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Linux Kernel and the Linux Foundation: x86-64 micro-architecture, NVMe ZNS and Community Specification

  • Linux Might Pursue x86_64 Micro-Architecture Feature Levels

    Stemming from the recent GNU glibc work on better handling modern CPU optimizations with newer instruction set extensions across Intel and AMD product families, the concept of x86-64 micro-architecture feature levels is being talked about by open-source/Linux developers. The idea of these feature levels is breaking up the supported instructions beyond base x86_64 into that of what is supported at reasonable times by both Intel and AMD processors. While newer Intel/AMD CPUs generally support more instruction set extensions, there are other headaches involved in the current handling of x86_64 CPU capabilities considering the likes of modern Intel Atom CPUs only supporting a sub-set of the extensions supported by Core and Xeon CPUs, thus coming up with these reasonably sane feature levels is being talked about by Red Hat developers with input from Intel and AMD engineers.

  • NVMe ZNS Support Coming To Linux 5.9

    NVMe ZNS is for the Zoned Namespaces support that is part of the NVMe 2.0 specification debuting in H2'2020. ZNS is similar to existing SMR (Shingled Magnetic Recording) and ZBC (Zoned Block Commands) with allowing applications/software to control the placement of data on the NVMe SSD within zones rather than relying upon the SSD device exclusively for data placement. NVMe ZNS aims to improve solid-state drive lifetime with reducing write amplification, reducing latency, improving throughput, and potential TCO benefits.

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  • Linux Foundation launches Community Specification for creating standards and specifications [Ed: This misses the point that the Linux Foundation outsourced this to Microsoft (Github) proprietary software and monopoly]

    According to the Linux Foundation, Open Standards are “specifications made available to the public, developed, and maintained via an inclusive, collaborative, transparent, and consensus-driven process.” These standards allow for interoperability and data exchange among different products or services.  The Linux Foundation believes it’s important to have a standards project because items like due process, balance, inclusiveness, and intellectual property clarity are important for developing open-source projects, and a standards project ensures there aren’t any surprises regarding intellectual property down the line.  “The Community Specification builds on these best practices and brings them to the Git repository development environments that developers are already using. And it makes it easy to get started. You can start using the Community Specification by bringing its terms into your repository and getting to work — just like starting an open source project,” the Linux Foundation wrote.

Python Programming

  • The Real Python Podcast – Episode #17: Linear Programming, PySimpleGUI, and More

    Are you familiar with linear programming, and how it can be used to solve resource optimization problems? Would you like to free your Python code from a clunky command line and start making convenient graphical interfaces for your users? This week on the show, David Amos is back with another batch of PyCoder's Weekly articles and projects.

  • Managing Python Environments with direnv and pyenv
  • wxPython by Example – Creating a wx.Notebook (Video)

    In this tutorial, you will learn how to add a wx.Notebook to your GUI application using wxPython. The notebook widget is how you would add a tabbed interface to your application.

  • 12+ Free (or Low-Cost) Websites to Empower Your Programming Education

    Although we still talk about programming as a standalone career, the dominance of technology in our lives makes it clear that coding is much more than a career path. In my opinion, computer science is more than a college major or a high-paid job - it’s a skill, essential for thriving in a modern-day economy. Regardless of what you want to do for a living - work in healthcare, marketing, business, or other fields - you will see more coding and have to deal with the growing number of technologies throughout your entire life. Now that we live in a tech-driven world, asking “Should I learn to program” is almost synonymous with “Should I learn to speak, read, or count?”. The short answer is: yes. How to start your journey in coding? The good news is, there are plenty of resources to support you all the way through. To save you the trouble of looking them up and choosing the right ones, I created my list of learning platforms that offer well-rounded programming education and help you stay competitive on the job market. Here are 12+ useful educational resources every coding student should check out.

  • A Hundred Days of Code, Day 003 - Methods

    My understanding about methods? They are functions in classes that help me manipulate the data the objects contain when they are created. I have been using something them subconsciously all along. The __init__ method, that is called/run automatically every time an object is created.

  • Another try at a new Python module for OpenPGP aka johnnycanencrypt

    Using OpenPGP from Python is a pain. There are various documentation/notes on the Internet explaining why, including the famous one from isis agora lovecraft where they explained why they changed the module name to pretty_bad_protocol. sequoia-pgp is a Rust project to do OpenPGP from scratch in Rust, and as library first approach. You can see the status page to see how much work is already done. Using this and Pyo3 project I started writing an experimental Python module for OpenPGP called Johnny Can Encrypt.

  • PSF GSoC students blogs: Weekly Check-in #4

today's howtos

Slackel 7.3 Openbox

Slackel 7.3 Openbox has been released. Slackel is based on Slackware and Salix. Includes the Linux kernel 5.4.50 and latest updates from Slackware's 'Current' tree. The new version is available in 64-bit and 32-bit builds. The 64-bit iso image support booting on UEFI systems. Iso images are isohybrid. Iso images can be used as installation media. Read more