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Linus Torvalds Questions The Not So Glorious Driver For That Funky Looking RGB Mouse

Last month I noted a new Linux driver for a buggy and funky looking mouse. A special driver was created by a community developer due to not all the mice button working otherwise due to not abiding by HID specifications. Now that the driver was merged for Linux 5.7, Linus Torvalds had words to share on this open-source driver. The hid-glorious driver is a basic HID Linux driver needed for PC Gaming Race's Glorious mice of at least some different models. Their HID behavior is not following spec resulting in some mouse buttons not working. This isn't some knock-off super cheap mouse either but the Glorious Model O for instance retails for $50 USD. Read more

Embedded Linux joins the Covid-19 battle

Embedded Linux is combating the coronavirus in thermal imaging devices such as the Kogniz’ Health Cam and a Raspberry Pi based FluSense device that analyzes coughs. We also look at open source ventilator projects and products from Aaeon, Advantech, and Seeed. AI surveillance devices that use facial recognition and other technologies to identify and track people give us the creeps and make us wonder about the future of civil liberties. But you know what else gives us the creeps? The novel coronavirus. In recent weeks we’ve heard about a variety of embedded Linux devices that are being put to work scanning people for thermal signatures that might suggest a high fever. Below, we examine some thermal imaging technologies for detecting Covid-19 that are confirmed to run Linux, including Kogniz’ Jetson Xavier based Health Cam and a Raspberry Pi based FluSense device that incorporates a Myriad X accelerator and a ReSpeaker mic array for detecting coughs. But first we’ll take a brief tour of some other Covid-19 related projects and products that involve Linux, open source, or embedded tech in general. Read more

Games: Atari VCS, Proton and More

  • The Atari VCS is in trouble again as Rob Wyatt sues Atari for lack of payment

    Rob Wyatt, the architect behind the original Xbox and someone Atari hired to work on the Atari VCS system is now suing Atari over their failure to actually pay up. This is something we mentioned last year, when it was announced that Wyatt left Atari on poor terms, mentiong how they hadn't actually payed for over six months and they were left with no choice but to leave the project. Since then, we've not heard much. Atari continued putting out their development blog posts, showing off pictures of units in production in China and delaying the release. Spotted by VentureBeat and confirmed here, Tin Giant (Rob Wyatt's company), are now suing Atari over a "Breach of Contract". According to the suit, Atari owes something around $261,720 which is no small sum.

  • Hypnotic puzzle-adventure 'Path to Mnemosyne' looks wild and it's now on Linux

    Path to Mnemosyne from DevilishGames originally released back in 2018, going on to receive some quite positive reviews about the setting and visuals and now it's on Linux. It does look incredibly trippy, and they say the "infinite zoom" feature makes it quite unique.

  • Humble Choice has a new bundle up for April with a bonus game if you subscribe

    Humble Choice, the monthly game bundle subscription has a fresh selection ready for April and they're giving out a bonus game to people who subscribe. This is the tiered subscription that gives you the ability to pick a certain amount of games based on whatever level you sub at.

  • FROGSONG is a sweet looking frog adventure where it's okay to be small

    Ready for an adventure of a different sort? FROGSONG looks really quite sweet, an action adventure where you're an actual frog hopping around in a world 'where it's okay to be small'.

  • Valve and CodeWeavers now offering test builds of Proton before release with Proton 5.0-6 RC1 up

    Looks like Valve and CodeWeavers are switching up how Proton is released, with a series of test builds now being provided before a new stable release in the hopes of seeing less issues. Looking to get started with Steam Play on Linux? Have no idea what it is? Be sure to check our previous beginners guide for some tips and explanations. We'll be keeping that up to date with any major changes. Today, Wine hacker and CodeWeavers developer Andrew Eikum announced the release of Proton 5.0-6 RC1 on the Proton GitHub page. Keep in mind these new builds haven't had the usual quality assurance as the main Proton releases, however it's a good chance for more people to test before they go live for everyone on Steam.

  • Proton 5.0-6 To Allow Out-Of-The-Box DOOM Eternal On Linux

    Valve is finishing up work on Proton 5.0-6 as the next version of their Wine downstream that powers Steam Play. With Proton 5.0-6 are some promising improvements. Most notably, Proton 5.0-6 will allow DOOM Eternal to run out-of-the-box under Steam Play on Linux. This Windows game was recently released and has been seeing improvements for its Wine-based Linux support. There have also been driver optimizations already by NVIDIA's Vulkan driver as well as RADV improvements too for some hardware with this latest game in the DOOM franchise. Now with Proton 5.0-6 should be a pleasant out-of-the-box experience after fixing some DRM failures. The latest Vulkan drivers are still a must.

  • More Switch games

    Sonic Mania is a really lovely homage to the classic 90s Sonic the Hedgehog platform games. Featuring more or less the classic gameplay, and expanded versions of the original levels, with lots of secrets, surprises and easter eggs for fans of the original. On my recommendation a friend of mine bought it for her daughter's birthday recently but her daughter will now have to prise her mum off it! Currently on sale at 30% off (£11.19). The one complaint I have about it is the lack of females in the roster of 5 playable characters.

  • Why Nullpomino is the only acceptable open-source Tetris

    Note: acceptable from the perspective of a Tetris fanatic who regularly uses jargon like SRS, lock delay, DAS, ARR, etc. For the casual player, these games are perfectly fine. Albeit, I would recommend Quadrapassel over KBlocks to casuals because of the better rotation.

Better than Zoom: Try these free software tools for staying in touch

In times like these it becomes all the more important to remember that tools like Zoom, Slack, and Facebook Messenger are not benign public services, and while the sentiment they've expressed to the global community in responding to the crisis may be sincere, it hasn't addressed the fundamental ethical issues with any piece of proprietary software. After taking the LibrePlanet 2020 conference online, we received a number of requests asking us to document our streaming setup. As the pandemic grew worse, this gave way to more curiosity about how the Free Software Foundation (FSF) uses free tools and free communication platforms to conduct our everyday business. And while the stereotype of hackers hunched over a white on black terminal session applies to us in some ways, many of the tools we use are available in any environment, even for people who do not have a lot of technical experience. We've started documenting ethical solutions on the LibrePlanet wiki, in addition to starting a remote communication mailing list to help each other advocate for their use. In the suggestions that follow, a few of the tools we will recommend depend upon some "self-reliance," that is, steering clear of proprietary network services by hosting free software solutions yourself, or asking a technical friend to do it for you. It's a difficult step, and the benefits may not be immediately obvious, but it's a key part of preserving your autonomy in an age of ubiquitous digital control. To those who have the technical expertise and available infrastructure, we urge you to consider hosting instances of free communication platforms for your friends, family, and your community at large. For example, with a modest server and some GNU/Linux knowledge, you could help local students learn in freedom by volunteering to administer an instance of one of the programs we'll be recommending below. The need to self-host can be an uncomfortable reminder of our dependence on the "cloud" -- the network of someone else's computers -- but acknowledging our current reliance on these providers is the first step in making new, dependable systems for ourselves. During dangerous and stressful times, it's tempting to sideline our ethical commitments for easier or more convenient ways to get things done, and software freedom is no exception. We hope these suggestions will inspire you to inform others about the importance of their freedom, privacy, and security. Read more