Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

Login

Enter your Tux Machines username.
Enter the password that accompanies your username.

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat: Project Quay, DoD, IBM Shares, Prometheus, DPDK/vDPA

  • Red Hat Introduces open source Project Quay container registry

    Today Red Hat is introducing the open sourcing of Project Quay, the upstream project representing the code that powers Red Hat Quay and Quay.io. Newly open sourced, as per Red Hat’s open source commitment, Project Quay represents the culmination of years of work around the Quay container registry since 2013 by CoreOS, and now Red Hat. Quay was the first private hosted registry on the market, having been launched in late 2013. It grew in users and interest with its focus on developer experience and highly responsive support, and capabilities such as image rollback and zero-downtime garbage collection. Quay was acquired in 2014 by CoreOS to bolster its mission to secure the internet through automated operations, and shortly after the CoreOS acquisition, the on-premise offering of Quay was released. This product is now known as Red Hat Quay.

  • DoD Taps Red Hat To Improve Squadron Operations

    The United States Department of Defense (DoD) partnered with Red Hat to help improve aircraft and pilot scheduling for United States Marine Corps (USMC), United States Navy (USN) and United States Air Force (USAF) aircrews.

  • There’s a Reason IBM Stock Is Dirt Cheap as Tech Stocks Soar

    Red Hat has a strong moat in the Unix operating system space. It is bringing innovation to the market by leveraging Linux, containers, and Kubernetes. And it is standardizing on the Red Hat OpenShift platform and bringing it together with IBM’s enterprisRed Hat has a strong moat in the Unix operating system space. It is bringing innovation to the market by leveraging Linux, containers, and Kubernetes. And it is standardizing on the Red Hat OpenShift platform and bringing it together with IBM’s enterprise. This will position IBM to lead in the hybrid cloud market.

  • Federated Prometheus with Thanos Receive

    OpenShift Container Platform 4 comes with a Prometheus monitoring stack preconfigured. This stack is in charge of getting cluster metrics to ensure everything is working seamlessly, so cool, isn’t it? But what happens if we have more than one OpenShift cluster and we want to consume those metrics from a single tool, let me introduce you to Thanos. In the words of its creators, Thanos is a set of components that can be composed into a highly available metrics system with unlimited storage capacity, which can be added seamlessly on top of existing Prometheus deployments.

  • Making high performance networking applications work on hybrid clouds

    In the previous post we covered the details of a vDPA related proof-of-concept (PoC) showing how Containerized Network Functions (CNFs) could be accelerated using a combination of vDPA interfaces and DPDK libraries. This was accomplished by using the Multus CNI plugin adding vDPA as secondary interfaces to kubernetes containers. We now turn our attention from NFV and accelerating CNFs to the general topic of accelerating containerized applications over different types of clouds. Similar to the previous PoC our focus remains on providing accelerated L2 interfaces to containers leveraging kubernetes to orchestrate the overall solution. We also continue using DPDK libraries to consume the packet efficiently within the application. In a nutshell, the goal of the second PoC is to have a single container image with a secondary accelerated interface that can run over multiple clouds without changes in the container image. This implies that the image will be certified only once decoupled from the cloud it’s running on. As will be explained, in some cases we can provide wirespeed/wirelatency performance (vDPA and full virtio HW offloading) and in other cases reduced performance if translations are needed such as AWS and connecting to its Elastic Network Adapter (ENA) interface. Still, as will be seen it’s the same image running on all clouds.

  • Pod Lifecycle Event Generator: Understanding the “PLEG is not healthy” issue in Kubernetes

Upcoming notification permission changes in Firefox 72

Notifications. Can you keep count of how many websites or services prompt you daily for permission to send notifications? Can you remember the last time you were thrilled to get one? Earlier this year we decided to reduce the amount of unsolicited notification permission prompts people receive as they move around the web using the Firefox browser. We see this as an intrinsic part of Mozilla’s commitment to putting people first when they are online. In preparation, we ran a series of studies and experiments. We wanted to understand how to improve the user experience and reduce annoyance. In response, we’re now making some changes to the workflow for how sites ask users for permission to send them notifications. Firefox will require explicit user interaction on all notification permission prompts, starting in Firefox 72. Read more

Security Updates and More Intel Defends

  • Security updates for Wednesday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (dpdk, intel-microcode, kernel, libssh2, qemu, and webkit2gtk), Fedora (apache-commons-beanutils, bluez, iwd, kernel, kernel-headers, kernel-tools, libell, and microcode_ctl), openSUSE (gdb), Oracle (kernel), Red Hat (kernel and kernel-rt), SUSE (dhcp, evolution, kernel, libcaca, python, python-xdg, qemu, sysstat, ucode-intel, and xen), and Ubuntu (dpdk, intel-microcode, kernel, linux, linux-aws, linux-kvm, linux, linux-lts-trusty, linux-azure, linux-hwe, linux-kvm, linux-oem, linux-oracle, linux-kvm, linux-oem-osp1, linux-oracle, linux-raspi2, linux-lts-xenial, linux-aws, linux-raspi2, and webkit2gtk).

  • Fedora and the November 12 Hardware Vulnerabilities.

