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Screenshots/Audiocasts/Shows: Netrunner 20.01, Linux Headlines, This Week in Linux and Pandas

  • Netrunner 20.01 – Twenty Run Through

    In this video, we are looking at Netrunner 20.01 – Twenty.

  • 2020-02-25 | Linux Headlines

    Manjaro hits version 19, Firefox starts rolling out DNS over HTTPS by default in the US, Puppet releases version 2 of Bolt, and Mirantis commits to the future of Docker Swarm.

  • This Week in Linux 94: Mesa 20, PipeWire, Linux Be Scary, MyPaint, GTK, Microsoft Defender

    On this episode of This Week in Linux, we got some new releases from core projects like Mesa & PipeWire and we also got some App News from MyPaint, GTK and a new convergent apps project called Maui. Then we’ll check out some distro news regarding the Untangle Firewall and some Red Hat news about CoreOS Container Linux. Later in the show, we’ll cover some really interesting news from Nvidia about Ray Tracing to Vulkan. Someone in the UK Police thought it was a good idea to warn parents their kids may become hackers and Microsoft announced their Microsoft Defender is coming to Linux. Then we’ll round out the show with some great deals for Games, Books and Comics from Humble Bundle. All that and much more on Your Weekly Source for Linux GNews!

  • Data School: How to merge DataFrames in pandas (video)

    In my new pandas video, you're going to learn how to use the "merge" function so that you can combine multiple datasets into a single DataFrame. Merging (also known as "joining") can be tricky to do correctly, which is why I'll walk you through the process in great detail. By the end of the video, you'll be fully prepared to merge your own DataFrames!

Events: LibOCon, CHAOSScon, SUSE in Paris, Open Networking & Edge Summit North America 2020

  • LibreOffice Conference 2021 Call for Locations

    Once a year, the LibreOffice Community gathers for a global community event: the LibreOffice Conference, or LibOCon. After a series of successful events – Paris, October 2011; Berlin, October 2012; Milan, September 2013; Bern, September 2014; Aarhus, September 2015; Brno, September 2016; Rome, October 2017; Tirana, September 2018 and Almeria, September 2019 – the venue for 2020 is Nuremberg, Germany. To ease the organization, TDF Board of Directors has decided to open the call for location for 2021 earlier this year, to give the 2021 event organizers the opportunity of attending the conference in Nurembers in October 2020. The LibreOffice Conference takes place between September and November, with a preference for September. The deadline for sending in proposals is June 30, 2019. After receiving the applications, we will evaluate if all pre-conditions have been met and the overall content of the proposal, and give all applicants a chance to answer questions and clarify details if needed.

  • CHAOSScon EU 2020: play by play

    This is my second time attending CHAOSScon. I attended on behalf of RIT LibreCorps to represent our engagement with the UNICEF Office of Innovation and the Innovation Fund. For CHAOSScon EU 2020, I arrived hoping to learn more about effective metric collection strategies for open source communities and also get a deeper understanding of the technology behind GrimoireLab.

  • When in Paris, learn how SUSE empowers DevOps teams with HPE

    We will be there (Booth #21) to meet with Presales Consultants and Solution Architects from both HPE and Partners and chat about how we are working with HPE to deliver software-defined infrastructure with an open approach.

  • Keynote Speakers Announced For Open Networking & Edge Summit North America 2020

    The open networking event has now been expanded to cover Edge Computing, Edge Cloud and IoT. The event focuses on collaborative development and innovation across enterprises, service providers/telcos and cloud providers to shape the future of networking and edge computing with a deep focus on technical, architectural and business discussions in the areas of Open Networking & AI/ML-enabled use cases.

today's howtos

Programming: OpenXR, Fuchsia OS, Prolog and State of 'DevOps'

  • Open source XR runtime (VR/AR) 'Monado' sees a first release

    With the Khronos Group launching the OpenXR specification last year, their aim was to unify Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) development while Collabora worked on their open source implementation of Monado. Collabora have been hard at work on Monado, a currently Linux-focused open source XR runtime that will eventually also support other platforms. Today, they tagged the very first release. With this release they've worked in new drivers, there's now a set of scripts ready for people to try Monado rather than needing to setup a full development environment, udev rules sorted for USB permissions for XR hardware, distribution packaging and more. You can see the release announcement on the Collabora blog, where they note they also have some internships going. As for the code, it's all up on GitLab if you're interested in checking out in this early form. The future of XR on Linux sounds quite exciting, especially with efforts like this and Collabora do some great open source work.

  • Monado OpenXR runtime developer update

    We are very happy to tag version 0.1 of the Monado OpenXR runtime for Linux! Ever since announcing the project at GDC 2019, we have been working on improving the full open source XR stack to a usable state. Do keep in mind, this is a first tag, not a final release so it will contain some tinkering and is not feature complete! To echo the common phrase 'Be warned, here be dragons!'. Feel free to play around with Monado, and hit us up on our Discord to get help, report bugs or ask about contributing!

  • Google programming language scorecard: How C, C++, Dart, Rust, Go rate for Fuchsia

    Google has released a new programming language policy for Fuchsia, its under-development OS that some speculate could be its non-Linux successor to Android. Instead of a Linux kernel, the core of Google's Fuchsia OS is a Zircon microkernel to communicate with hardware and boot a system that runs Fuchsia. Google describes Fuchsia as specifically "not Linux" and a "modular, capability-based operating system".

  • Excellent Free Tutorials to Learn Prolog

    Prolog is a general purpose, declarative, logic programming language, often associated with artificial intelligence, computational linguistics, intelligent database retrieval, and problem solving. It’s widely used in research and education for natural language processing. Automatic backtracking is one of the most characteristic features of Prolog. It’s a form of searching, fundamental to all artificial intelligence techniques. Prolog also supports multi-directional reasoning; arguments to a procedure can freely be designated inputs and outputs in different ways in different procedure calls. This is a powerful theorem-proving technique. Another key feature of Prolog is that its syntax and semantics are closer to formal logic than say Lisp. Prolog is generally regarded as a difficult language to get to grips with. But learning the fundamentals of Prolog is definitely worthwhile.

  • State of DevOps Report Finds Maturity Varies Widely by Industry

    The scorecard gave the technology industry an "A" for DevOps adoption and an "A-" for security integration as part of the DevOps development pipeline. Brown noted that it was expected that companies in the technology industry would be leading the pack in terms of security integration because DevOps tends to be part of the DNA of those organizations.