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Security scandal around WhatsApp shows the need for decentralised messengers and digital sovereignty

The recent security scandal around WhatsApp and access to the content of private groups shows that there is an urgent need for action with regard to secure communication. Links to private chat groups in the proprietary WhatsApp messenger can be used to show the communication and private data of group members, even if you are not a member. The links could be found on various search engines. Even if they are removed from search results, links still work and give access to private group communication. Among these groups are also administrations like civil servants of the Indonesian Ministry of Finance. This case shows again that digital sovereignty is crucial for states and administrations. The security breach was first reported by Deutsche Welle. In order to establish trustworthy and secure communication, governments need to strengthen interoperable Free Software solutions using Open Standards and enable decentralisation. This helps administrations as well as individuals to protect their privacy and empowers them to have control of the technology they use. The software is already in place and was used by most of the internet users before Google and Facebook joined the market: XMPP! This open protocol, also known as Jabber, has been developed by the Free Software community since 1999. Thanks to Open Standards it is possible to communicate with people who use a completely different client software and XMPP server. You are even able to communicate with other services like ICQ or AIM - some might remember. XMPP has also been used by tech enterprises like Facebook and Google for their chat systems, but both eventually switched to isolated proprietary solutions, so XMPP has been forgotten by many users. Read more

Android Leftovers

Nvidia 440.64 Driver Released with Initial Support for Linux Kernel 5.6

Nvidia 440.64 comes about a month after the previous release, Nvidia 440.59, which added PRIME synchronization support for Linux kernel 5.4 LTS and later, as well as support for audio over DisplayPort Multi-Stream, and support for Nvidia High Definition Audio (HDA) controllers. This new version released today is only a small update that only introduces support for the Nvidia GeForce MX330 and Nvidia GeForce MX350 GPUs, as well as initial support for the upcoming Linux 5.6 kernel series by fixing some compilation bugs that prevented the Nvidia kernel module from building correctly. Read more Also: NVIDIA 440.64 Driver Released With MX330/MX350 Support, Linux 5.6 Compatibility

HP Linux Imaging and Printing Driver Now Supports Linux Mint 19.3

HPLIP 3.20.2 is out with support for new HP laser printers, including HP Neverstop Laser MFP 1200n, HP Neverstop Laser MFP 1201n, HP Neverstop Laser MFP 1200nw, HP Neverstop Laser MFP 1202nw, HP Neverstop Laser 1000n, HP Neverstop Laser 1001nw, HP Laser NS MFP 1005n, and HP Laser NS 1020n. Additionally, the new version supports several HP ScanJet scanners, including the HP ScanJet Pro 2000 s2, HP ScanJet Pro 3000 s4, HP ScanJet Pro N4000 snw1, HP ScanJet Enterprise Flow 5000 s5, and HP ScanJet Enterprise Flow N7000 snw1. But, what’s probably more important for Linux users is that the HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.20.2 driver adds support for the Linux Mint 19.3 “Tricia” distribution. So if you’re running Linux Mint 19.3 and have a HP printer or scanner, you’ll have to install HPLIP 3.20.2 to make it work. Read more