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Linux Devices

  • The Scooter Computer
    Power consumption, as measured by my Kill-a-Watt, ranged from 7 watts at the Ubuntu Server 14.04 text login screen, to 8-10 watts at an idle Ubuntu 15.10 GUI login screen (the default OS it arrived with), to 14-18 watts in memory testing, to 26 watts in mprime.
  • H3-OLinuXino-NANO is only 50×50 mm but has everything one computer must have
  • Hands on with the Pine64… well sorta
    While I refuse to call this board a ‘supercomputer’ as they do on their Kickstarter page, I do think it will be a great little development board for a lot of people. While I personally prefer the Odroid product line, I think this is a great way for people who have only worked on the Raspberry Pi and other various ‘Fruit Board Clones’, to spread the wings and work with a lot more powerful hardware. While I think I will personally put my money into the forthcoming Odroid C2 for size reasons, I still think the Pine64 is a great board for many people.
  • Can open source chip cores ever threaten ARM in the IoT?
    The open source movement now dominates software, but could it also become the norm in chips? Operating systems like Unix, which could be licensed for many computers, squeezed out single-vendor platforms, but then gave way in turn to fully open source OSs like Linux.
  • How MaruOS Turns Your Android Phone Into A Linux Desktop Computer
    As soon as you connect an external HDMI monitor to your phone, MaruOS fires a Debian-based OS on the bigger screen. “Your phone runs independently of your desktop so you can take a call and work on your big screen at the same time,” MaruOS writes on its website.

