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Intel: Graphics, Hardware and Openwashing (in Proprietary GitHub) Monopoly

  • Intel Begins Their Open-Source Driver Support For Vulkan Ray-Tracing With Xe HPG - Phoronix

    Intel's open-source developers have begun publishing their patches enabling their "ANV" Vulkan Linux driver to support Vulkan ray-tracing! This is in preparation for next year's Xe HPG graphics card that will feature hardware-accelerated ray-tracing. Jason Ekstrand as the lead developer originally on the Intel ANV driver has posted today the initial ray-tracing code for ANV in order to support VK_KHR_ray_tracing for their forthcoming hardware. Today is the first time Intel has approved of this open-source code being published and more is on the way. The code today isn't enough for Vulkan ray-tracing but more is on the way and based against the latest internal Khronos ray-tracing specification. At the moment they are not focusing on the former NVIDIA-specific ray-tracing extension but may handle it in the future if game vendors continue targeting it rather than the forthcoming finalized KHR version.

  • Intel Reveals Few More Details Regarding 11th Gen "Rocket Lake" Processors - Phoronix

    While 11th Gen "Rocket Lake" desktop processors aren't expected to be released until the end of Q1'2021, given the interest building around AMD Ryzen 5000 "Zen 3" processors, Intel revealed a few more details today about their next-generation wares. Intel reiterated that Rocket Lake S is on track for Q1'2021 and will combine Cypress Cove cores with Gen12 Xe Graphics. Nothing new and was already expected based on prior Linux patches. Intel says that Rocket Lake will provide "double-digit percentage IPC performance improvements" gen-over-gen and enhanced graphics.

  • Intel's oneDNN Continues Improving Support For Non-Intel Hardware - Phoronix

    Earlier this year was the surprising move of Intel's oneDNN neural network library adding AArch64 support and that was then complemented by adding IBM POWER support to this neural network library that is part of their oneAPI collection. Now with the latest oneDNN 2.0 beta they have furthered the support and performance for non-Intel hardware. Not only is there IBM POWER (PowerPC 64) support but IBM z (390x) is also now supported by this library formerly known as MKL-DNN and DNNL. This library is focused on providing the "building blocks" for constructing deep learning applications.

today's howtos

  • Install a free Let's Encrypt SSL certificate on Debian 10 - PragmaticLinux

    This PragmaticLinux article teaches you how to generate a free Let's Encrypt SSL certificate and install it on your Debian based web server.

  • Install Squid Proxy On Ubuntu 20.04 | Itsubuntu.com

    Squid is a caching proxy for the Web. It has support for the HTTP, HTTPS, FTP, and other protocols. It helps to speed up a web server by caching repeated requests, caching web, DNS and access geo-restricted content.

  • How to Install Pandora FMS Monitoring Tool in Ubuntu 20.04

    Pandora FMS also know as "Pandora Flexible Monitoring System" is a monitoring tool used for servers, networks, applications, and virtual infrastructure. It is simple, scalable and suitable for complex and larger environments. It uses several protocols including, TCP, UDP, SNMP, HTTP and agents to collect the different metrics. You can monitor the status and performance of web servers, database servers, applications, routers, and other network devices using the Pandora FMS.

  • Display Git Repository Summary In Terminal Using Onefetch - OSTechNix

    Onefetch is a command line tool to display Git repository summary in terminal. Onefetch is like Neofetch but for Git repositories only.

  • How To Install AnyDesk on CentOS 8 - idroot

    In this tutorial we will show you how to install AnyDesk on CentOS 8, as well as some extra required package by AnyDesk

  • How to Format a USB drive in Debian

    Formatting a USB is a common operation in most computer systems and it comes in handy in a number of ways. For instance, you can format a USB drive if it gets infected with a virus, and data is corrupted or you want to change the file system as it is not compatible with your OS. Similarly, it can be helpful if you want to completely wipe off the old data so that you can fully use the storage space. So whatever the reason, you can easily format your USB device through different methods in a Debian operating system. In this article, I will show you different methods to format a USB drive on the command-line and on Debian Desktop. You can use either of them based on your preferences. Note that we have run the commands and procedure mentioned in this article on a Debian 10 system.

  • Linux Netstat Command Tutorial for SysAdmins [40 Examples]

    The netstat (network statistics) utility in Linux provides information related to network connections. You can use various netstat commands to display active network connections, interface data, routing tables, and so on. These are essential information for network admins and infosec professionals. That’s why we have prepared this guide with a wide selection of useful netstat examples. After completing this guide, you will be able to inspect all the network-related information for your Linux machine. We also encourage readers to try these examples on their own machine for obtaining a more hands-on experience.

  • Linux Fu: Troubleshooting Incron | Hackaday

    You probably know about cron, a program that lets you schedule programs to run at various times. We’ve also talked about incron, which is very similar but instead of time, it reacts to changes in the file system. If you ever wanted to write a program that, say, detects a change in a file and automatically uploads it to a programmer, backs it up, e-mails it somewhere, or anything else, then incron might be for you. Although we’ve talked about it before, incron has some peculiarities that make it very difficult to debug problems, so I thought I’d share some of the tricks I use when working with incron. I was thinking about this because I wanted to set up a simple system where I have a single document directory under git control. Changing a markdown file in that folder would generate Word document and PDF equivalents. Conversely, changing a Word document would produce a markdown version. This is easy to do with pandoc — it speaks many different formats. The trick is running it only on changed files and as soon as they change. The task isn’t that hard, but it does take a bit to debug since it’s a bit nontrivial.

Android Leftovers

PolarFire SoC board has GbE port and 40-pin GPIO

Sundance will soon launch an SBC-like, $995 “PolarBerry” module that runs Linux on Microchip’s FPGA-enabled, RISC-V based PolarFire SoC with 4GB DDR4 and eMMC, dual CAN, a GbE port, and RPi style 40-pin GPIO. Microchip’s PolarFire SoC, the world’s first SoC to combine a Linux-ready RISC-V architecture CPU with an FPGA, has so far appeared on an Aries M100PFS module and Microchip’s own PolarFire SoC Icicle Kit SBC. Now, UK-based FPGA manufacturer Sundance has announced a Raspberry Pi sized PolarBerry SoM equipped with the hybrid SoC. It will soon launch on Crowd Supply for $995, with shipments due in January. Read more