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Programming Leftovers

  • RasPi: New keyboards for Portugal, Norway, Sweden, and Denmark
  • Heap Data Structure Tutorial

    Data is a set of values. Data can be collected and put in a row, or in a column, or in a table or in the form of a tree. The structure of data is not only the placement of data in any of these forms. In computing, the data structure is any of these formats, plus the relationship among the values, plus the operations (functions) perform on the values. You should already have basic knowledge on tree data structure before coming here, as the concepts there, will be used here with little or no explanation.

  • Perl Weekly Challenge 67: Number Combinations and Letter Phone

    Perl does not have a built-in combinations function, but there are several modules (for example Math::Combinatorics) providing the functionality. However, this being a coding challenge, I don’t want to use a third-party ready-made solution and prefer to show a way to do it yourself. If we knew in advance how many items we want in each combination, nested loops might be the best solution. But if we want to be flexible about the number of items in each combination, then it is often simpler to use a recursive approach. Here, the combinations subroutine is recursive and is called once for every item wanted in the combination.

  • Lucky Number Per7

    I swear it was Perl 5 just a moment ago. I turned my back for all of 5 minutes ... I don't need the new features, but I don't like boilerplate and I'm happy to accommodate those who seek progress. Harking back to lessons from the past, SysAdmins of a certain age may remember the venerable a2p program for converting awk scripts to perl and the horrendous (but working) code that it produced. We had one of those running in production less than 2 years ago until I finally decided to re-write it in Modern Perl. A bit like moving house, as a community we need to face the pain every so often and address the risks and ptifalls, not as reasons to keep to the status quo, but as a checklist of problems to be solved.

  • Episode #271: Unlock the mysteries of time, Python's datetime that is!

    Time is a simple thing, right? And working with it in Python is great. You just import datetime and then (somewhat oddly) use the datetime class from that module. Oh except, there are times with timezones, and times without. And why is there a total_seconds() but not total_minutes(), hours() or days() on timedelta? How about computing the number of weeks? What if you wanted to iterate over the next 22 workdays, skipping weekends? Ok, we'd better talk about time in Python! Good thing Paul Ganssle is here. He's a core developer who controls time in CPython.

  • GSoC’20 First Evaluation

    In the last blog, I wrote about my first two weeks on the GSoC period. In this blog, I would write about the activities to which I have worked further and implemented multiple datasets. [...] Why multiple datasets to GCompris activities? As previously all of the activities were having a generalized dataset so for some of the age groups as for 3-5 yrs the activity seems quite difficult to play, and also for some of the age groups the activity seems to be quite easy. So, multiple datasets help in resolving this issue and we have multiple data for various age groups and all the activities can be more adaptive for the children.

today's howtos

Android Leftovers

Dillo: Does This Ultra-Lightweight Browser Still Work in 2020?

Before jumping in, you should know exactly what Dillo doesn’t include, just to temper your expectations. Dillo does not include Flash, Java, or Javascript and only has limited support for frames. It also doesn’t allow you to create a user profile. Presumably, that will be most of the modern Internet out of the picture, but who knows? We’ll see. The advantage of all that feature-cutting is that it will run on almost anything – even a 486 with dial-up Internet. Running at idle, Dillo was using 2.9 MB of RAM and 9.5 MB of shared memory, which is microscopic compared to the gigs of RAM used by modern browsers. If you’re willing to trawl the Internet, people have run it on Mac, DOS, and a bunch of Unix variants, but now the website just has source tarballs, mostly focusing on Linux. It can also run on Windows, but the Dillo team actively dislikes the platform! Read more