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KeePassXC 2.6.2 Password Manager Adds Major UI Improvements and Bug Fixes

One of the major improvements included in the KeePassXC 2.6.2 release is a new way for the web browser integration to handle and prioritizes URLs. In addition, there’s also a new “Always on Top” mode in the view menu that lets users set the main KeePassXC window to always be on top. Furthermore, KeePassXC 2.6.2 moves the option to show or hide usernames and passwords to the view menu, adds new command-line options to let users specify the location of the configuration file and to set environment variables, and improves the CSV import and export functionality, along with support for ISO datetimes. Read more

IBM/Red Hat: LinuxONE, OpenShift, Integrity Measurement Architecture (IMA) and More

  • IBM integrates Linux One with R3 Corda Enterprise

    It’s an exciting time for IBM LinuxONE. Over the past several months, we’ve been doubling down on new hardware, Red Hat OpenShift and new Cloud Paks for LinuxONE, and new confidential computing capabilities. More than ever, our clients of all sizes looking to win in the era of hybrid cloud are focused on key areas: resiliency, performance demands, security, flexibility and modernization. Other areas of growth for LinuxONE are emerging workloads and industries like blockchain and digital asset custody. While the importance of safeguarding business and customer data is well known, the nature of blockchain use cases often include the initiation, transfer and custody of financial assets for your business and your customers—which further increases the importance of building applications with security and privacy first. News from R3’s CordaCon

  • Persistent storage in action: Understanding Red Hat OpenShift's persistent volume framework - Red Hat Developer

    Red Hat OpenShift is an enterprise-ready Kubernetes platform that provides a number of different models you can use to deploy an application. OpenShift 4.x uses Operators to deploy Kubernetes-native applications. It also supports Helm and traditional template-based deployments. Whatever deployment method you choose, it will be deployed as a wrapper to one or more existing OpenShift resources. Examples include BuildConfig, DeploymentConfig, and ImageStream. In this article, I introduce you to OpenShift’s Kubernetes-based persistent volume framework for persistent cluster storage. You will learn how to use OpenShift’s PersistentVolume (PV) and PersistentVolumeClaim (PVC) objects to provision and request storage resources.

  • How to use the Linux kernel's Integrity Measurement Architecture

    The kernel integrity sub-system can be used to detect if a file has been altered (accidently or maliciously), both remotely and/or locally. It does that by appraising a file's measurement (its hash value) against a "good" value stored previously as an extended attribute (on file systems which support extended attributes like ext3, ext4. etc.). Similar, but complementary, mechanisms are provided by other security technologies like SELinux which depending on policy can attempt to protect file integrity. The Linux IMA (Integrity Measurement Architecture) subsystem introduces hooks within the Linux kernel to support creating and collecting hashes of files when opened, before their contents are accessed for read or execute. The IMA measurement subsystem was added in linux-2.6.30 and is supported by Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8. The kernel integrity subsystem consists of two major components. The Integrity Measurement Architecture (IMA) is responsible for collecting file hashes, placing them in kernel memory (where userland applications cannot access/modify it) and allows local and remote parties to verify the measured values. The Extended Verification Module (EVM) detects offline tampering (this could help mitigate evil-maid attacks) of the security extended attributes. IMA maintains a runtime measurement list and, if anchored in a hardware Trusted Platform Module(TPM), an aggregate integrity value over this list. The benefit of anchoring the aggregate integrity value in the TPM is that the measurement list is difficult to compromise by a software attack, without it being detectable. Hence, on a trusted boot system, IMA-measurement can be used to attest to the system's runtime integrity.

  • Bajaj Allianz Life Insurance, IndusInd Bank, ManipalCigna Health Insurance Company, and _VOIS Named Winners of the Red Hat APAC Innovation Awards 2020 for India

    Red Hat, Inc., the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced the winners of the Red Hat APAC Innovation Awards 2020 for India. Bajaj Allianz Life Insurance Company, IndusInd Bank, ManipalCigna Health Insurance Company Limited and _VOIS were honored at the Red Hat Forum Asia Pacific 2020 today for their exceptional and innovative use of Red Hat solutions.

Identify Songs On Your Linux Desktop Using SongRec, A Shazam Client For Linux

SongRec is an open source Shazam client for Linux. It's written in Rust, with the GUI using Gtk3. Using the Shazam audio fingerprinting algorithm, this application can identify a song from an audio file or using the microphone. MP3, FLAC, WAV and OGG formats are supported. This works by analyzing the captured sound, be it from the microphone or and audio file, and seeking a match based on an acoustic fingerprint in a database of millions of songs. Most of the processing is done server-side (so SongRec connects to the Shazam servers). When finding a match in the Shazam database, SongRec shows the artist, song and album names, as well as the date when the recognition was done. All recognized songs are kept in a history list that you can export to CSV or wipe. Shazam is a music recognition application own by Apple, available for Android, iOS, watchOS and macOS. It can identify music based on a short sample, provided that the background noise level is not high enough to prevent an acoustic fingerprint being taken, and that the song is present in the software's database. Read more

Ubuntu 20.10 Released

  • Ubuntu 20.10 released, brings full Linux dekstop to Raspberry Pi

    Open-source software fans will now be able to work across even more devices after Canonical revealed the launch of Ubuntu 20.10. The latest version of the world's most popular open-source software features a raft of upgrades and improvements, making it more accessible and easier to use than ever before. For the first time, users will be able to enjoy Ubuntu on Raspberry Pi devices, with the new release offering optimised Raspberry Pi images for desktop and server.

  • Ubuntu 20.10 Desktop Now Supports the Raspberry Pi 4

    As of the latest release, Raspberry Pi models with 4GB or 8GB RAM can run the Ubuntu 20.10 desktop. Yup, the Groovy Gorilla dishes up support for full-fledged, full-fat desktop version. Groovy is but the first foot forward towards a larger goal: an Ubuntu LTS release on the Raspberry Pi, as Eben Upton, CEO at Raspberry Pi, says: “From the classic Raspberry Pi board to the industrial grade Compute Module, this first step to an Ubuntu LTS on Raspberry Pi with long term support and security updates matches our commitment to widen access to the very best computing and open source capabilities.”

  • Ubuntu 20.10 rolls out today, along with official support for the Raspberry Pi 4

    While users who want a properly stable base to game with should probably stick to Ubuntu 20.04 which is the long-term support release, the Ubuntu 20.10 'Groovy Gorilla' update is out today. For a while there has been a few special Ubuntu flavours that have offered images to install on the Raspberry Pi like Ubuntu MATE, however, that's now becoming official directly within Ubuntu as of the 20.10 release. This is actually awesome, as Ubuntu is one of the easiest Linux distributions to get going with. From the press release: “In this release, we celebrate the Raspberry Pi Foundation’s commitment to put open computing in the hands of people all over the world,” said Mark Shuttleworth, CEO at Canonical. “We are honoured to support that initiative by optimising Ubuntu on the Raspberry Pi, whether for personal use, educational purposes or as a foundation for their next business venture.” “From the classic Raspberry Pi board to the industrial grade Compute Module, this first step to an Ubuntu LTS on Raspberry Pi with long term support and security updates matches our commitment to widen access to the very best computing and open source capabilities” said Eben Upton, CEO of Raspberry Pi Trading.