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Security Leftovers

  • Unhinged Linux backdoor still poses a nuisance, if not a threat
    If successfully planted, the malware tries to register itself in the system as a daemon (system service). Thereafter it uses LZO compression and the Blowfish encryption algorithm to chat to command and control servers. Every packet contains a checksum, so that the recipient could verify data integrity.
  • Researchers analyze faulty new Linux backdoor
  • Seven things security experts do to keep safe online
    Cybersecurity experts aren’t like you or I, and now we have the evidence to prove it. Researchers at Google interviewed more than 200 experts to find out what security practices they actually carry out online, and then spoke to almost 300 non-experts to find out how they differ.
  • Why Chrysler's car hack 'fix' is staggeringly stupid
    More than a million Chrysler vehicles, including Jeeps, Ram pickups, and Dodge vehicles, are vulnerable to a major vulnerability that could drive them -- literally -- off the road. Last week, the company recalled 1.4 million vehicles at risk of a remote hijack vulnerability, which, as detailed by Wired, can result in a hacker remotely operating the brakes, interfering with the driver's visibility by switching on the windshield wipers, and even shutting off the engine.
  • The Elderly & the Scam Masters
    Jane answered the phone and a pleasant young man identified himself as an internet technician with Microsoft. He told her they’d received a report that something was extremely wrong with their computers and he was calling to help. [...] From here it gets crazy. There was a $200 payment made to this “tech expert” and then he calls back and says that payment wasn’t necessary. In fact, an error was made and a draft of $2,000 had been made and not $200. He needed to take his $1,800 back. Of course, the “bank statement” Jane looked at did indeed show $2,000 instead of $200, so Jane was being asked to refund the $1,800.
  • We Can Put An End To Identity Theft
  • Darkode Hacking Forum Taken Down by FBI and Europol
    In a joint operation that included law enforcement agencies from 20 countries, the infamous Darkode hacking forum has been taken down.
  • ​Stagefright: Just how scary is it for Android users?
    To do this with Android Kitkat, the most popular Android version, you open the Messenger app and tap on the menu at the top right corner of the screen (the three vertical dots) and then tap on Settings. Once there, select Block Unknown Senders, and you're done.
  • Bin your Android phone: 1 BILLION mobes can be infected by text message
    (There are a couple of workarounds: one is to root your Android mobile and disable Stagefright. Another is to remove or disable Google Hangouts, the default messaging app on Android, which processes video messages automatically. Even without Hangouts, if you receive a booby-trapped MMS and accidentally view it, you'll still be infected. Finally, you could tweak your carrier settings to not receive MMS texts.)
  • 950 million Android phones can be hijacked by malicious text messages
    Interestingly, the Stagefright vulnerability also affects Firefox on all platforms except Linux, and that includes the Firefox OS. Firefox developers have patched the vulnerability in versions 38 and up.
  • Researchers have found a new texting vulnerability in Android

LibreOffice 5.0 to Bring Better Support for Special Scientific Formats

The fourth Release Candidate for LibreOffice 5.0 has been released by The Document Foundation and it looks like the development cycle is coming to an end. Read more

Open source software is the only way to keep up

Between 2005 and 2010, software development accelerated so quickly that some said open source had won the corporate market. But it didn't stop there. In 2015, surveys showed that companies were using, supporting, and creating more open source software. If we look at this pattern, then we can see open source will just keep growing. It's not going anywhere. If you're not using, contributing, or supporting it, then you're going to be left behind. Read more

Following Debian's GNU/Hurd in 2015

The Debian project is best known for its stable GNU/Linux operating system, a platform which is used as a base by over one hundred distributions. However, the Debian project is home to other operating systems, including a port of GNU's Hurd. The GNU/Hurd port combines Debian packages and package management with GNU userland software running on GNU's microkernel. The project offers this description: "The Hurd is a set of servers running on top of the GNU Mach microkernel. Together they build the base for the GNU operating system. Currently, Debian is only available for Linux and kFreeBSD, but with Debian GNU/Hurd we have started to offer GNU/Hurd as a development, server and desktop platform, too. We hope to be able to release Debian GNU/Hurd for Wheezy." Read more