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The Red Hat Way

  • Red Hat wants to make cold-shouldered OpenStack red hot
    At OpenStack Summit in Boston last May, some speculated that the event might be the last gasp for OpenStack — an open-source platform for cloud computing and infrastructure-as-service. Granted, OpenStack was one of the less hyped open-source projects of the past year. But renewed community and end-user interest is breathing fresh life into the platform, according to Rob Young (pictured), senior manager of virtualization product and strategy at Red Hat Inc. Telcos and others are adopting OpenStack “because of the simplification of what was once complex, but also in the cost savings that can be realized by managing your own cloud within a hybrid cloud environment,” Young said.
  • Improved multimedia support with Pipewire in Fedora 27
    Pipewire — a new project of underlying Linux infrastructure to handle multimedia better — has just been officially launched. The project’s main goal is to improve the handling of both audio and video. Additionally, Pipewire introduces a security model to allow easy interaction with multimedia devices from containerized and sandboxed applications, i.e. Flatpak apps.
  • Architecting the future with abstractions and metadata
    The modern data center is built on abstractions, with Docker, Kubernetes, and OpenShift leading the way.

Games: Racing Games, Steam, SteamWorld Dig 2, XCOM 2: War of the Chosen

Software: DNS Checkers, Alternatives to Adobe Software, Fake Hollywood Hacker Terminal and More

KDE and GNOME: Kubuntu Site, Marble Maps, Kube in Randa, and UX in GNOME

  • Call for design: Artful Banner for Kubuntu.org website
    Kubuntu 17.10 — code-named Artful Aardvark — will be released on October 19th, 2017. We need a new banner for the website, and invite artists and designers to submit designs to us based on the Plasma wallpaper and perhaps the mascot design.
  • Randa 2017 Report – Marble Maps
    Just came back home yesterday from Randa Meetings 2017. This year, even though my major motive for the sprint was to use Qt 5.8’s Qt Speech module instead of custom Java for text-to-speech during navigation, that could not be achieved because of a bug which made the routes not appear in the app in the first place. And this bug is reproducible both by using latest code, and old-enough code, and is even there in the prod app in the Google Play Store itself. So, although most of my time had gone in deep-diving on the issue, unfortunately I was not able to find the root-cause to it eventually. I will need to pick up on that in the coming weeks again when I get time, to get it fixed.
  • Kube in Randa
    I’ve spent the last few days with fellow KDE hackers in beautiful Randa in the Swiss Mountains. It’s an annual event that focuses on a specific topic every year, and this time accessibility was up, so Michael and me made our way up here to improve Kube in that direction (and to enjoy the scenic surroundings of course).
  • Usability testing for early-stage software prototypes
    In this article, Ciarrai Cunneen and I describe how to do a paper-based usability test, using an early redesign of the GNOME Settings app as an example. The updated Settings features in GNOME 3.26, released on September 13. When writing open source software, we often obsess about making our logic elegant and concise, coming up with clever ways to execute tasks and demonstrate ideas. But we sometimes forget a key fact: Software is not useful if it is not easy to use. To make sure our programs can be used by our intended audience, we need usability testing. Usability is basically asking the question, "Can people easily use this thing?" or "Can real people use the software to do real tasks in a reasonable amount of time?" Usability is crucial to the creative process of building anything user-based. If real people can't use our software, then all the hard work of creating it is pointless. [...] In early 2016, GNOME decided to make a major UI update to its Settings application. This visual refresh shifts from an icon-based menu to drop-down lists and adds important changes to several individual Settings panels. The GNOME design team wanted to test these early-stage design changes to see how easily real people could navigate the new GNOME Settings application. Previously, GNOME relied on traditional usability tests, where users explore the software's UI directly. But this wouldn't work, since the software updates hadn't been completed.