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A Miniature VT102 Running A Miniature PDP11

We spend a lot of time looking at retrocomputing in the form of gaming and home computers, but it’s true to say that minicomputers are less common than hardware projects. Perhaps it’s the size, cost, or even relative rarity of the original machines, but DEC minicomputers are a bit unusual around here. [Sprite_TM] hasn’t bought us a PDP11 or a VT102 terminal, but he’s done the next best thing in the form of a miniature working VT102 that also conceals a PDE11 emulator. It runs Tetris, which was originally developed on a Russian clone of the PDP11 architecture, and the 2.1BSD operating system. Powering it all is an ESP32 module, and the PDP11 emulator is the well-known SIMH software. Porting this to the slightly limited environment of the microcontroller required a few compromises, namely the network stack and the configuration interface. In a particularly clever move [Sprite_TM] enabled BSD networking by writing an ESP32 layer that takes network packets via SIMD directly from BSD. It includes its own DHCP client and wireless network configuration tool, allowing an ancient UNIX-derived operating system from the 1970s to connect to the 21st century Internet through an emulator with its network code stripped out. Read more

Upgrading Ubuntu

I tend to run Ubuntu on my computers as the primary operating system. Given I work for Canonical, this isn’t especially surprising. However I have run Ubuntu on pretty much everything since 2005 or so - long before I started working at Canonical (in 2011). Mostly I will upgrade as each new release comes out, only doing a clean install once in a while. I ran GNOME 2 for all the years from 2004 through to Unity being released, then switched to that. After Ubuntu switched from Unity to GNOME Shell I went along with that in late 2017, and have mostly been running it ever since. I sometimes run other distros in VMs, or play with live environments, but I tend to stick to Ubuntu. Not for any company imposed reason - there’s a bunch of people at Canonical who run Arch, MacOS or something else. I just prefer Ubuntu. Read more

Create Bootable USB Using Etcher in Linux

Etcher is a free and open-source utility developed by Balena licensed under Apache License 2.0. It is used to create a bootable USB device using ISO and IMG files. There are many tools available to create a bootable USB stick in Linux. Etcher is one of them, and we recommend using it as it is way faster to create a bootable USB stick than other utilities. Today, we guide you on how to install Etcher and make your first bootable USB stick. Read more

today's howtos

  • Install Inkscape 1.0.2 In Ubuntu / LinuxMint / Debian | Tips On UNIX

    Inkscape is a free and open-source professional vector graphics editor software that runs on Linux, Mac OS X, and Windows desktop computers. It is suitable for illustrators and web designers and it is an alternative to Adobe Illustrator. It supports many SVG features (markers, alpha blending, clones, etc..) and easy to use.

  • How to enable PowerTools on CentOS 8

    The PowerTools repository, which is available on CentOS/RHEL 8, provides developer related tools and libraries. Some EPEL packages depend on packages available from PowerTools. Thus if you have set up the EPEL repository on your CentOS, it is recommended that you enable PowerTools as well.

  • Install gscan2pdf 2.11.0 in Ubuntu / Linux Mmint

    gscan2pdf a GUI tool used to produce PDF’s or DjVus from Scanned documents,gscan2pdf works on all Linux / BSD machines gscan2pdf team released a newer version 2.11.0 recently and yet to be updated in official Jeffrey Ratcliffe PPA for Ubuntu 20.04 and lower versions. This tutorial will be helpful for beginners to install gscan2pdf 2.11.0 in Ubuntu 20.10, Ubuntu 20.04, Linux Mint 20.1, and lower versions of Ubuntu and Linux Mint.

  • How to set up WireGuard VPN server on Ubuntu 20.04

    Traditionally, VPN implementation has existed in two forms. In-kernel VPN implementation such as IPsec performs heavy-duty per-packet crypto processing in the kernel in a "bump-in-the-stack" fashion (i.e., between IP stack and the network drivers). This gives speed as there is no context switch between kernel and userspace during packet processing. But it comes with high management complexity in separate userspace control plane (e.g., IKE). An alternative form of VPN implementation is userspace TUN/TAP-based solutions such as OpenVPN, Tinc, n2n, where crypto processing is performed by a userspace VPN daemon. Naturally, these TUN/TAP-based VPN solutions have poor performance compared to IPsec mainly because network packets traverse the kernel and userspace boundary multiple times, resulting in frequent context switches and packet copies. Despite their performance disadvantage, userspace VPN solutions enjoy more popularty than the in-kernel counterpart due to their ease of use and configuration.

