube, VirtualBox

  • Introducing Narabu, part 1: Introduction
    Narabu is a new intraframe video codec, from the Japanese verb narabu, which means to line up or be parallel. Let me first state straight up that Narabu isn't where I hoped it would be at this stage; the encoder isn't fast enough, and I have to turn my attention to other projects for a while. Nevertheless, I think it is interesting as a research project in its own right, and I don't think it should stop me from trying to write up a small series. :-)
  • 3 Simple, Excellent Linux Network Monitors
  • Mailutils Version 3.3 available
    Mailutils version 3.3 is available for download. See the NEWS file, for information about changes in this version.
  • Now You Can Play Rubik’s Cube Puzzle In Terminal
    Rubik’s Cube game needs no introduction, right? It is a 3-D combination puzzle game invented by Ernő Rubik, a Hungarian sculptor and professor of architecture, in 1974. It is one of the best puzzle game invented so far to enhance the problem-solving skills of the kids and adults. If you’re one Rubik’s Cube lover, you don’t need to buy it online or from a shop. You can play it right from the Terminal. A fellow Developer has created an utility called “NRubik”. It is an N-Curses based, virtual Rubik’s Cube written in Python. If you’re a hardcore CLI user who lives on Terminal all day, NRubik will certainly make your time useful.
  • VirtualBox 5.2 Debuts Officially with Support for Exporting VMs to Oracle Cloud
    To everyone's surprise, Oracle announced today the final release of the VirtualBox 5.2 open-source and cross-platform virtualization software for all supported platforms, including GNU/Linux, macOS, Windows, and Solaris. VirtualBox 5.2 is a massive update bringing a revamped and more modern graphical user interface (GUI) based on recent Qt5 technologies, as well as powerful new features that will help you with all of your virtualization tasks. One of these new features is the ability to finally export and store virtual machines into the cloud. Oracle has made it possible to export VMs to its Oracle Cloud (OPC) public cloud service, allowing users to easily deploy virtual machines across multiple VirtualBox installations. Imagine you no longer have to export a VM to an external drive to import it on another computer, just download it from the Oracle Cloud.

MongoDB IPO