Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Login

Enter your Tux Machines username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OpenStack and Servers

  • User Data Manifesto 2.0 launched
    In October 2012 I announced the first version of the User Data Manifesto during the Latinoware Keynote in Brazil. The idea was to define some basic right that all users should have in the digital age. This was still before the Snowden revelations. But it was already very clear that the privacy and security is at risk by cloud services and SaaS solutions that totally ignore the rights and interests of their users. So the idea was to try to define what this rights should be in the internet age.
  • OpenStack Continues to Push Cloud Integration Vision
    At the OpenStack Silicon Valley event, the head of the OpenStack Foundation announces new nonprofit status and developer initiatives. OpenStack continues to move forward, even as new technologies like containers enter the cloud virtualization landscape. At the OpenStack Silicon Valley event on Aug. 26, OpenStack supporters discussed why the open-source cloud platform is thriving and detailed new efforts to keep momentum moving forward.
  • Making strides in container integration, and more OpenStack news
  • Blue Box OpenStack Lands on IBM Softlayer Servers
    IBM is moving quickly to integrate technology from the recently acquired Blue Box cloud into its Softlayer cloud services. IBM announced the acquisition of Blue Box on June 3.
  • OpenStack makes some important friends
  • Intel reveals big data's dirty little secret
    Companies are spending billions on tools and engineering to analyse big data, though many are hampered by one little problem: they still don't know what to do with all the data they collect. "This is the dirty little secret about big data: No one actually knows what to do with it," Jason Waxman, an Intel vice president and general manager of the company's cloud platforms group, said Thursday in a webcast for investors. "They think they know what to do with it, and they know they have to collect it, because you have to have a big data strategy. But deriving the insights from big data is a little harder to do," he said.
  • Apache Advances Open Source Lens Big Data Platform
    The Apache Software Foundation (ASF) has advanced the open source Lens project for unified Big Data analytics, providing a single view of multiple tiered data sources.
  • Community App Catalog is a Big Priority for the OpenStack Foundation

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Monday
  • Luxembourg to list European IT security policies
    The government of Luxembourg aims to make an inventory of policies on IT security and data protection in the EU Member States. The study is one of the priorities of Luxembourg’s presidency of the EUPAN network, an informal network of European public administration representatives.
  • Indian mobile broadband clients can make Linux system vulnerable to attacks
  • Why is Windows lying about what root certificates it trusts?
    Starting with Windows Vista, a new AutoUpdate mechanism was added, allowing these trusted root certificates to be seamlessly downloaded on first use. Why does this matter? Because the incomplete information shown by Windows leads many people (including some security professionals) to believe that Windows trusts only a dozen or two root certificates out of the box, rather than hundreds.
  • Linux Foundation's security checklist can help sysadmins harden workstations
    If you're a Linux user, especially a systems administrator, the Linux Foundation has some security tips to share with you, and they're quite good. Konstantin Ryabitsev, the Foundation's director of collaborative IT services, published the security checklist that the organization uses to harden the laptops of its remote sysadmins against attacks. The recommendations aim to balance security decisions with usability and are accompanied by explanations of why they were considered. They also have different severity levels: critical, moderate, low and paranoid.
  • Linux Foundation releases PARANOID internal infosec guide
    Linux Foundation project director Konstantin Ryabitsev has publicly-released the penguinistas' internal hardening requirements to help sysadmins and other paranoid tech bods and system administrators secure their workstations. The baseline hardening recommendations are designed that balance security and convenience for its many remote admins, rather than a full-blown security document.
  • Linux workstation security checklist
    This is a set of recommendations used by the Linux Foundation for their systems administrators. All of LF employees are remote workers and we use this set of guidelines to ensure that a sysadmin's system passes core security requirements in order to reduce the risk of it becoming an attack vector against the rest of our infrastructure.
  • Seriousness of the OPM Data Breach Disputed
    On April 15, 2015, officials of the Office of Personnel Management realized they had been hacked and the records of 4.2 million of current and former employees had been stolen. Later investigations by OPM determined in early June that the number affected is 21.5 million, for whom sensitive information, including Social Security Numbers (SSNs), was stolen from the background investigation databases. This was the biggest breach of United States government data in history. Reports point to China as the source of the breach, but the Administration has not formally accused China.
  • Automakers fight car hacking bill - Computer Fraud and Abuse Act takes some blows
    You might think the effort to fortify cars’ cybersecurity could possibly make strange bedfellows out of automakers and safety advocates, what with all the recent reports basically amounting to the conclusion that a whole car can be hacked. But you’d be wrong.
  • Oracle, still clueless about security
    Oracle’s chief security officer, Mary Ann Davidson, recently ticked off almost everyone in the security business. She proclaimed that you had to do security “expertise in-house because security is a core element of software development and you cannot outsource it.” She continued, “Whom do you think is more trustworthy? Who has a greater incentive to do the job right — someone who builds something, or someone who builds FUD around what others build?”
  • Grsecurity Forced by Multi-Billion Dollar Company to Release Patches Only to Sponsors
    Grsecurity is a well-known set of patches for the Linux kernel, which greatly enhance the ability of the system to withstand various security threats. As you can imagine, there are many companies that want to use Grsecurity, and they need to follow the accompanying GPL license. They are not doing that, and now Grsecurity needs to take some drastic action.
  • BitTorrent patched against flaw that allowed crippling DoS attacks
  • GitHub wobbles under DDOS attack
    GitHub is under a distributed-denial-of-service attack being perpetrated by unknown actors. The service's status page reported “a brief capacity overload” early on Tuesday. The site's assessment of the incident was later upgraded to a a DDOS and at the time of writing the site is at code yellow.
  • CERT Warns of Hard-Coded Credentials in DSL SOHO Routers

32/64 bit versions of LXLE 14.04.3 released

Delays, delays. First with SeaMonkey then Lanshop. Still, moving forward with the release of LXLE 14.04.3 OS for both 32 & 64 bit machines. 12.04.5 32 bit has also been updated to reflect the same changes. Notable new features in this release includes, 'Xautolock' providing a top left hotcorner that invokes the 'WinPick" script which is an expose like utility and finally 'OpenSnap' added true aerosnap with just a simple drag & drop. Read more