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Android Leftovers

5 ways to conduct user research with an open source mindset

There are common beliefs about user experiences—the best ones are user-centered, iterative, and intuitive. When user experience (UX) research is conducted, user stories about these experiences are collected—but the research methods chosen inform user experiences, too. So, what makes for an engaging research experience, and how can methods evolve alongside products to better connect with users? Red Hat's User Experience Design (UXD) research team has the answer: a community-centered, open source mindset. As a UX writer on Red Hat's UXD team, I create new design documentation, empower team voices, and share Red Hat's open source story. My passion lies in using content to connect and inspire others. On our Twitter and Medium channels, we share thought leadership about UX writing, research, development, and design, all to amplify and grow our open source community. This community is at the heart of what we do. So when I learned how the research team centers community throughout their user testing, I leaped at the chance to tell their story. Read more

Linux Jargon Buster: What is FOSS (Free and Open Source Software)? What is Open Source?

FOSS means Free and Open Source Software. It doesn’t mean software is free of cost. It means that source code of the software is open for all and anyone is free to use, study and modify the code. This principle allows other people to contribute to the development and improvement of a software like a community. In the 60s and 70s, computers were hardware focused and the hardware were expensive. They were mainly used by academics in universities or researchers in labs. The limited amount of software used to come for free or with their source code and the users were allowed to modify the source code to suit their need. In the late 70s and early 80s, the manufacturer’s stopped distributing source code in an attempt to not let their software run on their competitor’s computers. Read more