    As all of the news sites are picking up stories on the latest hardware vulnerabilities, I felt it best to give the Fedora update. I won't go into detail on the vulnerabilities themselves, as Red Hat has already done a good write up on each of the CVEs which I will link to below. There is one case to note where Fedora will differ from the Red Hat write ups. For "Transactional Synchronization Extensions (TSX) Asynchronous Abort" Fedora has chosen to default to "tsx=off Disable the TSX feature". This will likely be of no impact to most users, but as Fedora has taken a different stance from the Red Hat documentation here, it should be noted.

  • Intel's Linux Graphics Driver Updated For Denial Of Service + Privilege Escalation Bugs

    Of the 77 security advisories Intel is making public and the three big ones of the performance-sensitive JCC Erratum, the new ZombieLoad TAA (TSX Asynchronous Abort), and iTLB Multihit No eXcuses, there are also two fixes to their kernel graphics driver around security issues separate from the CPU woes. CVE-2019-0155 is about user-space writes to the blitter command streamer that could allow an unprivileged user to elevate their privileges on the system. CVE-2019-0154 is the other vulnerability and that could result in an unprivileged user being able to cause a denial of service by reading select memory regions when the graphics hardware is in certain low-power configurations.

Programming: C++ in Libreoffice, Rust in GNU/GTK, and Python

  • Drawing in OutputDevice

    For a long time now I have noticed that OutputDevice is a class that is tightly coupled to drawing primitives such a pixels, lines, rectangles, etc. To draw new primitives in OutputDevice, you need to change the interface by adding another function, often you need to add new private functions, etc. I have never been entirely comfortable with this - I believe that we shouldn't vary the OutputDevice class, but instead the functionality should be implemented in a command pattern. In a command pattern, you use an object to encapsulate the functionality used to perform an action. What this means is that OutputDevice no longer needs to know how to directly draw a line, pixel, rectangle or any other primitive we throw at it - this is all done in the command object. I call these OutputDevice Drawables. It turns out, I find it easier to test a command object.

  • This Week in Rust 312

    Hello and welcome to another issue of This Week in Rust! Rust is a systems language pursuing the trifecta: safety, concurrency, and speed. This is a weekly summary of its progress and community. Want something mentioned? Tweet us at @ThisWeekInRust or send us a pull request. Want to get involved? We love contributions.

  • The GTK Rust bindings are not ready yet? Yes they are!

    When talking to various people at conferences in the last year or at conferences, a recurring topic was that they believed that the GTK Rust bindings are not ready for use yet. I don’t know where that perception comes from but if it was true, there wouldn’t have been applications like Fractal or Podcasts using GTK from Rust, or I wouldn’t be able to do a workshop about desktop application development in Rust with GTK and GStreamer at the Linux Application Summit in Barcelona this Friday (code can be found here already) or earlier this year at GUADEC. One reason I sometimes hear is that there is not support for creating subclasses of GTK types in Rust yet. While that was true, it is not true anymore nowadays. But even more important: unless you want to create your own special widgets, you don’t need that. Many examples and tutorials in other languages make use of inheritance/subclassing for the applications’ architecture, but that’s because it is the idiomatic pattern in those languages. However, in Rust other patterns are more idiomatic and even for those examples and tutorials in other languages it wouldn’t be the one and only option to design applications.

  • Getting Started With Python IDLE

    If you’ve recently downloaded Python onto your computer, then you may have noticed a new program on your machine called IDLE. You might be wondering, “What is this program doing on my computer? I didn’t download that!” While you may not have downloaded this program on your own, IDLE comes bundled with every Python installation. It’s there to help you get started with the language right out of the box. In this tutorial, you’ll learn how to work in Python IDLE and a few cool tricks you can use on your Python journey!

  • Advanced OpenGL in Python with PyGame and PyOpenGL

    Following the previous article, Understanding OpenGL through Python where we've set the foundation for further learning, we can jump into OpenGL using PyGame and PyOpenGL. PyOpenGL is the standardized library used as a bridge between Python and the OpenGL APIs, and PyGame is a standardized library used for making games in Python. It offers built-in handy graphical and audio libraries and we'll be using it to render the result more easily at the end of the article. As mentioned in the previous article, OpenGL is very old so you won't find many tutorials online on how to properly use it and understand it because all of the top dogs are already knee-deep in new technologies.

  • Norbert Preining: Python 3 deprecation imminent

    OSS Journal, November 2026. In less than two month, with the end of the year 2026, Python 3 will be deprecated and will not obtain any further security updates. Despite the announcement of deprecation back in summer 2020, shortly after the deprecation of Python 2, still thousands of software projects, in particular in data science, seem to be still based on Python 3. [...] The Python 3 deprecation has created a whole new branch of companies providing only Python upgrade services, but despite the abundance of these services, many programs are still available only for Python 3, some – like Calibre – even only for Python 2. So let us use the remaining month to fix the billions of lines of code still not compatible with Python 4, for a better future! Rest assured, it will be the last incompatible Python upgrade (for now).

  • My New Title, Improving pip, Availability For Work, And SSL (No, The Other One): A few professional announcements.

    One is that I helped the Packaging Working Group of the Python Software Foundation get funding for a long-needed improvement to pip. I led the writing of a few proposals -- grantwriting, to oversimplify -- and, starting possibly as soon as next month, contractors will start work.

  • File management improvements in Spyder4

    Version 4.0 of Spyder—a powerful Python IDE designed for scientists, engineers and data analysts—is almost ready! It has been in the making for well over two years, and it contains lots of interesting new features. We will focus on the Files pane in this post, where we've made several improvements to the interface and file management tools.

  • Artem Rys: 5 Scraping Tips