Leftovers: OSS

  • Because You Don’t Need Eyes To Have A Vision
    Continuing the MyStory series on It’s FOSS, today I am sharing with you the story of a blind computer programmer from Iraq who goes on the internet by the name of Ali Miracle. By the time you finish reading this article about Ali and his works, I am sure you would agree with his nickname ‘miracle’. I came to know about Ali when he contacted me to contribute to It’s FOSS. This was also the time when I come to know about his inability to see. I was amazed to know that despite being blind, Ali contributed to a number of open source projects.
  • What success really looks like in open source
    Linux, and the related open source projects making up the LAMP stack, were the underdogs. Essays like Raymond’s helped legitimize Linux and galvanize support for open source in a world where closed source was still the norm.
  • The Surprising Truth about Big Data
    Big Data gets a lot of headlines. If any technology can be called heavily hyped, Big Data earns the prize for most breathless predictions of enterprise influence. Typical of the rosy predictions is this from IDC: spending on Big Data-related infrastructure, software and services will grow at a torrid compound annual rate of 23.1 percent between 2014 and 2019, reaching a hefty $48.6 billion in 2019.
  • 80 percent of UK IT professionals plan to move to OpenStack cloud
    The report also suggested that the biggest concerns facing those advocates centre around security and the challenge of installing the cloud in their business. "There is no question that private clouds are seen as the future for many enterprise workloads, including many that are considered to be business-critical," said Mark Smith, senior product marketing manager of cloud solutions at Suse, in a not at all brazen plug for his business.
  • Hadoop vs. Spark: The New Age of Big Data
    A direct comparison of Hadoop and Spark is difficult because they do many of the same things, but are also non-overlapping in some areas. For example, Spark has no file management and therefor must rely on Hadoop’s Distributed File System (HDFS) or some other solution. It is wiser to compare Hadoop MapReduce to Spark, because they’re more comparable as data processing engines.
  • OpsClarity Promises Easier Big Data Management for DevOps
    What will it take to make open source big data tools truly useful for the enterprise? OpsClarity thinks the answer is a one-stop solution for monitoring everything from Spark to Elasticsearch to MongoDB. That's what it rolled out this week in a new platform targeted at DevOps teams.
  • Bug squashing in Gammu
    I've not really spent much time on Gammu in past months and it was about time to do some basic housekeeping. It's not that there would be too much of new development, I rather wanted to go through the issue tracker, properly tag issues, close questions without response and resolve the ones which are simple to fix. This lead to few code and documentation improvements.
  • Deep Introduces deepSQL and Combines SQL with Cloud
    Called deepSQL, the solution aims to help companies meet real-time customer demands while providing the automated scalability to capitalize on unforeseen business surges. “We took control of our destiny by making this our own distribution. It is fully 100% MySQL compliant, there are now application changes but it’s the best of Maria, Percona, MySQL, our own stuff and the machine learning open source worlds together,” said Chad Jones, chief strategy officer at Deep.
  • OpsClarity Provides Monitoring for Open-Source Data-First Apps
    OpsClarity Intelligent Monitoring provides automated discovery, configuration and rapid troubleshooting for Apache Kafka, Apache Spark and Apache Storm. OpsClarity, which provides Web-scale application monitoring solutions, has announced that its Intelligent Monitoring offering now provides monitoring for a growing suite of open-source data processing frameworks.
  • Walmart has made its application development cloud platform to open source
    Customers that think of Walmart as the place to get toiletries, groceries and more can now add cloud to the list. Perhaps taking a page out of Amazon’s success with AWS, the retail giant has announced it is releasing its internally-developed cloud and application lifecycle management platform, called OneOps, open source to the public.
  • LLVM Clang Compiler Optimization Benchmarks From -O0 To -O3 -march=native
  • EC accepts XBRL as standard for procurement
    The freely-available standard, developed by the not-for-profit XBRL Consortium, was accepted by the Commission after consulting the European multi-stakeholder platform (MSP) on ICT standardisation and other experts.
  • Reclaiming the Computing Commons
    Software freedom — the core commitment of the free software movement — does represent at least the rudiments of a better system. Resisting and reversing enclosure will not come about through “sustainable growth” or the “sharing economy,” which preserve the logics and structures of the status quo. “Openness,” or the conviction that norms of transparency and publicity will clarify (and thereby equalize) power relations, is also no solution at all.
  • New web office suite, UNICEF's innovation fund, and more news
  • City of Riga to renew its ICT strategy
    The city of Riga (Latvia) will soon begin an overhaul of its approach to IT, focussing on making its data open by default, and giving companies and software developers access to some of the city’s eGovernment services through APIs. The city’s current IT architecture was designed about a decade ago, when “no one foresaw the growth of data”, says city council member Agris Ameriks.
  • Adding Position Control To An Open Source Brushless Motor Driver
    Brushless motors are everywhere now. From RC planes to CNC machines, if you need a lot of power to spin something really fast, you’re probably going to use a brushless motor. A brushless motor requires a motor controller, and for most of us, this means cheap Electronic Speed Controllers (ESC) from a warehouse in China. [Ben] had a better idea: build his own ESC. He’s been working on this project for a while, and he’s polishing the design to implement a very cool feature – position control.
  • Why $2 billion startup GitHub is apparently in crisis, again
    A struggle between factions is taking place, according to a report by The Information, which matches what several sources have told Business Insider.

Linux and FOSS Events (FOSDEM and Beyond)

  • FOSDEM video recordings
  • FOSDEM 2016 and ownCloud, Kolab, KDE and more
    After rocking SCALE, FOSDEM was next and a great event. Killing, too - two days with about 8000 people, it was insane. Lots of positive people again, loads of stuff we handed out so we ran out on Sunday morning - and cool devices at the ownCloud booth.
  • Look over the fence – StartUp Weekend Phnom Penh
    Linux and Free Software plays in South East Asia not that role as in Europe or North America. To change that at least a bit, I came here. The asian culture plays definitely a role and this was often discussed. But it plays lesser the vital role as we think and as the linked article shows, we will not find an easy an solution for the cultural differences. From my perspective it is lesser necessary that we adopt, the most asians I met are willing to accept the differences and can live with them.
  • foss-gbg goes foss-north
    As some of you might know, I run a group that meet and learn new stuff about foss month – foss-gbg. Today it’s official that this summer foss-gbg goes foss-north and it is going to be awesome. So I welcome you all to the wonderful city of Gothenburg to a day filled with talks on a wide variety of topics around free and open source technology. It is going to be awesome!

Mozilla Firefox News