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More in Tux Machines

Zorin OS For Windows Users

Dear former Microsoft users, after Windows 7 (W7) officially discontinued early this year, how about looking at alternative operating system called Zorin OS? Zorin is computer operating system for everybody that is user-friendly and familiar. You can get Zorin gratis and free, you and your family can use without learning much, prepare to live peacefully without virus & antivirus, and you will be happy you can revive old computers with it. This article gives you sights on Zorin from perspective of a W7 user and see if you find it interesting. Enjoy Zorin! Read more

11 Linux commands I can’t live without

Linux is an important part of our lives, especially as a system administrator. This article shares the Linux commands that I can’t live without. So, let’s begin... So there you have it. Eleven Linux commands that most sysadmins can’t live without! Read more

100,000 Tweets

@tuxmachines in Twitter
The @tuxmachines account in Twitter as of this morning

We have been on Twitter for nearly a decade. It's proprietary and centralised, but some of our audience comes from there. In the start of March we'll have posted our 100,000th tweet in Twitter. A milestone? Maybe for Twitter. We try to focus on our presence in Free/libre networks, such as Mastodon, Pleroma and Diaspora. We joined Pleroma a year ago and have more followers there than we have in Twitter. Spring is fast approaching, which means we soon turn 16.

Programming: C, Perl and Python

  • C Programming Examples on Linux for Beginners

    C programming language is one of the good choices for learning computer programming for the beginners. The basic programming logic can be learned easily by using C language as a first language. Java is considered as first programming language by some people, but I think, it is better to learn structured or procedural programming using C language before learning any object-oriented programming. The basic C programming on Linux is shown in this article by using different examples for the beginners.

  • Monitorix 3.12.0 released

    Another great Perl software that I find very useful is Monitorix. Monitorix is FOSS lightweight system monitoring designed to monitor as many services and system resources as possible. The tl;dr is that it works really well for monitoring stand alone machines- which is what I used it for. It's tracks all sorts of metrics with minimal configuration by me, and with packages for most distros its trivial to install and update.

  • Book review - Machine Learning with Python for Everyone, By Mark E. Fenner

    Machine learning, one of the hottest tech topics of today, is being used more and more. Sometimes as the best tool for the job, other times perhaps as a buzzword that is mainly used as a way to make a product look cooler. However, without knowing what ML is and how it works behind the scenes, it’s very easy to get lost. But this book does a great job in guiding you all the way up from very simple math concepts to some sophisticated machine learning techniques.

  • Python 3.8.2 and 3.9.0a4 are now available

    On behalf of the entire Python development community, and the currently serving Python release team in particular, I’m pleased to announce the release of two of the latest Python editions. Python 3.8.2 Python 3.8.2 is the second maintenance release of Python 3.8 and contains two months worth of bug fixes. Detailed information about all changes made in 3.8.2 can be found in its change log. Note that compared to 3.8.1, version 3.8.2 also contains the changes introduced in 3.8.2rc1 and 3.8.2rc2.

  • Build Systems with Speed and Confidence by Closing the Loop First!

    A completely finished “loop” is when you can provide the required input to your system, and it produces the desired output (or side effects, if that’s how you like it). The “Close the loop first” technique is about closing this loop as fast as possible by creating a barebones version of it first, providing all or some required inputs, and generating a partial form of the desired output. Once we have closed this barebones loop, we can then begin implementing behaviours from the inside out, so that with each new change our loop starts looking more like the actual system we want. Sure, this is nothing new, right? We have all heard of this advice in various forms: build a proof of concept as quickly as possible; validate the unknowns first; if you want to deliver a car, deploy a skateboard first, etc. This is similar, but I am talking today purely from a “programming” point of view. In addition to helping you fail fast, “closing the loop” first also lets you build systems with more speed.