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Linux-driven RISC-V core to debut on an NXP i.MX SoC

The OpenHW Group unveiled a Linux-driven “CORE-V Chassis” eval SoC due for tape-out in 2H 2020 based on an NXP i.MX SoC, but featuring its RISC-V-and PULP-based 64-bit, 1.5GHz CV64A CPU and 32-bit CV32E cores. Meanwhile, Think Silicon demonstrated a RISC-V-based NEOX|V GPU. A not-for-profit, open source RISC-V initiative called the OpenHW Group that launched in June has announced that it plans to tape out a Linux-friendly CORE-V Chassis evaluation SoC in the second half of 2020 built around its 64-bit CV64A CPU core and 32-bit CV32E coprocessor. The RISC-V based cores will be integrated into an undefined, NXP i.MX heterogeneous, multi-core SoC design. The SoC was announced at this week’s RISC-V Summit in San Jose, Calif., where Think Silicon also demo’d an early version of a RISC-V-based NEOX|V GPU (see farther below). The open source CV64A CPU core and 32-bit CV32E are based on RISC-V architecture PULP Platform cores developed by the University of ETH Zurich. The 64-bit CV64A core is based on ETH Zurich’s Ariane implementation of its RV64GC RISC-V core IP. RV64GC is also used by many other RISC-V projects, including SiFive’s U54. Read more

today's howtos and leftovers

Juju 2.7: Enhanced k8s experience, improved networking and more

Canonical is proud to announce the availability of Juju 2.7. This new release introduces a range of exciting features and several improvements which enhance Juju across various areas. To learn more about Juju, visit our page. Kubernetes extensions Juju is becoming the simplest way to deploy and manage your container-centric workloads. This release was aimed at bringing more Juju features to k8s charms and more k8s features to Juju. K8s charms can now define actions, introspect agents, and communicate back to Juju via the addition of juju-run within the pod’s PATH environmental variable. Experienced k8s operators will feel more at home with the ability to set secrets, administer service accounts, and other k8s-native features from their charms directly. Read more Also: How using Charmed OSM helps telcos to accelerate their NFV transformation

Graphics: NVIDIA 440.44 Linux Driver, Microsoft Code, and WSL Performs Very Poorly

  • NVIDIA 440.44 Linux Driver Brings Fixes, __GL_SYNC_DISPLAY_DEVICE Honored With Vulkan

    Out today is NVIDIA 440.44 as the latest stable Linux driver update in their new long-lived driver series.  Succeeding the 440.36 and 440.31 stable drivers, the 440.44 release isn't too exciting but at least NVIDIA should be introducing a new beta series shortly. 

  • Intel's OpenSWR OpenGL Software Rasterizer Pulls In Tessellator From Microsoft Direct3D Code

    OpenSWR is Intel's performance-minded software rasterizer for purposes like workstation visualizations and is where it outperforms the likes of LLVMpipe. This CPU-based OpenGL implementation can make use of not only AVX/AVX2 but also AVX-512 and other optimizations to support speedy CPU-based GL operations from laptops to Xeon Scalable hardware. Like LLVMpipe, OpenSWR does leverage LLVM in part. Those unfamiliar with this long-standing Intel open-source project can learn more at OpenSWR.org.

  • Windows Subsystem For Linux Performance At The End Of 2019

    Recently I wrapped up some benchmarks looking at the performance of Ubuntu on Microsoft's Windows Subsystem for Linux comparing WSL on Windows 10 Build 18362 (May 2019 Update) and then both WSL and WSL2 performance using the Windows 10 Build 19008 Insider's Preview (what will come as Windows 10 20H1 update) for looking at where the WSL performance is heading. Additionally, looking at the bare metal performance of Ubuntu 18.04 LTS for which the WSL instances were based plus Ubuntu 19.10. As well, for the Windows-compatible tests also looking at how the Windows performance itself was outside of WSL/WSL2.