  • How to create a lifecycle policy for an S3 Bucket on AWS

    We can use the Lifecycle Policy to manage the objects in S3 Bucket so that they are stored cost-effectively throughout. An S3 Lifecycle Policy is a set of rules used to define actions that Amazon S3 applies to objects in the bucket.

  • How to change the hostname on Ubuntu 20.04 LTS

    In a Local Area Network (LAN) environment, computer systems need to communicate with each other based on their IP addresses. To learn and remember these IP addresses and sharing them when needed is a tricky business. In order to avoid such trouble, users tend to rename their system’s hostname for their own ease. The simpler hostnames will allow all computer users to coordinate easily without an exchange of large IP addresses. This whole scenario is quite related to the URLs and DNS server address, where the user is totally unaware of long addresses and simply use the URLs in their search engine. In this tutorial, I will show you two methods to change the hostname of an Ubuntu 20.04 system via the command line terminal and GUI. Users can opt either way to update the names and share them once they have finalized them.

  • How To Delete Outdated Vagrant Boxes In Linux - OSTechNix

    You might have downloaded several versions of Vagrant boxes and some of them might be pretty outdated! If they are no longer required, you can safely delete outdated Vagrant boxes in Linux as described in this brief guide. Check for outdated Vagrant boxes I have been using Vagrant for the past few months for testing purposes. Since Vagrant version 1.5, boxes support versioning. The Box Versioning allows the developers who make boxes to push updates or fixes and the users to easily update the underlying box.

  • LHB Digest #21.02: Uptime Monitoring, Terminal Shortcuts, Linux Commands Tips and More
  • How To Install Java on Linux Mint 20 - idroot

    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Java on Linux Mint 20. For those of you who didn’t know, Java is a very popular language when it comes to programming. It is a common language for android development and other enterprise solutions. It was first released by Sun Microsystems in 1995. Many programs and scripts require Java to run it, but usually, Java is not installed by default on a VPS or Dedicated Server.

  • building a simple KVM switch for 30€ | die-welt.net

    Prompted by tweets from Lesley and Dave, I thought about KVM switches again and came up with a rather cheap solution to my individual situation (YMMY, as usual). As I've written last year, my desk has one monitor, keyboard and mouse and two computers. Since writing that post I got a new (bigger) monitor, but also an USB switch again (a DIGITUS USB 3.0 Sharing Switch) - this time one that doesn't freak out my dock \o/ However, having to switch the used computer in two places (USB and monitor) is rather inconvenient, but also getting an KVM switch that can do 4K@60Hz was out of question. Luckily, hackers gonna hack, everything, and not only receipt printers. There is a tool called ddcutil that can talk to your monitor and change various settings. And udev can execute commands when (USB) devices connect… You see where this is going?

  • An introduction to hashing and checksums in Linux | Enable Sysadmin

    Always wondered how to make use of a checksum? This introduction shows you what they mean, and how to use the proper tools to verify the integrity of a file.

  • How to remove background microphone noise in Windows, Mac, Linux

    Noisetorch is an open-source Linux application that allows you to create a virtual microphone that suppresses background noise. To filter out background noise in an application, simply select the virtual microphone instead of your regular microphone, and the application will filter out background noise.

  • Craig Small: Percent CPU for processes

    The ps program gives a snapshot of the processes running on your Unix-like system. On most Linux installations, this will be the ps program from the procps project. While you can get a lot of information from the tool, a lot of the fields need further explanation or can give “wrong” or confusing information; or putting it another way, they provide the right information that looks wrong. One of these confusing fields is the %CPU or pcpu field. You can see this as the third field with the ps aux command. You only really need the u option to see it, but ps aux is a pretty common invokation.