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Security Leftovers

4.9 is a longterm kernel

Might as well just mark it as such now, to head off the constant questions. Yes, 4.9 is the next longterm supported kernel version. Read more Also: Yes, Linux 4.9 Is A Long-Term Kernel Release

openSUSE Package Management Cheat Sheet

Debian/Ubuntu have long been my primary Linux distributions, although like all good Linux users I have used Fedora, CentOS, Gentoo, Red Hat, Slackware, Arch Linux, Mageia, and other Linux distributions because why not? It is a feast of riches and the best playground there is. I became a SUSE employee recently, so naturally I've been spending more time with openSUSE. openSUSE is sponsored by SUSE, and it is an independent community project. There are two openSUSE flavors: Tumbleweed and Leap. Tumbleweed is a bleeding-edge rolling release, containing the latest software versions. Leap is more conservative, and it incorporates core code from SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES) 12. Both are plenty good for everyday use. Read more

Mozilla News

  • How to get started contributing to Mozilla
    Open source participation offers a sea of benefits that can fine-tune and speed up your career in the tech, including but not limited to real-world technical experience and expanding your professional network. There are a lot of open source projects out there you can contribute to—of small, medium, and large size, as well as unknown and popular. In this article we'll focus on how to contribute to one of the largest and most popular open source projects on the web: Mozilla.
  • Digital Citizens, Let’s Talk About Internet Health
    Today, Mozilla is launching the prototype version of the Internet Health Report. With this open-source research project, we want to start a conversation with you, citizens of the Internet, about what is healthy, unhealthy, and what lies ahead for the Internet. When I first fell in love with the Internet in the mid-1990s, it was very much a commons that belonged to everyone: a place where anyone online could publish or make anything. They could do so without asking permission from a publisher, a banker or a government. It was a revelation. And it made me — and countless millions of others — very happy. Since then, the Internet has only grown as a platform for our collective creativity, invention and self expression. There will be five billion of us on the Internet by 2020. And vast swaths of it will remain as open and decentralized as they were in the early days. At least, that’s my hope. Yet when Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg shows up on the cover of The Economist depicted as a Roman emperor, I wonder: is the Internet being divided up into a few great empires monopolizing everyday activities like search, talking to friends or shopping? Can it remain truly open and decentralized?
  • Mozilla ditches the dinosaur, unveils new branding only a nerd could love
    The old Netscape browser had a dinosaur named Mozilla as its mascot and codename. When the browser was open sourced in 1998, it used the dinosaur's name and visage as its branding.
  • Mozilla releases The Internet Health Report, an open-source document with version 1.0 coming by year end